RightNation.US
News (Home) | Righters' Blog | Hollywood Halfwits | Our Store | New User Intro | Link to us | Support Us

RightNation.US: Warren releases results of DNA test (Merged) - RightNation.US

Jump to content

Warren releases results of DNA test (Merged) Cherokee Nation issues statement on Sen. Elizabeth Warren's DNA Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Gertie Keddle 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Platinum
  • Posts: 21,266
  • Joined: 12-August 03

  Posted 15 October 2018 - 06:30 AM


Warren releases results of DNA test


By Annie Linskey Globe Staff October 15, 2018
Excerpt:

WASHINGTON — Senator Elizabeth Warren has released a DNA test that provides “strong evidence’’ she had a Native American in her family tree dating back 6 to 10 generations, an unprecedented move by one of the top possible contenders for the 2020 Democratic nomination for president.

Warren, whose claims to Native American blood have been mocked by President Trump and other Republicans, provided the test results to the Globe on Sunday in an effort to defuse questions about her ancestry that have persisted for years. She planned an elaborate rollout Monday of the results as she aimed for widespread attention.

The analysis of Warren’s DNA was done by Carlos D. Bustamante, a Stanford University professor and expert in the field who won a 2010 MacArthur fellowship, also known as a genius grant, for his work on tracking population migration via DNA analysis.

He concluded that “the vast majority” of Warren’s ancestry is European, but he added that “the results strongly support the existence of an unadmixed Native American ancestor.”

Bustamante calculated that Warren’s pure Native American ancestor appears in her family tree “in the range of 6-10 generations ago.” That timing fits Warren’s family lore, passed down during her Oklahoma upbringing, that her great-great-great-grandmother, O.C. Sarah Smith, was at least partially Native American.

Smith was born in the late 1700s. She identified as white in historical documents, though at the time Indians faced discrimination, and Smith would have had strong incentives to call herself white if possible.

The inherent imprecision of the six-page DNA analysis could provide fodder for Warren’s critics. If her great-great-great-grandmother was Native American, that puts her at 1/32nd American Indian. But the report includes the possibility that she’s just 1/512th Native American if the ancestor is 10 generations back.

Article
0

#2 User is offline   Gertie Keddle 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Platinum
  • Posts: 21,266
  • Joined: 12-August 03

Posted 15 October 2018 - 06:48 AM

Someone with more medical knowledge than me (i.e., anyone): How does DNA analysis translate to genealogy? How do you get from chromosomes to a specific number of generations where that variation entered the DNA?

Here's more from the article on the "sciencey" bits:

Warren said she was committed to releasing the report regardless of the results. However, Warren’s aides would not say whether she or any of her three siblings had previously done a commercial DNA test that would have provided them with some assurance about Bustamante’s analysis.

There were five parts of Warren’s DNA that signaled she had a Native American ancestor, according to the report. The largest piece of Native American DNA was found on her 10th chromosome, according to the report. Each human has 23 pairs of chromosomes.

“It really stood out,” said Bustamante in an interview. “We found five segments, and that long segment was pretty significant. It tells us about one ancestor, and we can’t rule out more ancestors.”

He added: “We are confident it is not an error.”

Detecting DNA for Native Americans is particularly tricky because there is an absence of Native American DNA available for comparison. This is in part because Native American leaders have asked tribal members not to participate in genetic databases.

“The tribes have felt they have been exploited,” explained Lawrence Brody, a senior investigator with the Medical Genomics and Metabolic Genetics Branch at the National Institutes of Health. “The amount of genetic data that is available from Native Americans is sparse.”

To make up for the dearth of Native American DNA, Bustamante used samples from Mexico, Peru, and Colombia to stand in for Native American. That’s because scientists believe that the groups Americans refer to as Native American came to this land via the Bering Straight about 12,000 years ago and settled in what’s now America but also migrated further south. His report explained that the use of reference populations whose genetic material has been fully sequenced was designed “for maximal accuracy.”

Bustamante said he can tease out the markers that these South Americans would have in common with Native Americans on the North American continent.

