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Atlas Slugged

Well I finally did it. I finally finished listening to the full unabridged audio of "Atlas Shrugged". I had read for years from other Conservatives and especially libertarians how inspirational and influential this book was to their core beliefs, particularly in how government should conduct itself. And often, these same folks were the ones who greatly influenced my beliefs by challenging me to 'check my premises'. Unfortunately, I did not end up loving the book as much as others, checked premises or not.

For those of you who don't know, "Atlas Shrugged" is a book about a society that totally demonizes capitalism and worships at the altar of socialism. It shows how easily a society can become one instead of the other. Mind you, it does start a ways down the road to socialism yet references at one point an event that was probably the beginning of it all.

Ayn Rand, the author of the book, is a brilliant writer. I was enraptured for weeks on end listening to her book. I have a near two hour commute each day and spent most of that time fully engrossed in Atlas. It was probably the first time in my life that I could hardly wait to go to work just so I could enter the world of Dagny Talbert and the rest of the producers.

The book is so long that it ended up taking me over two months to listen to it all. And yet, after devoting all of that time to it, I was so disgusted by one particular part that I nearly quit when I only had about five Cd's left. The part I did not like was during John Galt's speech. I did not like him when he started denigrating faith.

I thought I remembered from a long time ago someone warning me about "Atlas Shrugged" being anti-Christian. But when people started talking about it on the net, I asked someone about that and they pretty much dismissed that assessment. While they did tell me that Rand was not a believer, they made it sound like her unbelief was not a big part of this book.

And to be honest with you, it wasn't brought up all that much at all until the speech. Here is a link to the speech.

When Galt said the following:
“You have heard no concepts of morality but the mystical or the social. You have been taught that morality is a code of behavior imposed on you by whim, the whim of a supernatural power or the whim of society, to serve God’s purpose or your neighbor’s welfare, to please an authority beyond the grave or else next door-but not to serve your life or pleasure. Your pleasure, you have been taught, is to be found in immorality, your interests would best be served by evil, and any moral code must be designed not for you, but against you, not to further your life, but to drain it.

“For centuries, the battle of morality was fought between those who claimed that your life belongs to God and those who claimed that it belongs to your neighbors-between those who preached that the good is self-sacrifice for the sake of ghosts in heaven and those who preached that the good is self-sacrifice for the sake of incompetents on earth. And no one came to say that your life belongs to you and that the good is to live it.

“Both sides agreed that morality demands the surrender of your self-interest and of your mind, that the moral and the practical are opposites, that morality is not the province of reason, but the province of faith and force. Both sides agreed that no rational morality is possible, that there is no right or wrong in reason-that in reason there’s no reason to be moral.

“Whatever else they fought about, it was against man’s mind that all your moralists have stood united. It was man’s mind that all their schemes and systems were intended to despoil and destroy. Now choose to perish or to learn that the anti-mind is the anti-life.
It sure appeared to me that he was saying that believers in Christ were mindless zombies who could not think for themselves. Then he made a moral equivalency between faith and secular humanism.

I was hoping at that point, that he would soon change the subject since Rand had not been so strongly demeaning against faith previously, but Galt went on and on.


“Man’s life, as required by his nature, is not the life of a mindless brute, of a looting thug or a mooching mystic, but the life of a thinking being-not life by means of force or fraud, but life by means of achievement-not survival at any price, since there’s only one price that pays for man’s survival: reason.

“Man’s life is the standard of morality, but your own life is its purpose. If existence on earth is your goal, you must choose your actions and values by the standard of that which is proper to man-for the purpose of preserving, fulfilling and enjoying the irreplaceable value which is your life.

“Since life requires a specific course of action, any other course will destroy it. A being who does not hold his own life as the motive and goal of his actions, is acting on the motive and standard of death. Such a being is a metaphysical monstrosity, struggling to oppose, negate and contradict the fact of his own existence, running blindly amuck on a trail of destruction, capable of nothing but pain.

“Happiness is the successful state of life, pain is an agent of death. Happiness is that state of consciousness which proceeds from the achievement of one’s values. A morality that dares to tell you to find happiness in the renunciation of your happiness-to value the failure of your values-is an insolent negation of morality. A doctrine that gives you, as an ideal, the role of a sacrificial animal seeking slaughter on the altars of others, is giving you death as your standard. By the grace of reality and the nature of life, man-every man-is an end in himself, he exists for his own sake, and the achievement of his own happiness is his highest moral purpose.
While I can agree with the notion that man must be responsible for his own needs, I do not agree that happiness is gained by thinking of no one but yourself. And not every Pastor or Priest is a mooching mystic.

