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#1 User is offline   grimreefer 

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 11:09 PM

Quote

Confirmed: Trump Impeachment Syndrome Is Definitely Real

Townhall
Zachary Petrizzo
Jan 07, 2019 8:00 PM

excerpt:

Impeachment has been on the agenda and minds of many radical Democrats more than ever before after gaining the majority in the House of Representatives this past week. But the Democratic Party's leadership has declared that it's too soon to discuss the topic of impeaching President Trump before the rest of the findings from the Mueller probe are presented to Congress.

As you might recall, the term "Trump Derangement Syndrome" has been used to characterize people who display "symptoms" of disapproval that Trump is president of The United States while they are also outraged by those who support him.

Even Donald Trump Jr. has helped in identifying and exposing those who have TDS, and extreme rage filled hatred such as the not-so-funny Kathy Griffin.

With the rise of impeachment calls from Members of Congress, I have found it ever-so-necessary that we add a new term to the collection, "Trump Impeachment Syndrome."

Here are some examples of Trump Derangement Syndrome featuring a GameStop triggering and CNN reporter Kaitlan Collins:

As I reported here at Townhall, this lady was triggered at a GameStop and turned to violence. This is a great example of "Trump Derangement Syndrome":

There are a few prime examples of Trump Derangement Syndrome. Remember the transgender woman at GameStop? Or the hilarious moment where CNN reporter Kaitlan Collins was triggered over President Trump not taking questions from the media in a press conference.

Later in the week, Collins decided to ask questions of President Trump that were quite rigged and weighted. Again...Trump Derangement Syndrome:

So what is "Trump Impeachment Syndrome," you might ask?



Those who have "Trump Impeachment Syndrome" include the following, among other Democrats:

Michigan freshman Rep. Rashida Tlaib who earned the spotlight last week with her profanity laced call to impeach President Donald Trump, while Reps. Brad Sherman and Maxine Waters have joined in with fellow member Tom Steyer to support impeachment proceedings.

The new Chairwoman of the House Financial Services Committee, Maxine Waters, is the worst when it comes to her calls that incite violence. Liberals are even calling out Waters! According to Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), a liberal watchdog group, she is one of the most corrupt politicians in D.C., while also having strong ties to radical anti-Semite Louis Farrakhan.

Waters has repeatedly used rhetoric to encourage the use of violence against the President and other administration officials.

Waters stated in a speech this past year, "...impeachment, impeachment, impeachment, impeachment, impeachment, impeachment.."


*SNIP*

LINK

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#2 User is offline   Martin 

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 04:34 PM

Over at the New Republic, Matt Ford is hallucinating Trump's impeachment:


Trumpís Impeachment Trial Is Already Underway
The debate is no longer about whether his removal is warranted. It's about the political and practical calculations.
By MATT FORD
January 8, 2019

Impeachment is supposed to be reserved for serious abuses of power, or when the office-holder threatens the integrity of American democracy. Thereís a strong case to be made for impeaching Trump on those grounds. The New York Timesí David Leonhardt laid out four specific reasons last week: for using the presidency to enrich himself and his businesses, for violating campaign-finance laws during the 2016 election, by obstructing justice during the Russia investigation, and by subverting the nationís democratic structures throughout his presidency.


Barring some major developments, itís hard to envision a scenario where Trump is removed from power by Congress. That doesnít mean heís free from accountability, of course. Lawmakers can still use their oversight powers to investigate the administration and uncover wrongdoing. I noted last month that the greater risk at the moment for Trump is that heíll be indicted after leaving office, perhaps on campaign-finance charges related to the hush-money payments he made in 2016. Heíll also face the ultimate reckoning from voters in 2020.

None of this means that the ongoing impeachment debate isnít worth having. According to a New York Times report in November, Trump tried to order the Justice Department to prosecute former presidential rival Hillary Clinton and former FBI Director James Comey last spring. Targeting political opponents for criminal prosecution on dubious grounds at best is a clear abuse of power and a hallmark of authoritarian rule. The Times reported that he backed down after Don McGahn, the White House counsel at the time, warned that it could lead to his impeachment. Sometimes a weapon is more effective when it isnít used.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
So, in the first place, Ford claims the grounds for impeachment of Trump are that he used the Presidency to enrich himself (what, did he rent out the Lincoln bedroom?), violated campaign finance laws in 2016 (evidence, please?), obstructed justice during the Russia investigation (how? He fired Comey, but Presidents fire people.), and "subverted the nation's democratic structures throughout his Presidency" (how?). The Mueller investigation is approaching two years of age now and still hasn't come up with anything clearly illegal.

