RightNation.US
News (Home) | Righters' Blog | Hollywood Halfwits | Our Store | New User Intro | Link to us | Support Us

RightNation.US: Spaghetti Westerns - RightNation.US

Jump to content

Spaghetti Westerns Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   MontyPython 

  • Pull My Finger.....
  • View gallery
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 59,179
  • Joined: 28-February 03

Posted 26 September 2019 - 12:23 AM

They're cheap & cheesy...And I love 'em. Spaghetti westerns.

I'm right now watching the final hour of "The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly", and although I've seen it a bajillion times before I'm enjoying it anyway. I'll be whistling that theme song for days.

And the same goes for "Once Upon a Time in the West"...the "Dollars" trilogy..."Duck You Sucker"...and plenty more.

Anybody else love spaghetti westerns?

:coolshades:
0

#2 User is offline   LeansToTheRight 

  • Dr. Elson Floyd. RIP
  • Group: Bronze
  • Posts: 2,350
  • Joined: 25-October 03

Posted 26 September 2019 - 12:56 AM

I grew up a little bit later than you, so I don’t have the same love for the genre. However, I do really like “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly”.
0

#3 User is offline   erp 

  • Undead Undead Undead
  • Group: Silver
  • Posts: 38,191
  • Joined: 29-November 03

Posted 26 September 2019 - 03:43 AM

Big fan here. My Name Is Nobody is one of my favorites.
0

#4 User is offline   Bad_Apple 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Bronze
  • Posts: 220
  • Joined: 07-August 03

Posted 26 September 2019 - 05:47 AM

I always liked the Trinity movies with Terrence Hill
0

#5 User is offline   Howsithangin 

  • The more ppl I meet, the more I like my cats
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 28,618
  • Joined: 07-March 08

Posted 26 September 2019 - 07:02 AM

I didn't used to be, but I am now. My dad was a big fan of westerns. In his waning years we'd spend hours bonding as we watched the corny things and eating all-American meals like burgers, sloppy Joe & such
0

#6 User is offline   bigpapa 

  • Zygotista
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 9,046
  • Joined: 18-December 03

Posted 26 September 2019 - 07:19 AM

Huge fan! The Good the Bad and the Ugly is definitely my favorite. The Trinity movies come close, though. High Plains Drifter is way up on the list, too.
0

#7 User is offline   Noclevermoniker 

  • Wire Dachsies Matter
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 17,413
  • Joined: 13-November 03

Posted 26 September 2019 - 07:41 AM

High Plains Drifter among my faves. G, B & U is a winner.
0

#8 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

  • <no title>
  • View gallery
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 36,642
  • Joined: 13-January 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 07:44 AM

The Mexican beer Modelo has appropriated the theme from The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly.
0

#9 User is offline   MontyPython 

  • Pull My Finger.....
  • View gallery
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 59,179
  • Joined: 28-February 03

Posted 26 September 2019 - 08:18 AM

Um...For the record..."High Plains Drifter" isn't a spaghetti western. It was produced by Malpaso & Universal, directed by (and starring) Clint Eastwood, and filmed at Mono Lake, California. It's true that much of Eastwood's inspiration came from iconic spaghetti-western producer/director Sergio Leone, but Leone wasn't in any way associated with the production.

B)
0

#10 User is offline   Severian 

  • Order of the Seekers for Truth & Penitence
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 14,755
  • Joined: 14-February 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 08:33 AM

Oh man, do I love Spaghetti Westerns! Especially Sergio Leone's ones. It still boggles my mind that the best westerns were made by an Italian. My fave is "Once Upon A Time In The West." What a magnificent epic tale of revenge! And G, B, & U is of course a masterpiece as well. I really, really like "For A Few Dollars More" as well, especially Lee Van Cleef's portrayal of a Southern gentleman bounty hunter, that whole movie is fairly surreal as well, the scenes with the watch especially.

Clint Eastwood's follow on Westerns, while not Spaghetti Westerns, are good too. "Pale Rider," "High Plains Drifter," and especially "Unforgiven. The latter is probably closer to how it really was in the West in reality from what I've read of the frontier. No one was a hero, it was a collection of different forces, and the sheriff was just a thug. People doing things because they had to, needed money, wanted revenge, and not just for what happened but a boiling over of hatred, etc.