“What is the nature of the guilt that your teachers call his Original Sin? What are the evils man acquired when he fell from a state they consider perfection? Their myth declares that he ate the fruit of the tree of knowledge-he acquired a mind and became a rational being. It was the knowledge of good and evil-he became a mortal being. He was sentenced to earn his bread by his labor-he became a productive being. He was sentenced to experience desire-he acquired the capacity of sexual enjoyment. The evils for which they damn him are reason, morality, creativeness; joy-all the cardinal values of his existence. It is not his vices that their myth of man’s fall is designed to explain and condemn, it is not his errors that they hold as his guilt, but the essence of his nature as man. Whatever he was-that robot in the Garden of Eden, who existed without mind, without values, without labor, without love-he was not man.
And on and on and on he went. I was going to quote more but it would make this blog much too long to read.

One does not have to be a mindless robot to believe in God. One does not have to be an atheist to believe in hard work and being the proper recipient of the fruits of your labor. One does not have to be a non-believer to be a success in whatever field you so desire.

I have been taught that if you put garbage in, you get garbage out. That is the reason why I don't like to read such nonsense as the above. It's the same thing as watching porn all day and night. If you fill your head full of smut, your mind becomes nothing but mush.

The main reason I am posting this is not to complain about "Atlas Shrugged" since I do believe it is a book well worth reading, at least if you have reached a certain age where your mind is not so malleable. My purpose for posting this is to ask those of you who are believers who do love this book to help me to understand why these parts of Galt's speech did not bother you as much as they did me.

And for those of you who aren't believers and who also love this book, how old were you when you first read it and do you believe that it influenced you to not believe in God?

I wish it did not bother me so much because I sure would love to read more of Rand's books, but at this point in time, I just don't think they would be good for me.


Elusively yours,
ilja
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17 Comments On This Entry

Thanks for the review, Ilja! I'm one of those folks who has yet to read any of Ayn Rand's books, but I did have the pleasure of serving with a friend from my Navy days who picked up this book and was converted from an ACLU believing kool-aid drinker to a right-leaning fan of Thomas Sowell overnight. I wasn't very good with my faith in those days so we never really touched on the topic you mention, but I was convinced that whatever was in her books it must be impactful.
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I read from cover to cover and dismissed those parts as they do not apply. All else stands as great, and the few comments of Gualt do not make it any less a great book. It simply is a debating point for those who believe other than the same. I do think that Rands reason for making Gualt such a cynic is that it bring those in who have been subjected to humanism, includes those who do not believe. It seems everyone arrives at the same point [those who agree the book is one of the best ever written] via different paths.
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MrStain, on Jan 11 2009, 06:54 PM, said:

Thanks for the review, Ilja! I'm one of those folks who has yet to read any of Ayn Rand's books, but I did have the pleasure of serving with a friend from my Navy days who picked up this book and was converted from an ACLU believing kool-aid drinker to a right-leaning fan of Thomas Sowell overnight. I wasn't very good with my faith in those days so we never really touched on the topic you mention, but I was convinced that whatever was in her books it must be impactful.

That's just it. I do believe it is a great book for that purpose alone. I just wish it wasn't so anti-Christian in the speech. Maybe it's just me. That's part of why I'm asking. I want to know how others who believe as I do can enjoy Rand's books without letting her non-beliefs get in the way of their enjoyment.
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melissaTX, on Jan 11 2009, 07:03 PM, said:

I read from cover to cover and dismissed those parts as they do not apply. All else stands as great, and the few comments of Gualt do not make it any less a great book. It simply is a debating point for those who believe other than the same. I do think that Rands reason for making Gualt such a cynic is that it bring those in who have been subjected to humanism, includes those who do not believe. It seems everyone arrives at the same point [those who agree the book is one of the best ever written] via different paths.

I wonder if perhaps I had read it instead of listening to the audiobook if it would have been easier for me to overlook those parts? :hug:
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ilja, on Jan 11 2009, 05:43 PM, said:

melissaTX, on Jan 11 2009, 07:03 PM, said:

I read from cover to cover and dismissed those parts as they do not apply. All else stands as great, and the few comments of Gualt do not make it any less a great book. It simply is a debating point for those who believe other than the same. I do think that Rands reason for making Gualt such a cynic is that it bring those in who have been subjected to humanism, includes those who do not believe. It seems everyone arrives at the same point [those who agree the book is one of the best ever written] via different paths.

