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#1 User is offline   Liz 

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 01:15 AM

New Study Suggests Stress-Sleeping Is How Your Body Repairs DNA

Observer
By Francesca Friday
12/29/17 7:30am

Excerpt:

Ever spend a sleepless night staring at the ceiling, stressful thoughts keeping you awake into the early hours—or log a full 10 hours and feel like you haven’t slept in days? Stress and sleep are deeply intertwined, although little research has been done on the subject. A new study, published by the Genetics Society of America investigated stress-induced sleep in the nematode worms (Caenorhabditis elegans), uncovering data that suggests stress-induced sleep could be the body’s way of facilitating cellular repair after potentially stressful or traumatic events.

The researchers used Ultraviolet C Radiation (UVC) as a stressor, discovering that when the worms were exposed to the light, they initially wriggled more, overcome with stress, and then quickly fell asleep. To make sure the worms were actually asleep, the team tested them with octanol vapor, a chemical which would cause any wakeful worms to recoil in nausea. Because the radiation causes harm to worms’ DNA, the team hypothesized that the worms’ sleepy response was a way to quickly and efficiently rebuild broken DNA proteins.

"Stress-induced sleep (SIS) in Caenorhabditis elegans is important for restoration of cellular homeostasis and is a useful model to study the function and regulation of sleep,” writes lead study author Hilary K. DeBardeleben, Professor of Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. “SIS is triggered when epidermal growth factor (EGF) activates the ALA neuron, which then releases neuropeptides to promote sleep.”

Humans also experience a similar response to intense radiation; for example, cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy for various cancers respond with overwhelming sensations of fatigue.

*snip*

Sleep has been proven in humans to assist the facilitation of muscle repair, memory consolidation, judgment, and mood, but this new research identifies a previously unexplored connection between sleep and the body’s ability to rebuild itself after exposure to significant trauma. The feeling of exhaustion that follows a particularly stressful day may be your body’s way of telling you it needs extra time to focus on repairing itself, a survival mechanism to combat even more stressors that lie ahead.

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#2 User is offline   pict 

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 05:26 AM

I think working under stress is more exhausting than hard manual work.

This post has been edited by pict: 30 December 2017 - 07:26 AM

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#3 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 09:46 AM

The nematodes aren't dead, they're resting.
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#4 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 01:45 PM

View PostSeverian, on 30 December 2017 - 09:46 AM, said:

The nematodes aren't dead, they're resting.


Look mate - I know a dead nematode when I see one, and I'm lookin' at one right now.

;)
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#5 User is offline   Ticked@TinselTown 

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 05:59 PM

When I was sleeping on a chair or on a sofa in my mother's various hospital rooms for the past two and a half months, I never felt like I got any sleep at all because any sound would wake me, either from my mother needing something or someone coming to the doorway of her room or coming in to wake her up to ask if she wanted to be turned.

Despite feeling like I hadn't gotten any sleep, I still managed to function reasonably well during the 'awake' hours and when I would pull 30+ awake and would try to get some sleep, sleep would elude me because I was too tired to sleep.

I think that the human body is a truly marvelous machine that has all of the necessary systems in place to cure itself of anything and to accomplish anything that, at this point in time, seems entirely impossible.

It's a matter of understanding how and where to find the keys to unlocking the portions of our own bodies and using them to achieve the goals we need to reach, whether in healing ourselves, improving our performance mentally or physical or both, for the short term or long term, or extending our lifespan.

All of it is locked away inside us, but the question of how to find the keys to those mysteries is the biggest mystery of all.

And it also points to some deeply ethical questions that require a lot of soul searching.
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#6 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 07:11 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 30 December 2017 - 01:45 PM, said:

Look mate - I know a dead nematode when I see one, and I'm lookin' at one right now.

;)

No no, nematodes prefer kipping on their backs. Beautiful plumage.
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#7 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 07:33 PM

View PostSeverian, on 30 December 2017 - 07:11 PM, said:

No no, nematodes prefer kipping on their backs. Beautiful plumage.


The plumage don't enter into it! 'e's bleedin' demised!

:D
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#8 User is offline   dan r 

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 02:26 PM

View Postpict, on 30 December 2017 - 05:26 AM, said:

I think working under stress is more exhausting than hard manual work.

Having spent the first decade of my adult life doing the latter and the last 6 years the former, I couldn’t agree more. Pays more though.
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#9 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 03:14 PM

View Postdan, on 31 December 2017 - 02:26 PM, said:

Having spent the first decade of my adult life doing the latter and the last 6 years the former, I couldn’t agree more. Pays more though.

That it does, but stress can be a killer, especially coupled with sedentary desk work. When I worked at one big aerospace firm, they used to carry at least one person a month out feet first. I was on one proposal effort, 90-100 hour weeks, and in two and a half months three people died, one of leukemia, one of a ruptured ulcer, one of a massive heart attack. When an old buddy of mine, now retired, came up to visit, I stopped asking him about people we both knew. Out of about 15, 12 were dead, mostly from stress related conditions like heart, strokes, etc. He himself was only alive because when he crossed home plate playing softball with his league, his heart stopped, and fortunately for him the two folks up to bat next were a cop who'd just finished CPR training and an EMT.

I worked 80-100 hours a week there once for three and a half months, long hours, very high stress. Sunday was my short day, only 12 hours. After that I got physically ill, not much specific, but just hammered, fatigue, etc. like every system in my body was out of whack. I think I slept for most of two days before even being able to move. So, yeah, stress can be a bear. Unfortunately my career seems to have careened from too much stress to complete boredom, back and forth like a game of ping pong. Never that Goldilocks area of juuuust right.
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#10 User is offline   dan r 

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 04:24 PM

View PostSeverian, on 31 December 2017 - 03:14 PM, said:

That it does, but stress can be a killer, especially coupled with sedentary desk work. When I worked at one big aerospace firm, they used to carry at least one person a month out feet first. I was on one proposal effort, 90-100 hour weeks, and in two and a half months three people died, one of leukemia, one of a ruptured ulcer, one of a massive heart attack. When an old buddy of mine, now retired, came up to visit, I stopped asking him about people we both knew. Out of about 15, 12 were dead, mostly from stress related conditions like heart, strokes, etc. He himself was only alive because when he crossed home plate playing softball with his league, his heart stopped, and fortunately for him the two folks up to bat next were a cop who'd just finished CPR training and an EMT.

I worked 80-100 hours a week there once for three and a half months, long hours, very high stress. Sunday was my short day, only 12 hours. After that I got physically ill, not much specific, but just hammered, fatigue, etc. like every system in my body was out of whack. I think I slept for most of two days before even being able to move. So, yeah, stress can be a bear. Unfortunately my career seems to have careened from too much stress to complete boredom, back and forth like a game of ping pong. Never that Goldilocks area of juuuust right.

I hear you. Besides the long hours, the hard deadlines, the intense pressure and fear of one mistake that can cost hundreds of thousands or more (and of course, your job), I think one of the hardest parts is the fact that you never go home feeling like your work is done; there’s always a list of things left to do. Things that wake you up at night. Nightmares about work. It is what it is.
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#11 User is offline   dan r 

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 04:33 PM

But of course, I only have the position and pay I have because the system is rigged and I have privilege. I sincerely apologize for any success I’ve had. I clearly don’t deserve it. My family shouldn’t have any time with me. I’m sorry everybody.
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