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#21 User is offline   Ticked@TinselTown 

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 11:57 PM

School is supposed to be a place of education, first and foremost.

They took prayer out of public schools to preserve the division between church and state.

They need to take forced agendas out of public schools as well.

They should concentrate on teaching children how to read, write, add, subtract, the basics.

They should NOT be incorporation sexual lifestyle education into the curriculum at any level, especially in the lower grades, because that is not education, that is indoctrination.

We have seen textbooks chopped up and edited to fit an agenda, and that agenda is NOT educating children in a well rounded way, it is to allow them to only know what a select and one sided group wants them to know, which, again, is NOT education, it is indoctrination.

Substitute teachers are temporary, but the problem in the public school system is a constant.
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#22 User is offline   Ladybird 

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 11:19 AM

View PostItalian Biker, on 02 December 2019 - 09:20 PM, said:

I didn't ask about parents or students ojections. I asked what you felt about it.


If it's a marriage & family type of course, no.
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#23 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:28 PM

View PostTicked@TinselTown, on 02 December 2019 - 11:57 PM, said:

School is supposed to be a place of education, first and foremost.

They took prayer out of public schools to preserve the division between church and state.

They need to take forced agendas out of public schools as well.

They should concentrate on teaching children how to read, write, add, subtract, the basics.

They should NOT be incorporation sexual lifestyle education into the curriculum at any level, especially in the lower grades, because that is not education, that is indoctrination.

We have seen textbooks chopped up and edited to fit an agenda, and that agenda is NOT educating children in a well rounded way, it is to allow them to only know what a select and one sided group wants them to know, which, again, is NOT education, it is indoctrination.

Substitute teachers are temporary, but the problem in the public school system is a constant.


I have no disagreement whatsoever with this.
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#24 User is offline   Italian Biker 

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 12:42 PM

View PostLadybird, on 03 December 2019 - 11:19 AM, said:

If it's a marriage & family type of course, no.

So would you have an objection to a school objecting to gay marriage and using it as part of their curriculum?
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#25 User is offline   Ladybird 

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 01:30 PM

View PostItalian Biker, on 04 December 2019 - 12:42 PM, said:

So would you have an objection to a school objecting to gay marriage and using it as part of their curriculum?

If it was a US public school, yes I would object. Private schools can teach whatever they want. There are private religious schools which exclude and expel students whose parents are gay. I think it’s messed up, but then I wouldn’t send my kid to one with those rules.

This post has been edited by Ladybird: 04 December 2019 - 02:11 PM

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#26 User is offline   scotsman 

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Posted 07 December 2019 - 10:17 AM

View PostLadybird, on 02 December 2019 - 08:22 PM, said:

ok thanks. So this was in the UK and, unless I'm mistaken, is a private school that has a curriculum the parents approve.



Where is the objections coming from, parents of students or people on social media?


Primary, not private. Primary schools, most of which are state-run, are what we Brits go to from the ages of 5-11. Then we go to secondary school, from ages 12-16/17/18. Up to 16 is mandatory, you can leave at 16 or 17 and either go to work, go to local college, or at 17, apply for university.

We don't have any of the junior/senior high school stuff or grades, which can confuse us when we hear it on US tv and film. For me, I simply add the grade number to 5 and work out immediately what age the student in the tv/film is. I assume US children start formal education at age 5, like us.

As to curriculums, as state schools, they will teach a nationally approved one. This till allows for the individual teacher to have their own little exercises, which is what the teacher in this case did. It wasn't part of the official teaching. The school sounds very progressive re LBGTQ and sounds as if it greatly supplements the national LBGTQ teachings, which for UK kids 5-11 is very basic.
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#27 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 07 December 2019 - 12:28 PM

View Postscotsman, on 07 December 2019 - 10:17 AM, said:

Primary, not private. Primary schools, most of which are state-run, are what we Brits go to from the ages of 5-11. Then we go to secondary school, from ages 12-16/17/18. Up to 16 is mandatory, you can leave at 16 or 17 and either go to work, go to local college, or at 17, apply for university.

We don't have any of the junior/senior high school stuff or grades, which can confuse us when we hear it on US tv and film. For me, I simply add the grade number to 5 and work out immediately what age the student in the tv/film is. I assume US children start formal education at age 5, like us.

As to curriculums, as state schools, they will teach a nationally approved one. This till allows for the individual teacher to have their own little exercises, which is what the teacher in this case did. It wasn't part of the official teaching. The school sounds very progressive re LBGTQ and sounds as if it greatly supplements the national LBGTQ teachings, which for UK kids 5-11 is very basic.


It's important to keep in mind that this was a substitute teacher, not the regular teacher of this class. It sounds to me like the sub went way beyond the bounds established by the regular teacher and the school itself.