I wonder if perhaps I had read it instead of listening to the audiobook if it would have been easier for me to overlook those parts? :D

It probably would have. My dad read it years ago, and he said he skipped a lot of the speachmaking. I can't imagine my dad not even mentioning the anti-faith parts if he'd read them.

He's been trying to get me to read it, and I probably will some day. It's one of those things where so much other stuff comes up--even if it is crappy sci-fi like 1632. :D
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Mr. Naron, on Jan 11 2009, 08:16 PM, said:

ilja, on Jan 11 2009, 05:43 PM, said:

melissaTX, on Jan 11 2009, 07:03 PM, said:

I read from cover to cover and dismissed those parts as they do not apply. All else stands as great, and the few comments of Gualt do not make it any less a great book. It simply is a debating point for those who believe other than the same. I do think that Rands reason for making Gualt such a cynic is that it bring those in who have been subjected to humanism, includes those who do not believe. It seems everyone arrives at the same point [those who agree the book is one of the best ever written] via different paths.

I wonder if perhaps I had read it instead of listening to the audiobook if it would have been easier for me to overlook those parts? :D

It probably would have. My dad read it years ago, and he said he skipped a lot of the speachmaking. I can't imagine my dad not even mentioning the anti-faith parts if he'd read them.

He's been trying to get me to read it, and I probably will some day. It's one of those things where so much other stuff comes up--even if it is crappy sci-fi like 1632. :D

Well do like I did and listen to the audiobook. Oh, I forget. You dont' have that much time in the car, do you?

As for skipping the speechmaking, that would be a big part of the book. :D
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Mr. Naron, on Jan 11 2009, 07:16 PM, said:

ilja, on Jan 11 2009, 05:43 PM, said:

melissaTX, on Jan 11 2009, 07:03 PM, said:

I read from cover to cover and dismissed those parts as they do not apply. All else stands as great, and the few comments of Gualt do not make it any less a great book. It simply is a debating point for those who believe other than the same. I do think that Rands reason for making Gualt such a cynic is that it bring those in who have been subjected to humanism, includes those who do not believe. It seems everyone arrives at the same point [those who agree the book is one of the best ever written] via different paths.

I wonder if perhaps I had read it instead of listening to the audiobook if it would have been easier for me to overlook those parts? :D

It probably would have. My dad read it years ago, and he said he skipped a lot of the speachmaking. I can't imagine my dad not even mentioning the anti-faith parts if he'd read them.

He's been trying to get me to read it, and I probably will some day. It's one of those things where so much other stuff comes up--even if it is crappy sci-fi like 1632. :D

I pretty much skipped the speech as well. I started reading it, and saw it was just rehashing the themes of the book. So I figured, I can read the story or read the radio speech and get the same themes from the book. I also think the speech was badly placed. After reading hundreds of pages of story, and finally arriving at the climax, Galt suddenly launches into a hundred pages of speech, just when I'm waiting and eager to read the resolution.

Beyond that, I rather dismissed her anti-religious remarks. I liked her economics, but I think her societal ideas, particularly the concept of individual morality to be a bit on the ludicrous side.
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ilja, on Jan 11 2009, 06:25 PM, said:

Mr. Naron, on Jan 11 2009, 08:16 PM, said:

ilja, on Jan 11 2009, 05:43 PM, said:

melissaTX, on Jan 11 2009, 07:03 PM, said:

I read from cover to cover and dismissed those parts as they do not apply. All else stands as great, and the few comments of Gualt do not make it any less a great book. It simply is a debating point for those who believe other than the same. I do think that Rands reason for making Gualt such a cynic is that it bring those in who have been subjected to humanism, includes those who do not believe. It seems everyone arrives at the same point [those who agree the book is one of the best ever written] via different paths.

I wonder if perhaps I had read it instead of listening to the audiobook if it would have been easier for me to overlook those parts? :D

It probably would have. My dad read it years ago, and he said he skipped a lot of the speachmaking. I can't imagine my dad not even mentioning the anti-faith parts if he'd read them.