But yeah, Spaghetti Westerns rock.
0

#11 User is offline   oki 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 26,087
  • Joined: 14-October 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 09:29 AM

View PostMontyPython, on 26 September 2019 - 08:18 AM, said:

Um...For the record..."High Plains Drifter" isn't a spaghetti western. It was produced by Malpaso & Universal, directed by (and starring) Clint Eastwood, and filmed at Mono Lake, California. It's true that much of Eastwood's inspiration came from iconic spaghetti-western producer/director Sergio Leone, but Leone wasn't in any way associated with the production.

B)


Also noteworthy is the fact that a number of American Westerns where actually inspired by some of Akira Kurasawa's work. IE Seven Samurai
IE A fistful of Dollars is very close and even considered an adaption of Yojimbo
The magnificent seven is considered very close to Seven Samurai. Ironic in the fact that there was still a fare amount of anti Japanese sentiment when that was released.

http://www.legacy.co...lywood-classics

https://www.premiumb...ema-after-wwii/

Do itashimashte Monty Python san...
Your very welcome Mr Monty Python... :drinkers:
0

#12 User is offline   oki 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 26,087
  • Joined: 14-October 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 09:33 AM

View PostMTP Reggie, on 26 September 2019 - 07:44 AM, said:

The Mexican beer Modelo has appropriated the theme from The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly.



That's is correct.... but, for some crazy reason I always hear that playing in my head when I walk into the bedroom after a few beers with the wife.....

:whistling:
0

#13 User is offline   MontyPython 

  • Pull My Finger.....
  • View gallery
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 59,179
  • Joined: 28-February 03

Posted 26 September 2019 - 10:33 AM

View Postoki, on 26 September 2019 - 09:29 AM, said:

Do itashimashte Monty Python san...


Gesundheit!


View Postoki, on 26 September 2019 - 09:29 AM, said:

Your very welcome Mr Monty Python... :drinkers:


You're welcome.

:D
0

#14 User is offline   oki 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 26,087
  • Joined: 14-October 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 11:24 AM

View PostMontyPython, on 26 September 2019 - 10:33 AM, said:

Gesundheit!




You're welcome.

:D


Crazy where inspiration can come from or originate. To be honest though I have always preferred Clint Eastwood's Westerns to be much better than anything else of the time(and by in large since). Far more realistic and honest than anything else of the time. Not taking anything away from the greats like John Wayne, just that they where good but in a much different way. It's very telling though that in the end Eastwood really did get the last laugh because by the late eighties even most all Westerns being made where no longer the good guys always where white, don't shoot anyone on Sunday stuff was a thing of the past and replaced with exactly what Eastwood pioneered. If I remember reading correctly Eastwood took a lot of flak for his work in those early days. Truth be told though how he played his characters and everything else is a hell of a lot closer to truth than what anyone else was filming in the 50s,60's,70's and I think throughout most of the eighties even. I know you like the Spaghetti Westerns, BUT, if you have not seen Unforgiven it is an absolute must. Pale Rider is also very good, but Unforgiven, damn that's at a whole new level.
0

#15 User is offline   Severian 

  • Order of the Seekers for Truth & Penitence
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 14,755
  • Joined: 14-February 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 11:59 AM

As is, and has always been, true, people are complex, there are and never were any simple good white hat and bad black hat types. Everyone is more than that, and less. There are bad guys, but few truly white hat hero types. I've lately been reading a lot about Wild Bill Hickok, and the truth as opposed to the legend is quite a different story. There is no doubt though that he was an amazing shot, though the tales of his gunfights are grossly overwrought. He was a hard man, but an honorable one, who did his best in a lawless country to act as a sheriff and lawman when called upon, and had nowhere near the body count his legend says. Nor was he at all capricious in his use of violence. Not that he hesitated when it was required. A complex man, not the simple caricature we see today.

