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DC Is Putting Up The Homeless In Really Nice Apartments, And The Result Is Exactly What You Would Expect Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Liz 

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  Posted 17 April 2019 - 06:01 PM

DC Is Putting Up The Homeless In Really Nice Apartments, And The Result Is Exactly What You Would Expect

Washington Examiner
by Eddie Scarry
April 17, 2019 05:49 PM

Excerpt:

D.C. lawmakers, in all of their wisdom, determined that poor, homeless people should be entitled to better housing than most middle-income earners. It went as well as anyone could have predicted.

Yet here’s a Washington Post headline on the policy: “D.C. housed the homeless in upscale apartments. It hasn’t gone as planned.”

You don’t say.

The sudden inflow of poor D.C. residents into one pricey apartment complex has led to new complaints of “panhandling, marijuana smoke in the halls and feces discovered on a landing in the stairwell,” according to the Post’s story.

In 2017, commissioners of D.C.’s housing authority raised the value of home rental vouchers for lower-income residents “so families can get back into neighborhoods … where they were priced out.” Getting “back into neighborhoods” apparently includes really rich neighborhoods that they never could have afforded without the voucher.

The program is astonishing in its generosity — using taxpayer money, much of which comes from people who live in more modest apartments. For a studio-style apartment in the city, a voucher will cover up to $2,520 per month in rent. For a one bedroom, it covers up to $2,648.

*snip*

The Post story looks at the once-beautiful Sedgwick Gardens apartment building in upper Northwest Washington as a case study in the havoc that the voucher program is causing. Poor residents are found dead in their apartments from overdosing. Common areas are strewn with litter. Human waste is found in the halls — something the Post described as a “less serious” nuisance.

Homelessness is empirically driven by mental illness and addiction. A quarter of the nation's homeless suffer from serious mental illness, a quarter are drug abusers, and nearly 40 percent are dependent on alcohol.

Why would you take these people and give them free rein of an apartment building in an affluent neighborhood? Why wouldn’t you first evaluate their condition and determine a practical location for their housing? It may not be a studio apartment in a posh high rise but, hey, life isn’t fair, and nobody wants to smell your rotting corpse next door.

*snip*

Full Article
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#2 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 06:21 PM

That's why they can't have nice things. I am DERPTACUS!
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#3 User is online   Taggart Transcontinental 

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 06:33 PM

Feels so wonderful to me, since they are the idiots that push this nonsense onto the rest of us.
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#4 User is offline   Wag-a-Muffin (D) 

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 06:52 PM

This is why I like "Habitat for Humanity." (Even with Jimmy Carter's association.) The needy people who get homes help build theirs and others. If you put sweat equity into sometime you don't poop on the landing. You are more likely to keep it nice. AND the foreclosure rate is very slim.

When you just "gift" someone with something valuable, they have no dog in the hunt. (Is that the best metaphor?)

Read my signature:

This post has been edited by Wag-a-Muffin (D): 17 April 2019 - 06:52 PM

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#5 User is offline   oki 

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 08:10 PM

View PostWag-a-Muffin (D), on 17 April 2019 - 06:52 PM, said:

This is why I like "Habitat for Humanity." (Even with Jimmy Carter's association.) The needy people who get homes help build theirs and others. If you put sweat equity into sometime you don't poop on the landing. You are more likely to keep it nice. AND the foreclosure rate is very slim.

When you just "gift" someone with something valuable, they have no dog in the hunt. (Is that the best metaphor?)

Read my signature:


Exactly, a few where built here in Green Bay last fall. The homes are pretty modest and nothing fancy, but certainly it is a roof over a persons head and it is theirs. Neighbors where worried that crime would increase etc. Hasn't happened, it's like you said, when you got skin in the game not only do you tend to take care of it, you also tend to not cause any trouble either.

One issue I have heard of with Habitat For Humanity is that build quality is not always what it should be. Largely due to volunteers who have zero clue or experience, but, can't have everything and that's why you need at least someone on the crew or a chief who can ensure things are done right.

Oki
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#6 User is offline   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 10:16 PM

It's the same shidt that has happened to my own neighborhood here in Louisville.

The city has torn down several project housing buildings and had moved the tenants into my neighborhood renting out many condos and apartment buildings (with HUD money) turning them all into section 8 housing. My neighborhood is the most moved into neighborhood in the entire city for the last 30 years, mostly middle class working families who own these single family houses built from the 1930s to the late 1950s but also with condos and apartments added in during the 1970's that were once high end luxury but since then have really deteriorated and were bought out by professional slum lords who don't even live here in this state.

The democrap libtard/proggy intent was to "make these people better by relocating them into better neighborhoods" only made our crime rate skyrocket, car break ins daily, shoplifting, tagging buildings/property, drug use and drug dealing, armed robbery at our stores become weekly and daily occurrences when there weren't any before this crap began.
They didn't get better, they ruined what was once a nice neighborhood and many of us had to fortify our property with fences with locking gates, security cameras, motion sensors and start packing heat just to go to the stores.