Bustamante also compared Warren’s DNA to white populations in Utah and Great Britain to determine if the amounts of Native American markers in Warren’s sample were significant or just background noise.

Warren has 12 times more Native American blood than a white person from Great Britain and 10 times more than a white person from Utah, the report found.


In other words, she won't say how many tests she had to have before she found someone who would back her up by saying he found a big honkin' chunk of Native American DNA right there on chromosome 10, except that no one knows what Native American DNA looks like, so he made it up a little like Richard Attenborough using frog DNA to sub in the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park and we all know how that worked out.
0

#3 User is offline   Wag-a-Muffin (D) 

  • Still clinging bitterly. . .
  • View blog
  • Group: Blog Moderator
  • Posts: 18,932
  • Joined: 03-November 04

Posted 15 October 2018 - 07:31 AM

I've stated before that my husband's maternal grandmother was 1/2 Cree. We have government documents, photos, and a family tree and all verify this. Her husband was a French Canadian fur trapper. Her mother was full Cree. HOWEVER, before he took (one of the most popular and respected) DNA test one of the questions he was asked was "do you have Native American ancestry?" He didn't answer the question because (in his words) "that's what they were supposed to tell me."
When we got the results there were NO evidence of Native American blood in his DNA.

We did some research and found that this DNA mapping is not as conclusive as we thought. That it is very tricky to verify "first Nation" ancestry.

IF he had marked, "yes. I have Native American blood" (or whatever the actual question was--I don't remember) it is ALMOST a given that the DNA test would have confirmed that.

I believe this is what Elizabeth Warren did. She took the test, but gave them information beforehand that yes, they were going to find Native American blood. And so they did.
0

#4 User is offline   Taggart Transcontinental 

  • <no title>
  • View gallery
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 25,730
  • Joined: 22-October 03

Posted 15 October 2018 - 07:43 AM

Anyone's who's family has been here since the Mayflower is in fact probably 1-2% indian. That does not mean you qualify for government support as a member of a tribe. Guess what. THEY HAD SEX with Indian's back then. That means some of them are children of those genes. It does not mean. you are a member of the X Tribe in good standing. I run my DNA it's probably going to indicate I am 1/1000th Chinese. It does not mean that I am a member of the Chinese Royal Family, from the Xi Dynasty.
0

#5 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

  • <no title>
  • View gallery
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 33,976
  • Joined: 13-January 04

Posted 15 October 2018 - 07:47 AM

View PostTaggart Transcontinental, on 15 October 2018 - 07:43 AM, said:

Anyone's who's family has been here since the Mayflower is in fact probably 1-2% indian. That does not mean you qualify for government support as a member of a tribe. Guess what. THEY HAD SEX with Indian's back then. That means some of them are children of those genes. It does not mean. you are a member of the X Tribe in good standing. I run my DNA it's probably going to indicate I am 1/1000th Chinese. It does not mean that I am a member of the Chinese Royal Family, from the Xi Dynasty.


I ran mine last year. I am 99% northern European and 1% eastern European. So I'm British royalty. Everyone needs to kneel down in front me. We'll start with Kate Beckinsale...
0

#6 User is offline   Severian 

  • Order of the Seekers for Truth & Penitence
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 13,022
  • Joined: 14-February 04

Posted 15 October 2018 - 07:49 AM

Yeah, pull the other one, it's got bells on it. A manufactured test and result to try and tamp one of her legion of lies down before she runs for president.
0

#7 User is offline   Ben Cranklin 

  • Satiric Curmudgeon
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 6,104
  • Joined: 27-June 03

Posted 15 October 2018 - 07:52 AM

In other words, she has no more Native American in her than just about anyone else who has been here for at least "6 to 10" generations. And that's if you even believe this specially commissioned test she had privately done. I wonder how it would compare to a blind study.

This post has been edited by Ben Cranklin: 15 October 2018 - 07:54 AM

0

#8 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

  • <no title>
  • View gallery
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 33,976
  • Joined: 13-January 04

Posted 15 October 2018 - 07:55 AM

View PostBen Cranklin, on 15 October 2018 - 07:52 AM, said:

I wonder how it would compare to a blind study.