Every other historical figure you read about is the same, all human, all with failings and good points, as you might imagine.
0

#16 User is offline   oki 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 26,087
  • Joined: 14-October 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 12:21 PM

View PostSeverian, on 26 September 2019 - 11:59 AM, said:

As is, and has always been, true, people are complex, there are and never were any simple good white hat and bad black hat types. Everyone is more than that, and less. There are bad guys, but few truly white hat hero types. I've lately been reading a lot about Wild Bill Hickok, and the truth as opposed to the legend is quite a different story. There is no doubt though that he was an amazing shot, though the tales of his gunfights are grossly overwrought. He was a hard man, but an honorable one, who did his best in a lawless country to act as a sheriff and lawman when called upon, and had nowhere near the body count his legend says. Nor was he at all capricious in his use of violence. Not that he hesitated when it was required. A complex man, not the simple caricature we see today.

Every other historical figure you read about is the same, all human, all with failings and good points, as you might imagine.


They also acted by in large to the norms and laws of the time. When you really dig deep many of the respected and honored types would probably have ended up in prison today.
Patt Garret, ambushing Billy the Kid, Wyatt Earp was known to simply knock people out(but, still better than shooting them), a number where also known to be racist in the fact that many did not like Indians one bit. Best just to judge by the standards of the time.
0

#17 User is offline   Magic Rat 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Bronze
  • Posts: 7,005
  • Joined: 12-April 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 02:25 PM

View Postoki, on 26 September 2019 - 12:21 PM, said:

They also acted by in large to the norms and laws of the time. When you really dig deep many of the respected and honored types would probably have ended up in prison today.
Patt Garret, ambushing Billy the Kid, Wyatt Earp was known to simply knock people out(but, still better than shooting them), a number where also known to be racist in the fact that many did not like Indians one bit. Best just to judge by the standards of the time.

Because Wyatt Earp was able to control the Hollywood narrative, his story has been pretty whitewashed. Earp was a technical consultant in the early days of the movies so he was able to tell the story his way. Even for the time, Earp was tough, ruthless and at times, vicious. He was also bitter, nasty and vain. It was common for Earp to slam the barrel of his pistol on the head of an enemy, or to keep the peace or just because the guy pissed him off. It was called buffaloing.

Because of the whitewash, it's seldom mentioned that Earp's primary occupation was pimp. They hint at it in Tombstone when Clanton calls the Earps pimps but never mentioned again. Hilariously, in Wyatt Earp with Costner, he is a simpering frail who is shocked to find out that his brother pimps his wife. He is always portrayed as a reluctant hero who is looking to retire and just run square faro game and spend time with his family but the corrupt circumstances of Tombstone forces him onto action again.

This is nonsense. The real points of contention between The Cowboys (Yes, they really were called that.) and the Earps were politics, greed and sex. Union Republican, Earp coveted Confederate Democrat Johnny Behan's job as Cochise Country Sheriff because the sheriff was not only a law enforcement position but was also responsible for tax collecting. As tax collector, the sheriff earned a fee of 10% of all he collected. Oh, and whatever else he could skim... Also, and they make this pretty clear in the movies, Earp wanted to bang Josephine Marcus who was sleeping Behan.

In those days, the Republicans in Tombstone mostly represented the businessmen in town and the miners, while the Democrats represented the ranchers and other agricultural interests. The Earps had gambling and prostitution interests in several Tombstone saloons and also interests in several silver mines. These were political battles but basically the Earps and Cowboys were two crime families in a mob war.

I like the movie Tombstone a lot and even though is sanctifies the Earps, It is a fun movie and it's portrayal of the Gunfight at the OK Corral was pretty accurate (Outside of Doc firing a double barreled shotgun 3 times.), even the motives of the fight were more or less portrayed accurately. Earp's famous shooting of Indian Charlie was pretty accurate of events according to Earp and his allies. A lot of events are, of course exaggerated and missing as well as timelines shifting but still a great movie. I love Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer stole every scene he was in. But, like any movie, it had strong parts but to trust it as history would be silly.

The movies with Costner, Henry Fonda, James Gardner and Burt Lancaster are okay but I prefer Tombstone over them.

Earp did have a so-called "Vendetta Ride" and it is an awesome story but because of human frailties and personalities like Severian pointed out, the movies actually make it more of a justice ride than a revenge one. That is why the movies are so good though.