B)
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#28 User is offline   scotsman 

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Posted 07 December 2019 - 10:13 PM


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#29 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 03:27 PM

View Postscotsman, on 07 December 2019 - 10:17 AM, said:

We don't have any of the junior/senior high school stuff or grades, which can confuse us when we hear it on US tv and film. For me, I simply add the grade number to 5 and work out immediately what age the student in the tv/film is. I assume US children start formal education at age 5, like us.


Age 6 for the first numbered grade - "First Grade" - which in most place is also both the first mandatory year AND the first "All Day" year.

Before that is "Kindergarten" starting at ~age 5 - The "K" in the "K-12" system as it's called in the US. But while (At least here in Georgia and Florida) and maybe mostly elsewhere, the public school districts are all required to offer Kindergarten but it's not required to attend. And, at least when I went, it was only 1/2 a day, you were either "morning" or "afternoon".

"Elementary School" or "Grade School" or (archaically) "Grammar School" is Grades 1 through 6. I *think* that's true throughout the USA.

"Junior High" is usually grades 7-8 though in some places is 7-8-9 and in some places is called "Middle School". My recollection is that districts used to call it Jr High if it was only 7-8 and Middle School if it was 7-8-9 combined, but I don't think that's strictly true any more.

"High School" ends with grade 12, which means at age 18 or close to it. I don't know about ALL High Schools, but mine based graduation on the number of "credits": x number of "core" credits and x number of "electives". Work hard, take some advanced classes, and it's sometimes possible to graduate early. And the end of 11th grade I was just 1 or 2 credits shy of graduating; As I recall I would have need to take classes that spring semester that were only taught in the fall semester. But others on different paths have done it. First semester of 12th grade I went for 3 or 4 hours a day. I couldn't get the classes I needed together so I was a "Library Assistant" in between, then I graduated "Mid-Term".

Cumpulsory education ends at age 16, I think everywhere in the USA (I could be wrong). But unless you're dropping out to work on the Family Farm or Family Business, it makes you all but unemployable. In Indiana back then anyone under 18 working a non-farm/non-family job needed a "Work Permit for Minors". Nominally these were issued by the school districts, but in our small town were handled by the Police Chief who was also a bigwig on the school board. He didn't take kindly to dropouts unless it was for a darned good reason. Consequently the graduation rate from my former High School is 97.2%; compare to 84.6% for the USA as a whole or a dismal 77% in the Atlanta area.

This post has been edited by Dean Adam Smithee: 08 December 2019 - 06:51 PM

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#30 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 06:35 PM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 08 December 2019 - 03:27 PM, said:

"Junior High" is usually grades 7-8 though in some places is 7-8-9 and in some places is called "Middle School". My recollection is that districts used to call it Jr High if it was only 7-8 and Middle School if it was 7-8-9 combined, but I don't think that's strictly true any more.


In my school district in the 60s-70s it was called "Junior High" and covered all three years: 7th 8th & 9th. 10th grade was the first year of "High School".

B)
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#31 User is offline   scotsman 

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 06:35 PM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 08 December 2019 - 03:27 PM, said:

Age 6 for the first numbered grade - "First Grade" - which in most place is also both the first mandatory year AND the first "All Day" year.

Before that is "Kindergarten" starting at ~age 5 - The "K" in the "K-12" system as it's called in the US. But while (At least here in Georgia and Florida) and maybe mostly elsewhere, the public school districts are all required to offer Kindergarten but it's not required to attend. And, at least when I went, it was only 1/2 a day, you were either "morning" or "afternoon".

"Elementary School" or "Grade School" or (archaically) "Grammar School" is Grades 1 through 6. I *think* that's true throughout the USA.

"Junior High" is usually grades 7-8 though in some places is 7-8-9 and in some places is called "Middle School". My recollection is that districts used to call it Jr High if it was only 7-8 and Middle School if it was 7-8-9 combined, but I don't think that's strictly true any more.

"High School" ends with grade 12, which means at age 18 or close to it. I don't know about ALL High Schools, but mine based graduation on the number of "credits": x number of "core" credits and x number of "electives". Work hard, take some advanced classes, and it's sometimes possible to graduate early. And the end of 11th grade I was just 1 or 2 credits shy of graduating; As I recall I would have need to take classes that spring semester that were only taught in the fall semester. But others on different paths have done it. First semester of 12th grade I went for 3 or 4 hours a day. I couldn't get the classes I needed together so I was a "Library Assistant" in between, then I graduated "Mid-Term".

Cumpulsory education ends at age 16, I think everywhere in the USA (I could be wrong). But unless you're dropping out to work on the Family Farm or Family Business, it makes you all but unemployable. In Indiana back then anyone under 18 working a non-farm/non-family job needed a "Work Permit for Minors". Nominally these were issued by the school districts, but in our small town were handled by the Police Chief who was also a bigwig on the school board. He didn't take kindly to dropouts unless it was for a darned good reason. Consequently the graduation rate from my former High School 16 97.2%; compare to 84.6% for the USA as a whole or a dismal 77% in the Atlanta area.


