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#21 User is offline   Magic Rat 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 04:34 PM

View PostLadybird, on 06 July 2019 - 04:22 PM, said:

Or network censors or his audience. We'll never know, right?
Didn't work out so well for the Smothers Brothers.

It obviously aired, so the "network censors" didn't edit it and I believe his show lasted eleven more years after it aired, so his audience didn't burn down the studio either. Perhaps it's this conceit I mentioned before that is so thick with baby boomers and later generations... We ARE the most important generation to breathe air and anyone before us were naïve morons because they all lived the dark world of conformity...

The baby boomers were the worst about this narcissism until these millenials came along. Not really their fault. It's their parents who had/have them convinced they are so special.

For the record, the conformity of the 1940's and 1950's were nothing compared to the current era. See Political Correctness for any necessary reference.

What happed to the Smothers Brothers might have something to do with them being a pair of unfunny hacks who had one joke that went ENTIRELY too long.

This post has been edited by Magic Rat: 06 July 2019 - 04:42 PM

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#22 User is offline   Wag-a-Muffin (D) 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 05:36 PM

View PostMagic Rat, on 06 July 2019 - 04:34 PM, said:



For the record, the conformity of the 1940's and 1950's were nothing compared to the current era. See Political Correctness for any necessary reference.

Best "political correctness" bit I've ever heard is Stan Freeburg's "Elderly Man River." I don't know if this was the 50's or the 60's. But Stan Freeburg's humor is what I aspire to achieve.

Click here and either read the script, or listen to the actual radio broadcast (also available here.)

Well crap. You can't listen to it without signing up for "Apple Music." But you can still read the script.

cut and pasted from Wikipedia, which I don't trust, but this seems to be okay:
Another sketch from the CBS show, "Elderly Man River", anticipated the political correctness movement by decades. Butler plays "Mr. Tweedly", a representative of a fictional citizens' radio review board, who constantly interrupts Freberg with a loud buzzer as Freberg attempts to sing "Old Man River". Tweedly objects first to the word "old", "which some of our more elderly citizens find distasteful". As a result, the song's lyrics are progressively and painfully distorted as Freberg struggles to turn the classic song into a form that Tweedly will find acceptable "to the tiny tots" listening at home: "He don't, er, doesn't plant 'taters, er, potatoes… he doesn't plant cotton, er, cotting… and them-these-those that plants them are soon forgotting", a lyric of which Freberg is particularly proud. Even when the censor finds Freberg's machinations acceptable, the constant interruption ultimately brings the song to a grinding halt (just before Freberg would have had to edit the line "You gets a little drunk and you lands in jail"), saying, "Take your finger off the button, Mr. Tweedly—we know when we're licked", furnishing the moral and the punch line of the sketch at once. But all of these factors forced the cancellation of the show after a run of only 15 episodes.

This post has been edited by Wag-a-Muffin (D): 06 July 2019 - 05:47 PM

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#23 User is offline   mjperry51 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 07:27 PM

View PostLadybird, on 06 July 2019 - 04:03 PM, said:

He was a business man. Do you think he would knowingly allow a song with obvious drug references on his show and risk the wrath of the FCC?


The FCC allowed the song to be played on radio.

Go back to The Beatles Sgt. Pepper, 1967. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds -- LSD. . .

One Toke was well after that. . .
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#24 User is offline   mjperry51 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 07:29 PM

View PostWag-a-Muffin (D), on 06 July 2019 - 05:36 PM, said:

Best "political correctness" bit I've ever heard is Stan Freeburg's "Elderly Man River." I don't know if this was the 50's or the 60's. But Stan Freeburg's humor is what I aspire to achieve.

Click here and either read the script, or listen to the actual radio broadcast (also available here.)

Well crap. You can't listen to it without signing up for "Apple Music." But you can still read the script.

cut and pasted from Wikipedia, which I don't trust, but this seems to be okay:
Another sketch from the CBS show, "Elderly Man River", anticipated the political correctness movement by decades. Butler plays "Mr. Tweedly", a representative of a fictional citizens' radio review board, who constantly interrupts Freberg with a loud buzzer as Freberg attempts to sing "Old Man River". Tweedly objects first to the word "old", "which some of our more elderly citizens find distasteful". As a result, the song's lyrics are progressively and painfully distorted as Freberg struggles to turn the classic song into a form that Tweedly will find acceptable "to the tiny tots" listening at home: "He don't, er, doesn't plant 'taters, er, potatoesů he doesn't plant cotton, er, cottingů and them-these-those that plants them are soon forgotting", a lyric of which Freberg is particularly proud. Even when the censor finds Freberg's machinations acceptable, the constant interruption ultimately brings the song to a grinding halt (just before Freberg would have had to edit the line "You gets a little drunk and you lands in jail"), saying, "Take your finger off the button, Mr. TweedlyŚwe know when we're licked", furnishing the moral and the punch line of the sketch at once. But all of these factors forced the cancellation of the show after a run of only 15 episodes.