This post has been edited by Magic Rat: 26 September 2019 - 02:30 PM

0

#18 User is offline   Severian 

  • Order of the Seekers for Truth & Penitence
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 14,755
  • Joined: 14-February 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 02:40 PM

I always liked the movie "Open Range" with Kevin Costner and Robert Duvall as two cattle men driving their herd who get set upon by thugs from a corrupt rancher who owns the small town and the law there. Leads to a very believable gun battle, people at close range missing each other, random wild shots, no focused gun discipline, which is all very believable. Costner plays an ex gunslinger and he is the most deadly of all of them, and ruthless, overall a good movie, as is most everything with Duvall in it. When they know they're going up against the corrupt sheriff and his gang, Duvall's character says, well, we're gonna die, but so what, and buys expensive cigars and imported European chocolate as a last treat, live it up before the big fight.
0

#19 User is offline   MontyPython 

  • Pull My Finger.....
  • View gallery
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 59,179
  • Joined: 28-February 03

Posted 26 September 2019 - 03:06 PM

View Postoki, on 26 September 2019 - 11:24 AM, said:

Crazy where inspiration can come from or originate. To be honest though I have always preferred Clint Eastwood's Westerns to be much better than anything else of the time(and by in large since). Far more realistic and honest than anything else of the time. Not taking anything away from the greats like John Wayne, just that they where good but in a much different way. It's very telling though that in the end Eastwood really did get the last laugh because by the late eighties even most all Westerns being made where no longer the good guys always where white, don't shoot anyone on Sunday stuff was a thing of the past and replaced with exactly what Eastwood pioneered. If I remember reading correctly Eastwood took a lot of flak for his work in those early days. Truth be told though how he played his characters and everything else is a hell of a lot closer to truth than what anyone else was filming in the 50s,60's,70's and I think throughout most of the eighties even. I know you like the Spaghetti Westerns, BUT, if you have not seen Unforgiven it is an absolute must. Pale Rider is also very good, but Unforgiven, damn that's at a whole new level.


Oh rest assured I've seen both Unforgiven and Pale Rider. I'm pretty sure I've seen every Clint Eastwood western. I think my favorite is probably The Outlaw Josie Wales. But I'm trying to stay with spaghetti westerns here.


View PostSeverian, on 26 September 2019 - 02:40 PM, said:

I always liked the movie "Open Range" with Kevin Costner and Robert Duvall as two cattle men driving their herd who get set upon by thugs from a corrupt rancher who owns the small town and the law there. Leads to a very believable gun battle, people at close range missing each other, random wild shots, no focused gun discipline, which is all very believable. Costner plays an ex gunslinger and he is the most deadly of all of them, and ruthless, overall a good movie, as is most everything with Duvall in it. When they know they're going up against the corrupt sheriff and his gang, Duvall's character says, well, we're gonna die, but so what, and buys expensive cigars and imported European chocolate as a last treat, live it up before the big fight.


Yup, I've seen Open Range too. I can't deny I find the whole first 90% of the movie rather boring; Tedious. But that shoot-out at the end MORE than makes up for it. I nominate it for "Best Western Shoot-Out Scene Of All Time".

B)
0

#20 User is offline   Severian 

  • Order of the Seekers for Truth & Penitence
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 14,755
  • Joined: 14-February 04

Posted 26 September 2019 - 03:29 PM

Josie Wales was outstanding, truly a great film. I like all of Eastwood's Westerns. But then I also groove on the old John Wayne things, and things like "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence" and the original "High Noon." There's a place for white hat/black hat morality tales, as well as a place for more brutally realistic and honest portrayals.

The Netflix movie "The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs" is outstanding as well. Done by the Cohen Brothers, it's six different independent stories/vignettes, ranging from hysterically funny (Buster Scruggs) thru dark and depressing, to tragic, to surreal. A wonderful mix all done with the highest production values and great acting. Stunning scenery, the one set on the wagon train really captures the immensity of the country they were traveling over, nothing for hundreds and hundreds of miles. The scale of the west by wagon is intimidating.
0

Share this topic:


  • 2 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users