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#1 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 05:45 PM

I hesitate to say "Happy" memorial day to anyone. Because it should be solemn rather than happy.

But - Sound Off about your stories if relevant.Especially vis-a-vis WWI/WWII

Me? One grandfather, being rejected by the army for epilepsy, worked that the Kaiser/Willys/AMC "Jeep" Plant in Toledo Oh up until retirement in the late '70s or early '80s. Grandfather on stepmom's ran a POW camp in Ohio for Italian POWs (What is now Campy Peary in OH). Grandmother on Mrs Smithee's side wired radar sets for the RCA factory in Bloomington IN
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#2 User is offline   USNRETWIFE 

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 06:33 PM

I come from a very military family. All of my uncles on both Mom's and Dad's sides were in the various branches, two of whom retired from their branches. Dad was Navy. My grandfather, who did not serve, was frozen in a necessary job. Both of my brothers and all my brothers-in-law were military, various branches, with my younger brother retiring from the Air Force, and my older brother, a Viet Nam Purple Heart recipient, retired from the Army Reserve. My husband retired from the Navy. I now have a grandson and several nephews serving, all Army. But I have been very fortunate that we have lost no one in war, even though all of these men span from WWII to Iraq and Afghanistan. We attend the local VFW/American Legion ceremony at the cemetery each year, with my husband having helped perform in several. Being so close to this many servicemen, past and present, brings home that we could lose a loved one, and makes one very reverent of Memorial Day and those that gave their lives for this country.

This post has been edited by USNRETWIFE: 24 May 2019 - 06:38 PM

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#3 User is offline   GhostOfAndrewJackson 

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 09:36 PM

Family came over in 1620, several members served in the Revolutionary War, Border Wars, War of 1812, Spanish-American War, WWI. Custer was a cousin. Mothered was a WAVE in WWII, father in the OSS. He was captured by the Germans, rolled in barb wire which they heated with a blowtorch and branded by heated bayonets. His body was a mass of scar tissue. As a kid we cringed whenever he took off his shirt and you saw those horrible scars.

Sometimes I wonder what we fought for in WWII. Our country now faces a relentless invasion, our endemic cultures has been undermined and not a single bullet has been fired in this nation’s defense. When I think of all those that gave their life to establish this nation I am so sadden that no great battle, no not even a skirmish, marks her passing. It is sad day.

Then I think of my comrades...those that did not come back…sigh.

I use to help place wreaths and ribbons at the various memorials, grave etc and genuinely expressed my gratitude to the fallen. Now I am embarrassed that, in the end, it seems their sacrifice was in vain. I’ll still go out to honor the fallen, but in the end what did they fight for? We are giving this nation away, our Constitution has been undermined and as I said, no great battle to mark this nation’s passing…it a very sad thing.
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#4 User is offline   helton 

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 09:59 PM

No one in my family has ever died on the battlefield. My heart and thanks go out to those who have lost loved ones while serving our country.

My 99 year old Uncle Sidney fought in France for 3 years during WWII and lives in Northern California.

My dad was born in 1929, so he was too young to serve in WWII. But, he served in the Army National Guard at Fort Hamilton in Brooklyn from 1947-1955. While in hospice in Arizona in 2014, the facility learned that my father had served. Less than 24 hours later, they held a ceremony for him at his bedside with a rabbi and a retired naval physician as chaplain. They prepared a plaque with dogtags and other memorabilia to honor my dad's service.

Near the end of the 5 minute ceremony, the rabbi (who had an iPod) asked if he could play "Taps." Absolutely. When they were done, my wife noticed a teardrop on my dad's face. Even though he had been on morphine for the previous 4 days and had virtually no water left in his body, he must have heard the ceremony and summoned all of his strength to generate that one teardrop. He died less than 24 hours later.

The funeral director had 3 daughters who served in the Air Force. She said not to worry - she would treat my dad with respect and take care of everything with honor and dignity. And that's exactly what she did.

When I returned to NY, I told my relatives about what happened. Instead of being totally sad, they were uplifted by my dad going out on a high note. While I miss my father (and mother) every day, I will never forget the kindness shown by the people of Arizona towards my family.

God Bless our military and thank you to all of the military families who sacrifice when their loved ones serve - especially when their loved ones make the supreme sacrifice.
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#5 User is offline   Hieronymous 

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 02:37 PM

My father served in the Air Force during the Korean War. He did not see combat as his posting was stateside. After he died in 2009, the gentleman from the funeral home who helped us set up his memorial service was a World War 2 veteran who was stationed in the Aleutians after they were retaken from the Japanese.
My father didn't have much in the way of stories to tell us about his service, but if he hadn't served, he and my mother would never have met.

Godspeed to the heroes who gave all and thank you to all who serve(d). Plenty of people in this country still know what Memorial Day means and we will not forget.

This post has been edited by Hieronymous: 25 May 2019 - 02:38 PM

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#6 User is offline   zurg 

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 04:49 PM

 GhostOfAndrewJackson, on 24 May 2019 - 09:36 PM, said:

Family came over in 1620, several members served in the Revolutionary War, Border Wars, War of 1812, Spanish-American War, WWI. Custer was a cousin. Mothered was a WAVE in WWII, father in the OSS. He was captured by the Germans, rolled in barb wire which they heated with a blowtorch and branded by heated bayonets. His body was a mass of scar tissue. As a kid we cringed whenever he took off his shirt and you saw those horrible scars.

Sometimes I wonder what we fought for in WWII. Our country now faces a relentless invasion, our endemic cultures has been undermined and not a single bullet has been fired in this nation’s defense. When I think of all those that gave their life to establish this nation I am so sadden that no great battle, no not even a skirmish, marks her passing. It is sad day.