Are you referring to the first seven DNA tests she had done that provided negative results?
0

#9 User is online   zurg 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 25,299
  • Joined: 19-October 09

Posted 15 October 2018 - 07:55 AM

So. Warren supposedly had ONE Native American in her family 6-10 generations ago. Since every generation dilutes the heritage by half, an Nth generation is diluted by 1/2^N.

Going with the average (8th generation), Warren is 1/256th Native American. That’s why they call her Fauxcahontas.
0

#10 User is offline   Hieronymous 

  • Men with ropes around their necks don't always hang
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 8,373
  • Joined: 16-April 09

Posted 15 October 2018 - 08:01 AM

My paternal grandmother's grandmother was a full blooded Cherokee. That means nothing to me. Human beings are all part of one race and one race only.
0

#11 User is offline   67Mustang 

  • <no title>
  • Group: 100+ Posts NonDonor
  • Posts: 1,048
  • Joined: 06-April 10

Posted 15 October 2018 - 08:14 AM

I note that the Native Americans haven't rushed to claim kin.
0

#12 User is offline   Ladybird 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 15,054
  • Joined: 26-October 07

Posted 15 October 2018 - 08:25 AM

View PostWag-a-Muffin (D), on 15 October 2018 - 07:31 AM, said:

I've stated before that my husband's maternal grandmother was 1/2 Cree. We have government documents, photos, and a family tree and all verify this. Her husband was a French Canadian fur trapper. Her mother was full Cree. HOWEVER, before he took (one of the most popular and respected) DNA test one of the questions he was asked was "do you have Native American ancestry?" He didn't answer the question because (in his words) "that's what they were supposed to tell me."
When we got the results there were NO evidence of Native American blood in his DNA.

We did some research and found that this DNA mapping is not as conclusive as we thought. That it is very tricky to verify "first Nation" ancestry.

IF he had marked, "yes. I have Native American blood" (or whatever the actual question was--I don't remember) it is ALMOST a given that the DNA test would have confirmed that.

I believe this is what Elizabeth Warren did. She took the test, but gave them information beforehand that yes, they were going to find Native American blood. And so they did.

Same here. My great great grandmother was Irish and Seminole. I have a picture of her. That’s just my mother’s side, there’s much more on my father’s. The dna test showed a mish mosh of African and European ancestors, and 7% under the category ‘Asian’.


Has Warren claimed any tribal benefits or taken a scholarship away from a native American?

This post has been edited by Ladybird: 15 October 2018 - 09:28 AM

0

#13 User is online   zurg 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 25,299
  • Joined: 19-October 09

Posted 15 October 2018 - 08:47 AM

View PostLadybird, on 15 October 2018 - 08:25 AM, said:

Has Warren claimed any tribal benefits or taken a scholarship away from a native American?

Benefits - she got her position at Harvard based at least to some part due to her native status claim. I haven’t heard about benefits from the government.

Competitive with other native Americans - I haven’t heard this claim but I don’t know how one would prove it anyway. Maybe an accusation would be enough these days?
0

#14 User is offline   Gertie Keddle 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Platinum
  • Posts: 21,266
  • Joined: 12-August 03

Posted 15 October 2018 - 08:58 AM

That Harvard Law claimed her as their "first woman of color" tells you everything you need to know about their true opinions of diversity.
0

#15 User is offline   Vandervecken 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 1,036
  • Joined: 09-November 16

Posted 15 October 2018 - 09:18 AM

I'm about that much Romany according to an analysis I had done. Guess that makes me an Indian too.
0

#16 User is offline   oki 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 23,775
  • Joined: 14-October 04

Posted 15 October 2018 - 09:33 AM

If this is how it works then every car made would be a Corvette, Benz, Cadillac, or what ever you want it to be simply because they shared the same oil, spark plugs or anti freeze. As human beings we share a certain amount of D.N.A. no matter your biological origin. Regional origins are a lot trickier especially considering that know there is a belief a number of people floated on ice from Europe to North America during the last ice age.
Plus, if Native American's/Indians did in fact first originate from Asia wouldn't that make them Asian genetically? Yeah... it ain't so simple.