Freeburg was brilliant. . .

ETA: Check out this Freeburg Youtube -- cut 3 (starting at about 3:01) is classic.



This post has been edited by mjperry51: 06 July 2019 - 07:40 PM

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#25 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 08:29 PM

Hell, I still don't understand what the lyrics in "Blinded By The Light" mean!
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#26 User is offline   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 09:11 PM

View Postmjperry51, on 06 July 2019 - 07:27 PM, said:

The FCC allowed the song to be played on radio.

Go back to The Beatles Sgt. Pepper, 1967. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds -- LSD. . .

One Toke was well after that. . .


Don't forget how Jim Morrison and The Doors and how they crossed the line on live TV back then?
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#27 User is offline   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 09:13 PM

View PostSeverian, on 06 July 2019 - 08:29 PM, said:

Hell, I still don't understand what the lyrics in "Blinded By The Light" mean!

It was written by Bruce Springsteen.

Nobody can figure out any of his mumbling gibberish on any of his songs anyhow?
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#28 User is offline   Wag-a-Muffin (D) 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 09:25 PM



My favorite Stan Freeberg bit. "Elderly Man River."
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#29 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 10:30 PM

Sorry Magic, I strongly disagree about Lawrence Welk knowing perfectly well what "toke" meant, and allowing it on his program anyway. Maybe everybody else associated with the show knew, the writers and producers and directors and singers and dancers, and they were all giggling behind his back :giggle: because they pulled one over on him. But Welk himself was famous for his naïve prudishness.

-----------------------
-----------------------

I DO agree, however, that drug references were nothing new in music. For just one of countless examples, Minnie the Moocher by Cab Calloway, 1931:

She messed around with a bloke named Smokey
She loved him though he was cokey
He took her down to Chinatown
And he showed her how to kick the gong around

("Cokey" should be self-explanatory. And "kicking the gong" was a reference to smoking opium.)

Or how 'bout the 1920's:

Champagne don't drive me crazy
Cocaine don't make me lazy
Ain't nobody's business if I do

(Recorded by lots of artists. The one I like best is by Billie Holliday.)

So yeah, I repeat, you're absolutely correct about drug songs going back many decades.

;)

This post has been edited by MontyPython: 07 July 2019 - 08:54 PM

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#30 User is offline   Magic Rat 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 11:00 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 06 July 2019 - 10:30 PM, said:

Sorry Magic, I strongly disagree about Lawrence Welk knowing perfectly well what "toke" meant, and allowing it on his program anyway. Maybe everybody else associated with the show knew, the writers and producers and directors and singers and dancers, and they were all giggling behind his back :giggle: because they pulled one over on him. But Welk himself was famous for his na´ve prudishness.

-----------------------
-----------------------

I DO agree, however, that drug references were nothing new in music. For just one of countless examples, Minnie the Moocher by Cab Calloway, 1931:

She messed around with a bloke named Smokey
She loved him though was cokey
He took her down to Chinatown
And he showed her how to kick the gong around

("Cokey" should be self-explanatory. And "kicking the gong" was a reference to smoking opium.)

Or how 'bout the 1920's:

Champagne don't drive me crazy
Cocaine don't make me lazy
Ain't nobody's business if I do

(Recorded by lots of artists. The one I like best is by Billie Holliday.)

So yeah, I repeat, you're absolutely correct about drug songs going back many decades.

;)

You don't think that over the years, Wellk never met Calloway, Bullmoose Jackson or even Cole Porter? All of those guys performed "dirty" songs or songs that referenced drug use. I'm sure Welk wasn't some naive Pollyanna wandering around aimlessly for over 65 years in show business thinking Big 10 Inch was about a fishing rod and I don't buy he thought One Toke Over The Line was a love song.

No offense, but this is a perfect example of the self-absorption of the baby boomers. Welk knew what he was doing.