He's been trying to get me to read it, and I probably will some day. It's one of those things where so much other stuff comes up--even if it is crappy sci-fi like 1632. :D

Well do like I did and listen to the audiobook. Oh, I forget. You dont' have that much time in the car, do you?

As for skipping the speechmaking, that would be a big part of the book. :D

Only when it snows. Other than that, I only have about two hours a day in the car. In California, that's right around the corner.
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:D
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:D
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I never took "the speech" too seriously, because I never took the book as a whole too seriously. I treat Atlas Shrugged like I treat the scifi works of Robert Heinlein - It's entertaining, makes a few good points, and is certainly food for thought and further discussion... But it's NOT the be-all end-all.

Let's not lose sight of the fact that, for all the good point Ayn Rand makes in Atlas about the entrepeneurial spirit etc, at the end of the day it's still a work of FICTION written by someone who has never actually been there done that. To the best of my knowledge, Ms. Rand has never actually run any sort of entrepeneurial enterprise.

Whenever I have time to read, I'd much rather read about how REAL entrepeneurs get the job done. I would highly suggest:

- The Maverick and His Machine: Thomas Watson, Sr. and the Making of IBM

- The HP Way: How Bill Hewlett and I Built Our Company, by David Packard

- Up the Organization: How to Stop the Corporation from Stifling People and Strangling Profits , by Robert Townsend (Founding CEO of Avis)

In fact, this cultish devotion to Ayn Rand and Atlas is one of the chief reasons I left the (Big L) Libertarian movement. (that, plus the child-like fixation on legalizing drugs, but that's another topic). It always seemed like the ones who were the staunchest devotees of Rand were also the same one who, like Rand, had the least actual experience on the subject. Long on complaints and short on solutions. Or, as they say in Texas, All Hat and No Cattle.
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Adam Smithee, on Jan 11 2009, 11:11 PM, said:

I never took "the speech" too seriously, because I never took the book as a whole too seriously. I treat Atlas Shrugged like I treat the scifi works of Robert Heinlein - It's entertaining, makes a few good points, and is certainly food for thought and further discussion... But it's NOT the be-all end-all.

Let's not lose sight of the fact that, for all the good point Ayn Rand makes in Atlas about the entrepeneurial spirit etc, at the end of the day it's still a work of FICTION written by someone who has never actually been there done that. To the best of my knowledge, Ms. Rand has never actually run any sort of entrepeneurial enterprise.

Whenever I have time to read, I'd much rather read about how REAL entrepeneurs get the job done. I would highly suggest:

- The Maverick and His Machine: Thomas Watson, Sr. and the Making of IBM

- The HP Way: How Bill Hewlett and I Built Our Company, by David Packard

- Up the Organization: How to Stop the Corporation from Stifling People and Strangling Profits , by Robert Townsend (Founding CEO of Avis)

In fact, this cultish devotion to Ayn Rand and Atlas is one of the chief reasons I left the (Big L) Libertarian movement. (that, plus the child-like fixation on legalizing drugs, but that's another topic). It always seemed like the ones who were the staunchest devotees of Rand were also the same one who, like Rand, had the least actual experience on the subject. Long on complaints and short on solutions. Or, as they say in Texas, All Hat and No Cattle.

:D Thank you, Adam. Perhaps I've been listening too much to those like you described. Either that or I misinterpreted what people meant by their praise of this book.

Thanks for the suggestions. Are any of these easy reads for someone like myself who is easily distracted and doesn't have a formal education past a couple of years of college?
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leftcoast, right winger, on Jan 11 2009, 09:31 PM, said:

:D

You nut you! :D
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Like a burp, I'm just repeating. . .
but yeah, when I read I tend to zip over parts that annoy me.
I like books on tape (we listen to Harry Potter on vacations and I listen to the Old and New Testament--plus other works of Scriptures--while I do Pilates in the mornings) but I wouldn't like to be held captive during an anti-Christian rant.
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I read the book over twenty years ago and it is actually one of my favorite books. I do not even remember that part, but I tend to skip things that I do not agree with, so I probably started reading it, did not like what I was reading and skipped it. I am not into organized religion although I do believe in God but no book influenced me, it was life.
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I love Atlas shrugged, with the exception of the 20 some odd page John Galt rant. I like the story and the characters, Dagney, John, Francisco, Mudoon, Dangnar and the others. I knew of Ayns' philosophy before I got to Atlas. I started with the Fountainhead, also a great read and movie, and her other witings. I get my religion from the Bible so was not particularly concerned with that aspect of Ayn Rands philosophy and fiction. I chose to disagree with her on that and the Pope would back me up on that one I think. It didn't make me a libertarian but it did help cement the things that my father stood for in a special place in my mind and heart. I read this as a young college student in the very beginning of the Reagan era. We had much more productive conversations about politics afterword. Even then there were morons who incredibly voted for Carter.
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ilja, on Jan 11 2009, 09:44 PM, said:

