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Young girl’s snakebite leaves family with $142,938 medical bill Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Ben Cranklin 

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 01:37 PM

Young girl’s snakebite leaves family with $142,938 medical bill
By Lee Brown
April 30, 2019 | 12:23pm | Updated

A young girl bitten by a snake at summer camp was left with an elephant-size medical bill of $142,938, her parents say.

Oakley Yoder was 9 last July when a snake bit a toe on her right foot while she was at camp in Shawnee National Forest in Jackson Falls, Ill., according to NPR.

“I was really scared. I thought that I could either get paralyzed or could actually die,” Oakley, now 10, told NPR.

Camp counselors, suspecting the bite was from a venomous copperhead, gave her a piggyback until they reached first responders, who recommended taking her to a hospital by air ambulance, according to the report.

Her frantic parents, Josh Perry and Shelli Yoder, were already waiting at Indiana’s St. Vincent Evansville hospital when she arrived after the 80-mile flight.

Their relief at their daughter leaving the hospital after less than 24 hours soon turned to horror when the bills started arriving — totaling $142,938, according to the documents shared with NPR.

It included $55,577.64 for the air ambulance — and an even more staggering $67,957 for four vials of antivenin needed to protect her from the bite.

The bill shows the hospital charged $16,989.25 for each unit of CroFab, the only drug available to treat venomous bites from pit vipers at the time — more than five times higher than the average list price of $3,198.

“It’s a profitable drug and everyone wants a piece of it,” said Dr. Leslie Boyer, founding director of research center the VIPER Institute.

The family’s health insurance, IU Health Plans, negotiated down the bills and paid $107,863.33, with secondary insurance from the summer camp covering $7,286.34 in additional costs.

The family ultimately did not have to pay any out-of-pocket costs for her additional emergency care, according to NPR.

Link
_________________________________________


OK, so eventually none of it actually came out of their pocket; that price tag is still pretty amazing. :thud:
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#2 User is offline   Ben Cranklin 

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 01:54 PM

My mother down in Florida knows a senior who had to be airlifted to a hospital and that alone was about $40,000, too. Can't recall the details exactly, but something about how the woman's husband was stubborn about getting Medicare supplemental and now his kids have to pay tens of thousands out of pocket. If Medicare even covers airlifts, at all?

Edit to add: actually looked into it some to job my memory, and the old man refused to get Medicare Part B for himself and his wife, which is what would have covered the airlift to the hospital. Part A does NOT cover that, just regular ground ambulance. Not having had Part B, his son and daughter-in-law have to step in to pay off the airlift for their retired parents, now.

This post has been edited by Ben Cranklin: 30 April 2019 - 04:35 PM

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#3 User is offline   Noclevermoniker 

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 02:48 PM

They should have taken her to the vet. $800 / vial for copperhead antivenom. Both of my dachsies got hit by the same snake a few years ago. Made even my feisty one lethargic...for a day.
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#4 User is offline   Magic Rat 

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 04:35 PM

I guess I'm weird about things. Rather than go to the media to whore for attention and bitch about my medical bills, I would work out a payment plan and be grateful that my little girl is not dead.
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#5 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 08:44 PM

View PostBen Cranklin, on 30 April 2019 - 01:37 PM, said:

Young girl’s snakebite leaves family with $142,938 medical bill
By Lee Brown
April 30, 2019 | 12:23pm | Updated

A young girl bitten by a snake at summer camp was left with an elephant-size medical bill of $142,938, her parents say.

Oakley Yoder was 9 last July when a snake bit a toe on her right foot while she was at camp in Shawnee National Forest in Jackson Falls, Ill., according to NPR.

“I was really scared. I thought that I could either get paralyzed or could actually die,” Oakley, now 10, told NPR.

Camp counselors, suspecting the bite was from a venomous copperhead, gave her a piggyback until they reached first responders, who recommended taking her to a hospital by air ambulance, according to the report.

Her frantic parents, Josh Perry and Shelli Yoder, were already waiting at Indiana’s St. Vincent Evansville hospital when she arrived after the 80-mile flight.

Their relief at their daughter leaving the hospital after less than 24 hours soon turned to horror when the bills started arriving — totaling $142,938, according to the documents shared with NPR.

It included $55,577.64 for the air ambulance — and an even more staggering $67,957 for four vials of antivenin needed to protect her from the bite.

The bill shows the hospital charged $16,989.25 for each unit of CroFab, the only drug available to treat venomous bites from pit vipers at the time — more than five times higher than the average list price of $3,198.

“It’s a profitable drug and everyone wants a piece of it,” said Dr. Leslie Boyer, founding director of research center the VIPER Institute.

The family’s health insurance, IU Health Plans, negotiated down the bills and paid $107,863.33, with secondary insurance from the summer camp covering $7,286.34 in additional costs.

The family ultimately did not have to pay any out-of-pocket costs for her additional emergency care, according to NPR.

Link
_________________________________________


OK, so eventually none of it actually came out of their pocket; that price tag is still pretty amazing. :thud:


Well, maybe THAT's the problem. DIDN'T come out of their pocket.

:ranton:

I've been EMS/EMT on and off since the late '70s (First Gig? Gregg Twp (IN) VFD circa '77 or so). People think that because we are volunteers that's it's all "free". I volunteer my "time". But there's still an ambulance that has to be paid for, still a firehouse that has to be paid for. In real cash-money dollars.

