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#1 User is offline   pepperonikkid 

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  Posted 07 December 2018 - 07:06 AM

This Is No Drill


https://spectator.org
Geoffrey Norman
December 7, 2018

Article:

The first bomb fell a little before morning colors and by the time the attack was over, less than three hours later, the U.S. Navy had lost almost all of what it considered its capital ships. These were the battleships, one of which had blown up when a Japanese bomb penetrated a magazine where powder for the ship's main batteries was stored. What is left of the U.S. Arizona still lies on the bottom, in the mud of Pearl Harbor. There is a monument built over the ship's ruined hull, with the names of her dead — 1,117 of them — inscribed on one wall. You can look down into the water and see the spectral outline of the ship's hull. It is a tomb, of sorts, holding the remains of 1,102 of those Arizona dead. Small red and blue ribbons, made by oil still leaking from the ship's bunkers, drift in the water over the ship's carcass.

All of the eight battleships that were in port on that Sunday morning were hit. The Oklahoma took nine torpedoes and rolled over, trapping many of its crewmen below decks where they began banging on bulkheads to get the attention of potential rescuers. The sound of that tapping haunted the men trying to get to those survivors and eventually 32 were rescued. Many more were not. Of the 2,335 who were killed in the Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor, 429 were from the Oklahoma.

Aboard West Virginia, three crewmen were similarly trapped. They found an air pocket where they huddled and waited for rescue. It did not come. It was not possible to get to the men who continued their tapping. They had a calendar and they crossed off each day once they had survived it. When their bodies were found, long after the attack, that calendar showed they had lasted sixteen days before they ran out of air.

The Oklahoma was so badly damaged that it could not be repaired and returned to service. The other battleships, to include West Virginia,were repaired and sent back to war. West Virginia took part in the last battleship action in history when the U.S. "crossed the T" of a pitifully meager Japanese force in the battle of Surigao Strait.

The Japanese believed that they had won a splendid and complete victory at Pearl Harbor. They had achieved utter surprise and they had broken the backbone of the United States Navy which, without battleships, could not challenge the Japanese for control of the Pacific.

So, its leaders believed, that for many months, even years, Japan could consolidate the empire it had seized — or soon would, as in the case of the Philippines — and be secure against any challenge by sea.

However, in war, it sometimes seems there is nothing so uncertain as certainty.

The Japanese had won a splendid victory but…


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#2 User is offline   BerkeleyUnderground 

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 03:32 PM

This doesn't seem like such "ancient" history to me but I guess it kind of is.

And I wouldn't be surprised if the bigger "problem" coming out of this era to be remembered is the internment of the Japanese in this country and not the surprise attack of December 7, 1941.
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#3 User is offline   SARGE 

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 04:56 PM

View PostBerkeleyUnderground, on 07 December 2018 - 03:32 PM, said:

This doesn't seem like such "ancient" history to me but I guess it kind of is.

And I wouldn't be surprised if the bigger "problem" coming out of this era to be remembered is the internment of the Japanese in this country and not the surprise attack of December 7, 1941.


I salute the fallen. Saw or read that there are only five military survivors of the attack, all to old to attend the ceremonies at the Arizona.

As a kid we frequently passed Tule Lake Relocation Center when going to visit relatives. I'm a baby boomer. My Mom was 14 when Pearl Harbor was attacked.

When I was about 14 I remember asking her how we could have locked up American citizens like that.

She replied, "You can't understand the mood we had at that time".

Trivia:

Pat Morita, Karate Kid and Happy Days, and George Takei - Mr. Sulu from Star Trek, were interned at Tule Lake.

This post has been edited by SARGE: 07 December 2018 - 05:02 PM

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#4 User is offline   BerkeleyUnderground 

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 05:51 PM

I saw a recent "NCIS: Los Angeles" episode where there was an apology for the internment.
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#5 User is offline   tailgunner 

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 07:23 PM

Keep in mind. Unlike my generation, cheering each dead American that came back from Nam. It would have been quite different when the casualties counts came in from the Pacific. I believe Japanese Americans would have taken a beating in revenge. Unfair as it would have been. Take the movie "Bad Day at Dead rock." The main protagonist is rejected for enlistment after Pearl Harbor and ultimately kills a Japanese American farmer in revenge.


https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047849/
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#6 User is offline   oki 

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Posted 10 December 2018 - 10:13 PM

View PostSARGE, on 07 December 2018 - 04:56 PM, said:

I salute the fallen. Saw or read that there are only five military survivors of the attack, all to old to attend the ceremonies at the Arizona.

As a kid we frequently passed Tule Lake Relocation Center when going to visit relatives. I'm a baby boomer. My Mom was 14 when Pearl Harbor was attacked.

When I was about 14 I remember asking her how we could have locked up American citizens like that.

She replied, "You can't understand the mood we had at that time".

Trivia:

Pat Morita, Karate Kid and Happy Days, and George Takei - Mr. Sulu from Star Trek, were interned at Tule Lake.


The part that is left out is that Japan had a very active and successful espionage operation. That they knew exactly where the ships where, had detailed photos, knew when to strike was not dumb luck. Fearing wide spread attacks from both the Japanese military as well as spies and saboteurs the decision was made to open the camps and force people into them. Sadly, it wasn't until much later on that we learned Japan largely tricked Japanese speaking Americans into providing intel. But, by this time innocent and honorable Americans had been stripped of property, and treated as a sub class of people. It's easy to judge with 70 some years of hi insight, things change drastically though when you step back in time and look at in a way that presents itself of what was the conditions, the believed info and so on of the time. It was an awful mistake, but, at the same time we must understand and look at it through the eyes of the people in charge at the time and not know.

Also, the 442nd was made up of people largely (if not completely) who where either in the internment camps or had family there. Truly those brave Nisei(which means second generation in Japanese) are the stuff of legend. There record and reputation is incredible. There is a lesson to be learned from them, unlike some who feel targeted, discriminated against, and not viewed fairly they took it upon themselves to prove their loyalty and love of this country. And by God they sure as hell did. So much so that not only did they earn countless medals, but also the respect and admiration of Generals and peers. This is definitely lost to history, guess we can't have people talk about how these brave men responded to real racism, intolerance and having everything taken from them. How they took it upon themselves to prove their love of Country. That wouldn't play into the entire victim hood mentality.

And, for what it's worth Noriyuki(Pat) Morita's Mr. Miyagi character was Okinawan, a medal of Honor winner and member of the 442nd.
His character talks about Okinawa and in one of the movies returns to Okinawa, and in one of the movies it shows him with his medal of Honor, other awards and some other stuff showing 442nd. The only thing I can't put together is how his wife and child where killed during WWII if he was serving in the Army.

Oki
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