Adam Smithee, on Jan 11 2009, 11:11 PM, said:

I never took "the speech" too seriously, because I never took the book as a whole too seriously. I treat Atlas Shrugged like I treat the scifi works of Robert Heinlein - It's entertaining, makes a few good points, and is certainly food for thought and further discussion... But it's NOT the be-all end-all.

Let's not lose sight of the fact that, for all the good point Ayn Rand makes in Atlas about the entrepeneurial spirit etc, at the end of the day it's still a work of FICTION written by someone who has never actually been there done that. To the best of my knowledge, Ms. Rand has never actually run any sort of entrepeneurial enterprise.

Whenever I have time to read, I'd much rather read about how REAL entrepeneurs get the job done. I would highly suggest:

- The Maverick and His Machine: Thomas Watson, Sr. and the Making of IBM

- The HP Way: How Bill Hewlett and I Built Our Company, by David Packard

- Up the Organization: How to Stop the Corporation from Stifling People and Strangling Profits , by Robert Townsend (Founding CEO of Avis)

In fact, this cultish devotion to Ayn Rand and Atlas is one of the chief reasons I left the (Big L) Libertarian movement. (that, plus the child-like fixation on legalizing drugs, but that's another topic). It always seemed like the ones who were the staunchest devotees of Rand were also the same one who, like Rand, had the least actual experience on the subject. Long on complaints and short on solutions. Or, as they say in Texas, All Hat and No Cattle.

:D Thank you, Adam. Perhaps I've been listening too much to those like you described. Either that or I misinterpreted what people meant by their praise of this book.

Thanks for the suggestions. Are any of these easy reads for someone like myself who is easily distracted and doesn't have a formal education past a couple of years of college?


I'm particularly partial to David Packard's story. He not only built HP from a $500 garage startup to a $100-Billion+ worldwide enterprise, but was also deputy Sec'y of Defense under Nixon and received the Presidential medal of Freedom from President Reagan in '88. That's about as close as you can get to a real-life example of what the fictitious John Galt should have been.

It has been a few years, but I don't remember it being a particularly difficult read.
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ilja's Corny Corner

A Doctor, A Lawyer, A Little Boy And A Priest
A doctor, a lawyer, a little boy and a priest were out for a Sunday afternoon flight on a small private plane. Suddenly, the plane developed engine trouble. In spite of the best efforts of the pilot, the plane started to go down. Finally, the pilot grabbed a parachute, yelled to the passengers that they had better jump, and then he bailed out.

Unfortunately, there were only three parachutes remaining. The doctor grabbed one and said "I'm a doctor, I save lives, so I must live," and jumped out.

The lawyer then said, "I'm a lawyer and lawyers are the smartest people in the world. I deserve to live." He also grabbed a parachute and jumped.

The priest looked at the little boy and said, "My son, I've lived a long and full life. You are young and have your whole life ahead of you. Take the last parachute and live in peace."

The little boy handed the parachute back to the priest and said, "Not to worry, Father. The 'smartest man in the world' just took off with my back pack."

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ilja's Favorite RightNation Quotes

View Postspt, on 03 May 2011 - 05:32 PM, said:

I think maybe we should all go for a drink and ask for the new drink....it is called the Bin Laden...2 shots and a splash of water :drinkers: :drinkers:
http://i147.photobuc.../lmaosmiley.gif

View PostBrian Fellow, on 15 December 2012 - 02:45 PM, said:

Sorry was busy reading a tweet from an adamant 'pro-choice' person about gun control and 'how many children have to die before we do something'?

http://i147.photobuc...%202/anj_up.gif A perfect example of both irony and hypocrisy.

Quote

John Mauldin relates the details of a conversation he had with John Boehner, the Speaker of the House of Representatives.