:rantoff:

Hat-In-Hand here: Fish Fry, or whatever, at your local VFD? Please do your best.
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#6 User is offline   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 01:05 AM

Those costs are ridiculous and obscene and ought to be criminal.

And the patient/victim never has any say in what expensive services that they can get or not?

It's like you walked into a store with your shopping cart and the store employees begin filling your cart to the top with the most expensive items that there are in the store many of which you do not want nor need and you are obligated to pay for all of them and are not allowed to refuse any of them whether you like it or not.

I've had to go through this many times over with my parents and family who had to be taken and admitted into hospitals. It is insane. They were all charged for many items and doctor visits and services that they never received or ever saw. It was always a nightmare fighting these super ultra expensive bullshidt fraudulent charges and unneeded items/services and getting them removed from their bills.

For example, $150 to $300 for two lousy aspirin or tylenol? They won't let you bring or take your own.
They won't let you bring or use your own prescribed drugs of any type and theirs costs thousands of percent more.

It's the hospitals more than the doctors, nurses etc. who are ripping everyone off. They are supposed to be non profit but they definitely do make a profit and an obscene one at that. They're paying for all those new wings being added on and new hospitals somehow?

This post has been edited by Rock N' Roll Right Winger: 01 May 2019 - 01:06 AM

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#7 User is offline   Taggart Transcontinental 

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 05:35 AM

View PostBen Cranklin, on 30 April 2019 - 01:37 PM, said:

Young girl's snakebite leaves family with $142,938 medical bill
By Lee Brown
April 30, 2019 | 12:23pm | Updated

A young girl bitten by a snake at summer camp was left with an elephant-size medical bill of $142,938, her parents say.

Oakley Yoder was 9 last July when a snake bit a toe on her right foot while she was at camp in Shawnee National Forest in Jackson Falls, Ill., according to NPR.

"I was really scared. I thought that I could either get paralyzed or could actually die," Oakley, now 10, told NPR.

Camp counselors, suspecting the bite was from a venomous copperhead, gave her a piggyback until they reached first responders, who recommended taking her to a hospital by air ambulance, according to the report.

Her frantic parents, Josh Perry and Shelli Yoder, were already waiting at Indiana's St. Vincent Evansville hospital when she arrived after the 80-mile flight.

Their relief at their daughter leaving the hospital after less than 24 hours soon turned to horror when the bills started arriving — totaling $142,938, according to the documents shared with NPR.

It included $55,577.64 for the air ambulance — and an even more staggering $67,957 for four vials of antivenin needed to protect her from the bite.

The bill shows the hospital charged $16,989.25 for each unit of CroFab, the only drug available to treat venomous bites from pit vipers at the time — more than five times higher than the average list price of $3,198.

"It's a profitable drug and everyone wants a piece of it," said Dr. Leslie Boyer, founding director of research center the VIPER Institute.

The family's health insurance, IU Health Plans, negotiated down the bills and paid $107,863.33, with secondary insurance from the summer camp covering $7,286.34 in additional costs.

The family ultimately did not have to pay any out-of-pocket costs for her additional emergency care, according to NPR.

Link
_________________________________________


OK, so eventually none of it actually came out of their pocket; that price tag is still pretty amazing. :thud:


Because Government is involved all the people upstream can soak us for tax dollars downstream. This treatment shouldn't have cost nearly that much. Helo ride for the aircraft should be about 4,000 / hour so they flew 10+ hours? That includes the time salary and costs of operating. Even 10,000 / hour is still outrageous. Figuring the pilot probably makes 50-70K / year on average they paid the annual salary for that pilot in one bill.

They need to start putting MASH units around the nation again and see these air ambulance costs pushed down. US Government isn't allowed to compete when there are private businesses doing work in the local area, that is why military medevac has gone down hill. Oh that law applies to everything but what marxists want it to apply to so medical insurance, school loans etc those can be directly competed against.

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#8 User is offline   Taggart Transcontinental 

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 05:39 AM

View PostRock N, on 01 May 2019 - 01:05 AM, said:

Those costs are ridiculous and obscene and ought to be criminal.

And the patient/victim never has any say in what expensive services that they can get or not?

It's like you walked into a store with your shopping cart and the store employees begin filling your cart to the top with the most expensive items that there are in the store many of which you do not want nor need and you are obligated to pay for all of them and are not allowed to refuse any of them whether you like it or not.

I've had to go through this many times over with my parents and family who had to be taken and admitted into hospitals. It is insane. They were all charged for many items and doctor visits and services that they never received or ever saw. It was always a nightmare fighting these super ultra expensive bullshidt fraudulent charges and unneeded items/services and getting them removed from their bills.

For example, $150 to $300 for two lousy aspirin or tylenol? They won't let you bring or take your own.
They won't let you bring or use your own prescribed drugs of any type and theirs costs thousands of percent more.

It's the hospitals more than the doctors, nurses etc. who are ripping everyone off. They are supposed to be non profit but they definitely do make a profit and an obscene one at that. They're paying for all those new wings being added on and new hospitals somehow?


In Michigan I was bleeding out of my ear. Tri-Care was billed 800 US for one Motrin. The more illegals a population has the higher the individual costs so they can pay for the primary care of those illegals. That is why Obamacare was born. To be a insurance based venue for the costing of illegals. They can now hide the cost of illegals with the rest of us and we can't pull them out so easily. Just another money laundering scheme.
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