But then again if your a Dem or lefty, even if your white as a Ghost, never faced any discrimination what so ever in your life, even one possible drop of minority blood will still make you a victim and hero to some.

Oki
0

#17 User is offline   Natural Selection 

  • Decrypt the truth
  • Group: Bronze
  • Posts: 16,984
  • Joined: 31-December 03

Posted 15 October 2018 - 09:37 AM

So no family tree available? Just some unknown DNA guy to back up her Mother's story?

Nancy Reagan is a direct descendant of Pocahontas and the family tree showing the progression is available HERE.

I don't remember Nancy Reagan ever using her Indian ancestry for anything. I don't think she even mentioned it. Class act.

Edited to add:
Ignore the "adopted daughter" note. Edith Prescott Davis is Nancy Reagan's biological Mother.

This post has been edited by Natural Selection: 15 October 2018 - 09:52 AM

0

#18 User is offline   Gertie Keddle 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Platinum
  • Posts: 21,266
  • Joined: 12-August 03

Posted 15 October 2018 - 10:01 AM

Elizabeth Warren’s DNA Test Proves She Was Lying
Acting as if the results of the senator's DNA test are a vindication of her initial claims is an assault on reason.

By David Harsanyi
October 15, 2018
The Federalist
Excerpt:

Why did Sen. Elizabeth Warren spend all these years claiming to be a Native American?

One plausible answer might be that her family had lied to her, or were also misled about their heritage, and that Warren truly believed she was Cherokee. This happens relatively often, I suppose. Then again, few people exhibit as much certitude, and gain as many benefits, over a claim that’s so obscure and unverifiable.

The second is that Warren herself lied or exaggerated her heritage, knowing full well that her contention of Cherokee ancestry was likely nothing more than lore, then latched on to this negligible ancestry to gain traction in an academic field that was searching for candidates of specific races.

We now know that the second option is more probable after the prospective presidential candidate decided to make a huge deal out of taking a DNA test, that, in reality, proves she is as white as I am. The ludicrously unskeptical Boston Globe story about Warren’s dramatic decision to take the test begins by contending there’s “strong evidence’’ of Warren’s Native American’s ancestry dating back 6 to 10 generations—which creates the impression that she has Native American family littered over the past 100 years.

In truth, we learn, it’s possible that Warren’s great-great-great-grandmother was partially Native American. This would make her around 1/32nd American Indian, a far cry from any reasonable threshold to embrace minority status for a job. That’s exactly what she did starting in the 1990s, before walking back her claims when it became politically expedient.

Then again, being 1/32 (and really, the math says 1/64th) Native American is the high-end possibility. It is just as possible that Warren 1/1,024th Native American. (The story intially claimed it was 1/512th.)

Maybe.

Whatever the number is, there’s little genetic data available from Native Americans because of fears of exploitation (Warren’s case might be good example of why). There is no way to break down the DNA into region or tribe. The DNA tests merely rely on some guesswork by referencing the DNA to people from South America.

The credulous reporter who wrote the Warren DNA piece didn’t do the math correctly (and this is before getting into why the particular test, which didn’t even use American Indian DNA to compare, was garbage). Six generations removed is 1/64. Ten removed is 1/1024 (0.098%).

— Sean Davis (@seanmdav) October 15, 2018

I don’t much care about Warren’s ethnicity, but she is not, in any genuine sense, a racial or ethnic minority. Not in blood. Not in experience. Under her standards, how many Americans would qualify as Native American? Or put it this way: is being 1/1,024th African enough to claim “minority” status in a professional setting? I’m asking for the liberals who believe race-based hiring is an important means of facilitating diversity and ensuring fairness.