At the :50 Maudlin describes Boehner telling him that Obama has,
“…balls made out of marshmallows…”

View PostSonofThunder, on 26 February 2013 - 05:47 AM, said:

If that is true, why do we see Boehner continually backing down and rolling over while Obama stands firm and never compromises?

View PostGertie Keddle, on 26 February 2013 - 06:34 AM, said:

'Cause he's a Campfire Girl?
http://i147.photobuc...06/kneeslap.gif

NEVER FORGET!

Staff Sgt. Matt Maupin’s long road home ended Saturday in a blaze of yellow ribbons, the silent tribute of people who lined the roads, and the respect of thousands more who filed past his coffin at a public visitation . . . “If four people showed up, that’s OK with me,” said Keith Maupin, the soldier’s father, as he took a mid-afternoon break outside the Civic Center, where many came up to him to shake his hand or give him a hug . . . Matt Maupin became the face of the war in Iraq for thousands here and across the country in April 2004, when an Arab TV station aired a tape showing the Union Township soldier kneeling and surrounded by masked men carrying automatic rifles . . .Four years and millions of prayers later, a tip from an Iraqi citizen led U.S. soldiers to the farm area northwest of Baghdad where Matt Maupin’s remains were found on March 20 . . .Scoutmaster David Bacon said the boys of Troop 511 had been well aware of the story of Matt Maupin and wanted to pay their own tribute.“I’ve talked to them many times about Matt,” said Bacon, whose cousin, Lance Cpl. David Kreuter, was killed in Iraq in 2005. “They understand it was the sacrifice of young men like Matt that gives us the freedom to meet every Monday night. There are places in the world where Boy Scouting is not allowed.” http://i147.photobuc.../3yqo3h0.gifPFC Keith Matthew MaupinCaptured in IraqApril 9, 2004

We Owe Them So Much

http://i147.photobuc.../troopsspin.gifNever Mind the Cost by c.m.steppe ©2001 There's a young man far from home, Called in time of war; Sent to defend our freedom On some distant foreign shore. On some distant foreign shore. We pray You keep him safe, We pray You keep him strong, We pray You send him safely home ... For he's been away so long. For he's been away so long. There's a young woman far from home, Serving U.S.A. with pride. Her every step is strong and sure, Courage in every stride. Courage in every stride. We pray You keep her safe, We pray You keep her strong, We pray You send her safely home ... For she's been away too long. For she's been away too long. Bless those who wait their safe return. Bless those who mourn the lost. Bless those who serve this country well, Never mind the cost. Never mind the cost. God, Bless America!

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An Email From God?

I got this in an email today and though it doesn't say who wrote it, I don't doubt these things could have happened.'MEET ME IN THE STAIRWELL' You say you will never forget where you were when you heard the news On September 11, 2001. Neither will I. I was on the 110th floor in a smoke filled room with a man who called his wife to say 'Good-Bye.' I held his fingers steady as he dialed. I gave him the peace to say, 'Honey, I am not going to make it, but it is OK..I am ready to go.' I was with his wife when he called as she fed breakfast to their children. I held her up as she tried to understand his words and as she realized he wasn't coming home that night. I was in the stairwell of the 23rd floor when a woman cried out to Me for help. 'I have been knocking on the door of your heart for 50 years!' I said. 'Of course I will show you the way home - only believe in Me now.' I was at the base of the building with the Priest ministering to the injured and devastated souls. I took him home to tend to his Flock in Heaven. He heard my voice and answered. I was on all four of those planes, in every seat, with every prayer. I was with the crew as they were overtaken. I was in the very hearts of the believers there, comforting and assuring them that their faith has saved them. I was in Texas , Virginia , California , Michigan , Afghanistan ... I was standing next to you when you heard the terrible news. Did you sense Me? I want you to know that I saw every face. I knew every name - though not all know Me. Some met Me for the first time on the 86th floor. Some sought Me with their last breath. Some couldn't hear Me calling to them through the smoke and flames; 'Come to Me... this way... take my hand.' Some chose, for the final time, to ignore Me. But, I was there. I did not place you in the Tower that day. You may not know why, but I do. However, if you were there in that explosive moment in time, would you have reached for Me? Sept. 11, 2001, was not the end of the journey for you. But someday your journey will end. And I will be there for you as well. Seek Me now while I may be found. Then, at any moment, you know you are 'ready to go.' I will be in the stairwell of your final moments. God http://i147.photobuc...3/knowjesus.gif