This post has been edited by Magic Rat: 06 July 2019 - 11:20 PM

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#31 User is offline   Hieronymous 

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 11:06 PM

View Postmjperry51, on 06 July 2019 - 07:27 PM, said:

The FCC allowed the song to be played on radio.

Go back to The Beatles Sgt. Pepper, 1967. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds -- LSD. . .

One Toke was well after that. . .

I don't know that Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds was inspired by LSD. I seem to remember reading that the song was inspired by a drawing that Julian Lennon did as a boy called "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds". The lyrics sure sound like an LSD thing though.

Then again, maybe it was just the hippy version of Big Rock Candy Mountain

This post has been edited by Hieronymous: 06 July 2019 - 11:08 PM

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#32 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 12:03 AM

View PostHieronymous, on 06 July 2019 - 11:06 PM, said:

I don't know that Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds was inspired by LSD. I seem to remember reading that the song was inspired by a drawing that Julian Lennon did as a boy called "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds". The lyrics sure sound like an LSD thing though.

Then again, maybe it was just the hippy version of Big Rock Candy Mountain


Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds was, as you recall correctly, inspired by a picture Julian Lennon drew in school. It never was intended to be a "drug" song.


View PostMagic Rat, on 06 July 2019 - 11:00 PM, said:

You don't think that over the years, Wellk never met Calloway, Bullmoose Jackson or even Cole Porter? All of those guys performed "dirty" songs or songs that referenced drug use. I'm sure Welk wasn't some naive Pollyanna wandering around aimlessly for over 65 years in show business thinking Big 10 Inch was about a fishing rod and I don't buy he thought One Toke Over The Line was a love song.

No offense, but this is a perfect example of the self-absorption of the baby boomers. Welk knew what he was doing.


Of course Welk met and knew people who performed songs that referenced sex & drugs. And of course he knew what many of those references meant. Maybe even most of them. But notice he never used any of those songs ("Big Ten Inch", "Minnie the Moocher", "Ain't Nobody's Business", countless others) on his show. That's my point and I stand firmly by it. My family watched Welk's show religiously during my entire life there, and he wouldn't allow such stuff on his show if he knew what it meant. My parents (roughly Welk's age) also had no idea what "toke" meant. As for the specific song "One Toke Over The Line" I think the most likely explanation would be that he heard the lyrics "Sweet Jesus" and "Sweet Mary" and never gave it any critical thought after that.

And sorry, but yes, I am offended by the "boomer" remarks. I can't know what I'm talking about because, as a boomer, I'm too "self absorbed"?

F that.

<_<
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#33 User is offline   Magic Rat 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 02:47 AM

View PostMontyPython, on 07 July 2019 - 12:03 AM, said:


Of course Welk met and knew people who performed songs that referenced sex & drugs. And of course he knew what many of those references meant. Maybe even most of them. But notice he never used any of those songs ("Big Ten Inch", "Minnie the Moocher", "Ain't Nobody's Business", countless others) on his show. That's my point and I stand firmly by it. My family watched Welk's show religiously during my entire life there, and he wouldn't allow such stuff on his show if he knew what it meant. My parents (roughly Welk's age) also had no idea what "toke" meant. As for the specific song "One Toke Over The Line" I think the most likely explanation would be that he heard the lyrics "Sweet Jesus" and "Sweet Mary" and never gave it any critical thought after that.


You may stand by that opinion and I will stand by mine. I will concede that perhaps many in his audience were not aware of the reference. After all, after living through the social changes of the Great Depression and fighting the Second World War, they would be a bunch of innocent clodhoppers who would have certainly gotten the vapors when they heard modern slang about taking a drag off of what their generation called "muggles". Except, smoking weed wasn't any more of a new invention then as it is now. Just more famously headline grabbing then.

The idea that Welk, who was roughly your age at the time, was walking around in a some kind of childlike befuddlement over modern slang is a bit hard to believe. This is a guy who followed music and as difficult as it is to believe, had hit music which was cutting edge in his time. We all remember him as the old Champagne Music guy with the weird accent, playing oldies for our blue haired relatives. He wasn't always and when he had his show, he was smart enough to include some obviously ill advised and silly big band/showtune takes on current hits.

Hell, Sinatra, who notoriously hated Rock-n-Roll even recorded Beatles songs. One which became a major hit.

As one who appreciates past influences and some modern culture, I believe you can consider this and understand it.