Ah, ok, I was close though lol.

Ach, seems awfy pure complicated, so it does. :D
Think I prefer oors.

Nursery (kindergarten) isn't compulsory here either, but the vast majority do go. Private, local council or church-run.

This post has been edited by scotsman: 08 December 2019 - 06:37 PM

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#32 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 07:21 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 08 December 2019 - 06:35 PM, said:

In my school district in the 60s-70s it was called "Junior High" and covered all three years: 7th 8th & 9th. 10th grade was the first year of "High School".

B)


So were you still call "Freshmen" in 9'th?

For me buildup to going from 8th to 9th was terrifying. Wild stories of having to run "gauntlets" down the hallway amongst "Seniors" with their "Senior paddles".

REALITY was different. First day was like any other school day wherever. Signed up for Tennis and Track. Got welcomed aboard as "Frosh" on both. And it's NOT because I was a "Star" LOL. I was merely "competant": I was your basic middle-of-the rung player that nobody would get excited about.
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#33 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 07:56 PM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 08 December 2019 - 07:21 PM, said:

So were you still call "Freshmen" in 9'th?

For me buildup to going from 8th to 9th was terrifying. Wild stories of having to run "gauntlets" down the hallway amongst "Seniors" with their "Senior paddles".

REALITY was different. First day was like any other school day wherever. Signed up for Tennis and Track. Got welcomed aboard as "Frosh" on both. And it's NOT because I was a "Star" LOL. I was merely "competant": I was your basic middle-of-the rung player that nobody would get excited about.


Nope, I never heard the term "Freshman" except as reference to first-year college students. We did use the terms "sophomore", "junior" and "senior" in high school, because it covered all three years. But being the big dogs on jr high campus (9th grade), nobody dared call us anything other than "sir".

;)
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#34 User is offline   Ticked@TinselTown 

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 11:04 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 08 December 2019 - 07:56 PM, said:

Nope, I never heard the term "Freshman" except as reference to first-year college students. We did use the terms "sophomore", "junior" and "senior" in high school, because it covered all three years. But being the big dogs on jr high campus (9th grade), nobody dared call us anything other than "sir".

;)


That was what they called us in high school when I went in 1980. 9th thru 12th was high school. 7th and 8th was junior high.

Charmingly enough, my freshman year I was told by an upper classman that the pecking order in the school was that freshmen were worms, sophomores were dirt, juniors were grass and seniors were the sky.
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#35 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 02:42 AM

View PostTicked@TinselTown, on 08 December 2019 - 11:04 PM, said:

That was what they called us in high school when I went in 1980. 9th thru 12th was high school. 7th and 8th was junior high.

Charmingly enough, my freshman year I was told by an upper classman that the pecking order in the school was that freshmen were worms, sophomores were dirt, juniors were grass and seniors were the sky.


I've never understood why some school systems divide junior & senior high school into two years and four years. Three & three is so much better balanced.

:shrug:
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#36 User is offline   JerryL 

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 03:09 AM

View PostMontyPython, on 08 December 2019 - 07:56 PM, said:

Nope, I never heard the term "Freshman" except as reference to first-year college students. We did use the terms "sophomore", "junior" and "senior" in high school, because it covered all three years. But being the big dogs on jr high campus (9th grade), nobody dared call us anything other than "sir".

;)

Same set up as you, Monty, but we did call 9th graders freshmen.
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#37 User is offline   searcher 

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 11:38 AM

I went to a Catholic school through grade 8. then to Jr. High for 9. then High school for 10-12.

Mark
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#38 User is offline   Ladybird 

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 11:54 AM

View Postsearcher, on 09 December 2019 - 11:38 AM, said:

I went to a Catholic school through grade 8. then to Jr. High for 9. then High school for 10-12.

Mark

That makes sense. I went to ‘middle school’ in the 6th grade, and then high school in the 9th grade. Mixing kids who are not just emotionally less mature, but physically much smaller was never a good idea. There was bullying and sexual harassment of girls by students who were practically adults.
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#39 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 12:24 PM

View PostJerryL, on 09 December 2019 - 03:09 AM, said:

Same set up as you, Monty, but we did call 9th graders freshmen.


Eastern WA, right?

Seems to me if some 7th or 8th grader had dared to call me a "freshman" I'd have punched him.

:shrug:
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#40 User is offline   Dutch13 

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 12:44 PM

View PostDJGoody, on 02 December 2019 - 01:16 PM, said:

What a psycho! Agree or not with homosexuality, just nod your head and move on to the next student.


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