When I retire in about 8 years, I intend to move out to the country.

This post has been edited by Rock N' Roll Right Winger: 17 April 2019 - 10:17 PM

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#7 User is offline   grimreefer 

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 10:55 PM

I hear there's plenty of room in North Dakota. I'm sure the rent would be more reasonable there.
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#8 User is online   Martin 

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 06:54 AM

View Postoki, on 17 April 2019 - 08:10 PM, said:

Exactly, a few where built here in Green Bay last fall. The homes are pretty modest and nothing fancy, but certainly it is a roof over a persons head and it is theirs. Neighbors where worried that crime would increase etc. Hasn't happened, it's like you said, when you got skin in the game not only do you tend to take care of it, you also tend to not cause any trouble either. One issue I have heard of with Habitat For Humanity is that build quality is not always what it should be. Largely due to volunteers who have zero clue or experience, but, can't have everything and that's why you need at least someone on the crew or a chief who can ensure things are done right.


That is fairly accurate. I am one of the casual volunteers for Habitat For Humanity and I have worked on two houses so far. The crew chief is an expert and the most complicated carpentry is done by a handful of skillful, experienced amateur carpenters. The wiring, plumbing and HVAC are built by licensed workers we hire to do them. Other jobs are less technical and critical, like painting, landscaping, installing trim, and hanging doors, so we leave those to the less experienced volunteers like me.

The houses I worked on were built in a poor neighborhood where the lots are cheap and most of the houses are old and rundown. The neighbors welcome the Habitat houses as improvements to their neighborhood.

The houses we build are comfortable and well built. They simply lack features which you would expect from a commercial house builder. The houses I worked on lacked garages, for instance. No carpeting, bare floors. On the other hand, they meet up-to-date building codes and they come with new appliances. The new homeowner I met on the last one was pregnant, but she was painting along with the volunteers.
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#9 User is offline   Italian Biker 

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 07:03 AM

View PostRock N, on 17 April 2019 - 10:16 PM, said:

It's the same shidt that has happened to my own neighborhood here in Louisville.

The city has torn down several project housing buildings and had moved the tenants into my neighborhood renting out many condos and apartment buildings (with HUD money) turning them all into section 8 housing. My neighborhood is the most moved into neighborhood in the entire city for the last 30 years, mostly middle class working families who own these single family houses built from the 1930s to the late 1950s but also with condos and apartments added in during the 1970's that were once high end luxury but since then have really deteriorated and were bought out by professional slum lords who don't even live here in this state.

The democrap libtard/proggy intent was to "make these people better by relocating them into better neighborhoods" only made our crime rate skyrocket, car break ins daily, shoplifting, tagging buildings/property, drug use and drug dealing, armed robbery at our stores become weekly and daily occurrences when there weren't any before this crap began.
They didn't get better, they ruined what was once a nice neighborhood and many of us had to fortify our property with fences with locking gates, security cameras, motion sensors and start packing heat just to go to the stores.

When I retire in about 8 years, I intend to move out to the country.

And if someone attempts to improve the area, they'll label it gentrification.
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#10 User is offline   RedSoloCup 

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 07:04 AM

In the words of Forrest Gump:

"It happens."
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#11 User is offline   Natural Selection 

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 10:50 AM

Want to raise your standard of living in a liberal utopia? Stop working, put your stuff in storage, let your lease expire, and tell them you're homeless.

:nuts:
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#12 User is offline   oki 

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 01:57 PM

View PostMartin, on 18 April 2019 - 06:54 AM, said:

That is fairly accurate. I am one of the casual volunteers for Habitat For Humanity and I have worked on two houses so far. The crew chief is an expert and the most complicated carpentry is done by a handful of skillful, experienced amateur carpenters. The wiring, plumbing and HVAC are built by licensed workers we hire to do them. Other jobs are less technical and critical, like painting, landscaping, installing trim, and hanging doors, so we leave those to the less experienced volunteers like me.

The houses I worked on were built in a poor neighborhood where the lots are cheap and most of the houses are old and rundown. The neighbors welcome the Habitat houses as improvements to their neighborhood.

The houses we build are comfortable and well built. They simply lack features which you would expect from a commercial house builder. The houses I worked on lacked garages, for instance. No carpeting, bare floors. On the other hand, they meet up-to-date building codes and they come with new appliances. The new homeowner I met on the last one was pregnant, but she was painting along with the volunteers.


Tell ya' what, to someone who either sleeping under the stars, in a car or shelter it's a luxury palace.
It's a chance for someone to rebuild their life and start pulling themselves up. As I am handy with various things I might actually volunteer. Not a builder by trade, but I have done some small electrical, plumbing and construction jobs. Enough that I know the basic codes at least. As the old quote goes: Name me one failure that was a result of being over engineered or built? And, name me one time that an 'adequate' building or construction went on to become a marvel.


Either way, this is absolutely asinine and will succeed only in causing people to move from those neighborhoods and those neighborhoods to eventually turn to crap. Guess that's one way to lower housing costs.

Oki
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