Like I have said enough times, Welk was in the business too long, long after most of his contemporaries, (I might add, also long after most top 40 stars from the Rock-n-Roll era at the time.) and had too good of instincts to allow lyrics he didn't understand to be performed on his show. He knew what he was doing.

Quote

And sorry, but yes, I am offended by the "boomer" remarks. I can't know what I'm talking about because, as a boomer, I'm too "self absorbed"?

F that.

<_<


I didn't say you didn't know what you are talking about. You know this. I said that it is an example of the baby boomer generation thinking they invented everything from sex to popular music to drug use to partying. The boomers weren't any more special than anyone else even though they were told and still are told they were. And none of those things were new then, they aren't new now. The difference is that Mike Wallace and Walter Cronkite were there to talk about it. Just like Facebook and Instagram are there to document it now.

As a student of history, I have the same amused reaction to the tuned in kids smoking weed in the Haight you see in 1960's documentaries as I do to the woke kids you see smoking weed in Denver in the news today. I want to say the same thing to both: "Hey kid! How much of a rebel do you think you'd feel like if you knew your uptight grandmother was doing the same thing you are doing 50 years ago?"

Since we agree on at least 90% of topics, this is relatively minor but I certainly didn't want to offend you.

This post has been edited by Magic Rat: 07 July 2019 - 03:01 AM

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#34 User is offline   gravelrash 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 01:27 PM

My take is that "one toke over the line" is a "WTF am I doing with my life?" moment.

One toke over the line, sweet Jesus
Sitting downtown in a railway station
One toke over the line


Pull the trigger. Take a chance. Get away or get it together. A crossroad song.
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#35 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 04:25 PM

View PostMagic Rat, on 07 July 2019 - 02:47 AM, said:

You may stand by that opinion and I will stand by mine. I will concede that perhaps many in his audience were not aware of the reference. After all, after living through the social changes of the Great Depression and fighting the Second World War, they would be a bunch of innocent clodhoppers who would have certainly gotten the vapors when they heard modern slang about taking a drag off of what their generation called "muggles". Except, smoking weed wasn't any more of a new invention then as it is now. Just more famously headline grabbing then.


See? It's those comments about entire generations being "a bunch of innocent clodhoppers who would have certainly gotten the vapors when they heard modern slang" when nothing I said even remotely implied any such thing. I was talking about one single person who was famously naïve and prudish about such things. By no stretch of the imagination have I suggested anybody else in his generation was so naïve or prudish. That comment was just plain unreasonable and uncalled-for.


View PostMagic Rat, on 07 July 2019 - 02:47 AM, said:

The idea that Welk, who was roughly your age at the time, was walking around in a some kind of childlike befuddlement over modern slang is a bit hard to believe. This is a guy who followed music and as difficult as it is to believe, had hit music which was cutting edge in his time. We all remember him as the old Champagne Music guy with the weird accent, playing oldies for our blue haired relatives. He wasn't always and when he had his show, he was smart enough to include some obviously ill advised and silly big band/showtune takes on current hits.


Thank you for proving my point perfectly, though I doubt that's what you meant to do. You see, just like him at my age, I DO "walk around in some kind of childlike befuddlement" when it comes to most modern slang. I've been a musician since I was 12, professional musician since 18, and during my professional heyday was cutting edge. I knew all the slang terms, sex terms, drug terms, etc, but nowadays I can rarely understand any "street slang" or whatever. I'm no longer "cool" (if they even use the term "cool" anymore. I wouldn't know.)


View PostMagic Rat, on 07 July 2019 - 02:47 AM, said:

Hell, Sinatra, who notoriously hated Rock-n-Roll even recorded Beatles songs. One which became a major hit.

As one who appreciates past influences and some modern culture, I believe you can consider this and understand it.


Sinatra? Then I think you must be referring to "Something", hardly a "rock" song. It was a love ballad.


View PostMagic Rat, on 07 July 2019 - 02:47 AM, said:

Like I have said enough times, Welk was in the business too long, long after most of his contemporaries, (I might add, also long after most top 40 stars from the Rock-n-Roll era at the time.) and had too good of instincts to allow lyrics he didn't understand to be performed on his show. He knew what he was doing.


But that's exactly what I meant earlier: I sincerely believe the most logical, most likely explanation is that he heard "Sweet Jesus" and "Sweet Mary" and didn't suppose it required further examination. I seriously doubt he even considered what "toke" might mean.