Then I think of my comrades...those that did not come back…sigh.

I use to help place wreaths and ribbons at the various memorials, grave etc and genuinely expressed my gratitude to the fallen. Now I am embarrassed that, in the end, it seems their sacrifice was in vain. I’ll still go out to honor the fallen, but in the end what did they fight for? We are giving this nation away, our Constitution has been undermined and as I said, no great battle to mark this nation’s passing…it a very sad thing.

It was not in vain!! Thank you for your family’s sacrifice. Without the sacrifices, we’d ALREADY be a socialist craphole. The spirit that values us as individuals and brings us together as a nation, VOLUNTARILY, is still alive and well in the majority of Americans. They just take it for granted and don’t realize there are leftist (communist type) forces that are hidden in the hearts of politicians that claim to be just left of center. That’s why I’m grateful for AOC, Omar, Tlaib, Pelosi, Nadler, Schumer, and the rest of the insane, because they make the take-for-granted crowd come to life a little more, politically speaking. I’m grateful for the Russia collusion investigation too, because it has exposed those people as who they REALLY are.

My mom and dad were well under 10 year olds when WWII broke. They were living in northern Finland, in an area where Russian incursions were frequent, and thus their families were evacuated several times towards Sweden. My mom had almost all sisters in her big family and the two boys were too young to fight in the war. They lost a sibling to illness during one evacuation. My dad had mostly brothers and one fought in the war, did not die. I’ve heard many many stories from them and my relatives about the war. My dad is in an assisted living community in Helsinki now and every time I visit, the older folks talk about the war still. To say that Finns are really proud of standing up to the Russians and almost beating them (final result was recorded as a loss with a payment required to Russia) is a huge understatement. Two facts: 1) Finland is the only nation to pay its war debt in full, and 2) the only capital cities of warring nations never occupied were Washington (but war was not fought on US soil except Hawaii), Moscow, London and Helsinki.
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#7 User is online   JerryL 

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 05:42 PM

One Grandpa was cook on a ship on WW2. Dad did his time in the Korea era but serving on the border between East and West Germany. Mom has a cousin who was a Huey pilot in Vietnam and flew MC1 for Nixon. I am a retired Naval Officer and my brother was a mechanic on EA-6Bs.

All of us vets but, thank God, none of us KIA. I currently work commemorating those that gave their all. In Tunisia at the North Africa American Cemetery (WW2) for Memorial Day. We helped “pin” (place flags) at the headstones this morning. The US has 26 Memorial cemeteries in 10 different countries. They are all hosting ceremonies this weekend and Monday.

This post has been edited by JerryL: 25 May 2019 - 05:42 PM

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#8 User is offline   USNRETWIFE 

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 06:28 PM

Hearing all of the family stories makes my heart swell and makes me very proud to be an American. And Ghost, I agree with Zurg. It was not in vain. But that doesn't mean we can be apathetic. We must be vigilant and work toward defending our country from the enemy within. As for your father, Ghost, http://www.rightnation.us/forums/public/style_emoticons/default/salute.gif.
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#9 User is offline   NH Populist 

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 05:36 AM

 USNRETWIFE, on 25 May 2019 - 06:28 PM, said:

And Ghost, I agree with Zurg. It was not in vain. But that doesn't mean we can be apathetic. We must be vigilant and work toward defending our country from the enemy within.

Anyone remember the show of Patriotism after 9/11? It's still there, we're a long way from becoming victims of the Left's assault on this country, the 2020 election will illustrate that in no uncertain terms.

Ex. Marine and Vietnam Vet here. Older brother served there as well in the Army, another brother served in the Navy at the same time. Memorial day is a time for reflection and appreciation, ours is the greatest country on earth because of the sacrifices made to keep her safe.
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#10 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 11:34 AM

 USNRETWIFE, on 24 May 2019 - 06:33 PM, said:

... But I have been very fortunate that we have lost no one in war, even though all of these men span from WWII to Iraq and Afghanistan.

 helton, on 24 May 2019 - 09:59 PM, said:

No one in my family has ever died on the battlefield. My heart and thanks go out to those who have lost loved ones while serving our country...

 JerryL, on 25 May 2019 - 05:42 PM, said:

..All of us vets but, thank God, none of us KIA...


Same here. Many have served but, fortunately, none killed or even seriously injured on the battlefield.

One side of the family came over from German Moravia in 1860, believing war to be imminent. As it happened, The Austro-Prussian war that led to the dissolution of the German Confederation which included Moravia didn't occur for another 6 years, and even then largely bypassed Moravia which is in what's now the Czech Republic.

But at least one ancestor ended up serving in the US Civil War in the 14th Ohio Regiment. I guess when you come from a place like the German Confederation that had been constantly on the verge of war and collapse since almost the day it was founded in 1815, you want to do everything you can to keep your newly adopted country from splitting apart too.

Since then, with the sole exception of Korea, someone from my family has served during ever war right up though Iraq/Afghanistan. Grenada myself, if I dare even call that a war, and a civilian contractor during Gulf War I. Younger brother was Navy also and on the USS Roosevelt in the Arabian Gulf during Iraq/Afghanistan.

Tomorrow, we're going to celebrate Memorial Day with good old American hot dogs, hamburgers, home-made potato salad... and Starobrno beer from Moravia.
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#11 User is offline   Ladybird 

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 05:08 PM

Grandfather was in the Spanish American war. He was from Jamaica and may have been a British subject. He died before I was born, butvI am named after him.
My dad was a WW2 veteran, in Belgium and France. His younger brother fought in Korea.

That’s it for war veterans. Lots of family are or were military, including my sister who is an Air Force veteran.
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