In the second place, Ford says that Trump is in danger of prosecution once he leaves office and a paragraph later argues that "targeting political opponents for criminal prosecution on dubious grounds at best is a clear abuse of power and a hallmark of authoritarian rule." Right after he argues Trump's predecessor should prosecute Trump upon his leaving office, he argues how tyrannical that is.

The symptoms of Trump Derangement Syndrome appear to include hallucinations of impeachments beginning when they actually haven't, imagining criminal culpability where there isn't any, and the compulsion to contradict oneself.
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#3 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:04 PM

View PostMartin, on 09 January 2019 - 04:34 PM, said:

Over at the New Republic, Matt Ford is hallucinating Trump's impeachment:


Trumpís Impeachment Trial Is Already Underway
The debate is no longer about whether his removal is warranted. It's about the political and practical calculations.
By MATT FORD
January 8, 2019

Impeachment is supposed to be reserved for serious abuses of power, or when the office-holder threatens the integrity of American democracy. Thereís a strong case to be made for impeaching Trump on those grounds. The New York Timesí David Leonhardt laid out four specific reasons last week: for using the presidency to enrich himself and his businesses, for violating campaign-finance laws during the 2016 election, by obstructing justice during the Russia investigation, and by subverting the nationís democratic structures throughout his presidency.


Barring some major developments, itís hard to envision a scenario where Trump is removed from power by Congress. That doesnít mean heís free from accountability, of course. Lawmakers can still use their oversight powers to investigate the administration and uncover wrongdoing. I noted last month that the greater risk at the moment for Trump is that heíll be indicted after leaving office, perhaps on campaign-finance charges related to the hush-money payments he made in 2016. Heíll also face the ultimate reckoning from voters in 2020.

None of this means that the ongoing impeachment debate isnít worth having. According to a New York Times report in November, Trump tried to order the Justice Department to prosecute former presidential rival Hillary Clinton and former FBI Director James Comey last spring. Targeting political opponents for criminal prosecution on dubious grounds at best is a clear abuse of power and a hallmark of authoritarian rule. The Times reported that he backed down after Don McGahn, the White House counsel at the time, warned that it could lead to his impeachment. Sometimes a weapon is more effective when it isnít used.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
So, in the first place, Ford claims the grounds for impeachment of Trump are that he used the Presidency to enrich himself (what, did he rent out the Lincoln bedroom?), violated campaign finance laws in 2016 (evidence, please?), obstructed justice during the Russia investigation (how? He fired Comey, but Presidents fire people.), and "subverted the nation's democratic structures throughout his Presidency" (how?). The Mueller investigation is approaching two years of age now and still hasn't come up with anything clearly illegal.

In the second place, Ford says that Trump is in danger of prosecution once he leaves office and a paragraph later argues that "targeting political opponents for criminal prosecution on dubious grounds at best is a clear abuse of power and a hallmark of authoritarian rule." Right after he argues Trump's predecessor should prosecute Trump upon his leaving office, he argues how tyrannical that is.

The symptoms of Trump Derangement Syndrome appear to include hallucinations of impeachments beginning when they actually haven't, imagining criminal culpability where there isn't any, and the compulsion to contradict oneself.


LOLOLOLOL

There's so much bullsh*t in Matt Ford's screed it's hard to choose which clump to ridicule, LOL. I guess I'll go with the "dubious grounds at best" comment (referring to Hillary's and Comey's long-proven crimes.) Funny how they still cling so desperately to the "collusion" myth against Trump with exactly zero evidence to support it, but the indisputably proven facts about Hillary's & Comey's crimes are referred to as "dubious grounds at best".

Leftists have gone far beyond mere "stupid" territory and far into the realm of outright insanity.

:nuts:
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#4 User is online   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 07:20 PM

For what?

No crime has been committed, no laws have been broken.

Not a damned one.

These people are just sore <censored>ing losers throwing a temper tantrum because they cannot get their way because not many out there want them either. So all they are doing is trying to <censored> up everything to stymie Trump to stop him from undoing all of their commie proggy agendas.

They are failing and will fail completely because they do not have any truth or facts on their side at all.

These people need to be removed from every institution and positions of authority in the world and the sooner the better.


They are a disease.
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#5 User is online   zurg 

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 07:43 PM

View PostRock N, on 09 January 2019 - 07:20 PM, said:

These people are just sore <censored>ing losers

Nailed it
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