View PostMagic Rat, on 07 July 2019 - 02:47 AM, said:

I didn't say you didn't know what you are talking about. You know this.


No, I don't know it. Or at least didn't. It was extremely insulting.


View PostMagic Rat, on 07 July 2019 - 02:47 AM, said:

I said that it is an example of the baby boomer generation thinking they invented everything from sex to popular music to drug use to partying. The boomers weren't any more special than anyone else even though they were told and still are told they were. And none of those things were new then, they aren't new now. The difference is that Mike Wallace and Walter Cronkite were there to talk about it. Just like Facebook and Instagram are there to document it now.


There are indeed lots of clueless, self-absorbed boomers. But no moreso than any other generations. It just seems like a higher percentage because there are so many boomers. That's why that particular generation was called the "baby boom": Because there were so many OF them; A lot more than ever before. I don't agree that the percentage of clueless, self-absorbed boomers is larger than the percentage in any other generations.


View PostMagic Rat, on 07 July 2019 - 02:47 AM, said:

As a student of history, I have the same amused reaction to the tuned in kids smoking weed in the Haight you see in 1960's documentaries as I do to the woke kids you see smoking weed in Denver in the news today. I want to say the same thing to both: "Hey kid! How much of a rebel do you think you'd feel like if you knew your uptight grandmother was doing the same thing you are doing 50 years ago?"


Yes, I've already agreed that the use of drugs, and drug references in popular music, go way way way back, long before any of us boomers were born.


View PostMagic Rat, on 07 July 2019 - 02:47 AM, said:

Since we agree on at least 90% of topics, this is relatively minor but I certainly didn't want to offend you.


I appreciate the sentiment. But it was very offensive.

:coolshades:

This post has been edited by MontyPython: 07 July 2019 - 04:26 PM

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#36 User is offline   Magic Rat 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 05:06 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 07 July 2019 - 04:25 PM, said:

See? It's those comments about entire generations being "a bunch of innocent clodhoppers who would have certainly gotten the vapors when they heard modern slang" when nothing I said even remotely implied any such thing. I was talking about one single person who was famously na´ve and prudish about such things. By no stretch of the imagination have I suggested anybody else in his generation was so na´ve or prudish. That comment was just plain unreasonable and uncalled-for.


The description I made about his audience was mainly a continuation of what I was saying to LB about them. I know you, personally didn't imply it but it is a message board, after all.

Where do we get this idea that Welk was "famously na´ve"? You don't succeed in any business and especially show business by being "na´ve". That is my whole point. He might have been prudish. I don't know. There's no real evidence that he was other than he was a Catholic and stayed married to the same woman. While Catholics can be quite prudish when it comes to sex outside of marriage, the don't really have a strict penalties against alcohol or substance use like some Protestant sects do.


Quote

Thank you for proving my point perfectly, though I doubt that's what you meant to do. You see, just like him at my age, I DO "walk around in some kind of childlike befuddlement" when it comes to most modern slang. I've been a musician since I was 12, professional musician since 18, and during my professional heyday was cutting edge. I knew all the slang terms, sex terms, drug terms, etc, but nowadays I can rarely understand any "street slang" or whatever. I'm no longer "cool" (if they even use the term "cool" anymore. I wouldn't know.)


You don't give yourself enough credit. I don't think you are any kind of befuddled old innocent who is confused by everything. But let's see if I made "your point".

As a musician, would you allow an artist in a nationally televised television show that you produce, to perform a number that you didn't even know what the subject was about?

I don't believe you would. Like most intelligent people, you wouldn't put your name on a product until you did at least a little research.

Quote

Sinatra? Then I think you must be referring to "Something", hardly a "rock" song. It was a love ballad.


A love ballad written by a member of the most famous Rock-N-Roll band ever. Point is, these old geezers knew what sells.

Quote

But that's exactly what I meant earlier: I sincerely believe the most logical, most likely explanation is that he heard "Sweet Jesus" and "Sweet Mary" and didn't suppose it required further examination. I seriously doubt he even considered what "toke" might mean.


You don't think he or his son (Who was a producer.) or anyone else in his staff wouldn't have scratched a head and said to himself:

What is this "toke"? I don'ta find ita any kinda Bible verse?

And then educated himself? A guy who's name is on the production? Who was successfully producing TV since it started and radio before that?

I just don't buy that the tuned in youth movement stuck it to the MAN this way.

Quote

No, I don't know it. Or at least didn't. It was extremely insulting.


I didn't say it. That should be enough for you to know.