We don’t fully know how important Warren’s claims were in her career. There is, however, much evidence that her self-driven minority claims in the 1990s were helpful. Warren, who once maintained her family had “high cheekbones like all of the Indians do,” was listed as a “minority faculty member” by The University of Pennsylvania. She had the school switch her designation from white to Native American. Warren self-identified as a “minority” in the legal directory, and Harvard Law School preposterously listed her as one of the “women of color” the school had hired. On job applications, Warren was very specific in claiming that she had Cherokee and Delaware Indian ancestry.

When her supposed Native American heritage came under scrutiny during her first Senate bid, Warren presented a recipe she had published in her cousin’s cookbook as evidence of her background. It was signed “Elizabeth Warren — Cherokee.” Later we learned that even the recipe was taken verbatim from an article in The New York Times five years earlier.

Article

This post has been edited by Gertie Keddle: 15 October 2018 - 10:02 AM

0

#19 User is offline   Joe the Pagan 

  • I'm a Whovian not a Dweeb
  • View blog
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 6,391
  • Joined: 02-November 03

Posted 15 October 2018 - 10:40 AM

View PostGertie Keddle, on 15 October 2018 - 06:48 AM, said:

Someone with more medical knowledge than me (i.e., anyone): How does DNA analysis translate to genealogy? How do you get from chromosomes to a specific number of generations where that variation entered the DNA?

Here's more from the article on the "sciencey" bits:

Warren said she was committed to releasing the report regardless of the results. However, Warren’s aides would not say whether she or any of her three siblings had previously done a commercial DNA test that would have provided them with some assurance about Bustamante’s analysis.

There were five parts of Warren’s DNA that signaled she had a Native American ancestor, according to the report. The largest piece of Native American DNA was found on her 10th chromosome, according to the report. Each human has 23 pairs of chromosomes.

“It really stood out,” said Bustamante in an interview. “We found five segments, and that long segment was pretty significant. It tells us about one ancestor, and we can’t rule out more ancestors.”

He added: “We are confident it is not an error.”

Detecting DNA for Native Americans is particularly tricky because there is an absence of Native American DNA available for comparison. This is in part because Native American leaders have asked tribal members not to participate in genetic databases.

“The tribes have felt they have been exploited,” explained Lawrence Brody, a senior investigator with the Medical Genomics and Metabolic Genetics Branch at the National Institutes of Health. “The amount of genetic data that is available from Native Americans is sparse.”

To make up for the dearth of Native American DNA, Bustamante used samples from Mexico, Peru, and Colombia to stand in for Native American. That’s because scientists believe that the groups Americans refer to as Native American came to this land via the Bering Straight about 12,000 years ago and settled in what’s now America but also migrated further south. His report explained that the use of reference populations whose genetic material has been fully sequenced was designed “for maximal accuracy.”

Bustamante said he can tease out the markers that these South Americans would have in common with Native Americans on the North American continent.

Bustamante also compared Warren’s DNA to white populations in Utah and Great Britain to determine if the amounts of Native American markers in Warren’s sample were significant or just background noise.

Warren has 12 times more Native American blood than a white person from Great Britain and 10 times more than a white person from Utah, the report found.


In other words, she won't say how many tests she had to have before she found someone who would back her up by saying he found a big honkin' chunk of Native American DNA right there on chromosome 10, except that no one knows what Native American DNA looks like, so he made it up a little like Richard Attenborough using frog DNA to sub in the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park and we all know how that worked out.


In his video Science for Smart people Tom Naughton gives the scientic definition of significant. It is not the same as the general definition of significant. It means he is 95% sure the results were not caused by random chance.


0

#20 User is online   Tikk 

  • Oh Rrrrrreeeaaaally?
  • Group: Bronze
  • Posts: 8,424
  • Joined: 16-December 03

Posted 15 October 2018 - 10:46 AM

:lol:

What 'cultural diversity' or 'different perspective' or 'overcoming racial obstacles' does she bring to the table by maybe one full blooded ancestor from 6 to 10 generations ago?

And that's IF the methodology used by this one guy is truthful or accurate.

Good Lord, these people have to rely on the abject stupidity of their base to keep office.
0

Share this topic:


  • 9 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • Last »
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

2 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users