Quote

There are indeed lots of clueless, self-absorbed boomers. But no moreso than any other generations. It just seems like a higher percentage because there are so many boomers. That's why that particular generation was called the "baby boom": Because there were so many OF them; A lot more than ever before. I don't agree that the percentage of clueless, self-absorbed boomers is larger than the percentage in any other generations.


I know what the definition of the baby boom is. I also know that many members of this g-g-generation had been convinced that they were put on this Earth to save the world and a lot of them were convinced by putting silly drug references in sub-par, but catchy songs was a good way to do it. Some were convinced that making boring movies about a pair of losers on a motorcycle ride/drug deal would do it. That'll sure show those uptight conformists! In my opinion, they failed. But opinions vary.

I honestly don't think you believe that and I really shouldn't have implied you did. It was a generalization and I will happily separate you from it.

Quote

Yes, I've already agreed that the use of drugs, and drug references in popular music, go way way way back, long before any of us boomers were born.


Tell that to anyone over 60 with a bong in the attic who think it was a brand new gig. It goes way back enough that even an old Champagne Music performer might have heard about it in his 60 plus years of the business...

Quote

I appreciate the sentiment. But it was very offensive.

:coolshades:


I certainly never meant to offend you. As you know, you are one of my personal favorites at RN and one of the few I consider a friend. You have my sincere apologies.
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#37 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 05:22 PM

Hey I can pinpoint at least one piece of common ground in this exchange! Yup, "Easy Rider" was a pointless, boring, yawnfest. I realize as a Harley lover I'm supposed to consider "Easy Rider" great; a classic. But just the opposite, I consider it mostly just embarrassing. A couple good songs in the soundtrack, but everything else was a waste of time.

Oh, and edited to add: Yeah, the motorcycles themselves were great. I'd love to own either one. Now if only the movie could've featured the motorcycles without the two gasholes riding them, it would've been a much better movie.

:D

This post has been edited by MontyPython: 07 July 2019 - 05:29 PM

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#38 User is offline   Magic Rat 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 05:41 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 07 July 2019 - 05:22 PM, said:

Hey I can pinpoint at least one piece of common ground in this exchange! Yup, "Easy Rider" was a pointless, boring, yawnfest. I realize as a Harley lover I'm supposed to consider "Easy Rider" great; a classic. But just the opposite, I consider it mostly just embarrassing. A couple good songs in the soundtrack, but everything else was a waste of time.

Oh, and edited to add: Yeah, the motorcycles themselves were great. I'd love to own either one. Now if only the movie could've featured the motorcycles without the two gasholes riding them, it would've been a much better movie.

:D


At least we're not that far off. I've made it through that turkey twice (I always try it twice.) and although I have a high tolerance for lousy movies, both times were like passing kidney stones. But at least it had a happy ending.

Fonda said that although his looked great, it was a terribly uncomfortable ride. It looks it too. Give me my Sportster any day.

This post has been edited by Magic Rat: 07 July 2019 - 05:47 PM

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#39 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 06:11 PM

View PostMagic Rat, on 07 July 2019 - 05:41 PM, said:

At least we're not that far off. I've made it through that turkey twice (I always try it twice.) and although I have a high tolerance for lousy movies, both times were like passing kidney stones. But at least it had a happy ending.

Fonda said that although his looked great, it was a terribly uncomfortable ride. It looks it too. Give me my Sportster any day.


I'll tell ya what made Captain America (Fonda's bike) so uncomfortable to ride: Those ape-hanger handlebars. First thing I'd do if I owned that bike would be to replace the ape-hangers with stock handlebars. Or maybe even those 30's-era really wide bars. Like these:

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/gjZGp60q148/maxresdefault.jpg
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#40 User is offline   Magic Rat 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 06:20 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 07 July 2019 - 06:11 PM, said:

I'll tell ya what made Captain America (Fonda's bike) so uncomfortable to ride: Those ape-hanger handlebars. First thing I'd do if I owned that bike would be to replace the ape-hangers with stock handlebars. Or maybe even those 30's-era really wide bars. Like these:

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/gjZGp60q148/maxresdefault.jpg

I love old American bikes.

I've never ridden a bike with the ape hangers. I've never ridden any chopped bike either. The ape hangers look uncomfortable and the forward front wheel looks difficult to control in traffic.

I love the lines on the old Indians. The new ones look a too contrived for my tastes, but the old ones were gorgeous.
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