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William Tully Brown, One Of The Last Navajo Code Talkers, Dies At 96 Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Liz 

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  Posted 06 June 2019 - 02:13 AM

William Tully Brown, One Of The Last Navajo Code Talkers, Dies At 96

Washington Examinmer
by Jonas Wells
Updated Jun 05, 2019, 11:09 PM

Excerpt:

William Tully Brown, one of the last remaining Navajo code talkers, died Monday at 96.

Brown was one of the roughly 400 Navajos who served the U.S. Marines and Navy by using their native language to develop a code for top-secret messages during World War II.

Navajo Code Talker William Tully Brown passed away yesterday at 96 years old.

Brown, one of the last surviving Code Talkers from WWII, enlisted in 1944 and became part of a legendary group of Native Americans who encoded messages in the Navajo language.

Quote

Semper Fidelis, Marine. pic.twitter.com/yKuYHa4DsB

— U.S. Marines (@USMC) June 4, 2019

"From 1942 until 1945, Navajo code was used by the US Marines and Navy, and they tell us that we saved hundreds of thousands of lives and helped win the war in the Pacific to preserve our freedom and liberty," said Peter McDonald, president of the Navajo Code Talkers Association, according to CNN.

Brown was born in Black Mountain, Arizona, on Oct. 30, 1922. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1944 and served until he was honorably discharged in 1946. No cause of death was immediately available.

“The Navajo Nation has lost another great Diné warrior,” Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said in a statement.

*snip*

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#2 User is offline   DJGoody 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 12:18 PM

:salute:
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#3 User is offline   Hieronymous 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 09:51 PM

I remember the movie Windtalkers and being really disappointed when I saw it. I figured it would be about a part of military history that isn't so widely known. Instead it was a Hollywood action movie that barely focused on the code talkers.

RIP to a true hero.
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#4 User is offline   oki 

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 02:22 PM

View PostHieronymous, on 06 June 2019 - 09:51 PM, said:

I remember the movie Windtalkers and being really disappointed when I saw it. I figured it would be about a part of military history that isn't so widely known. Instead it was a Hollywood action movie that barely focused on the code talkers.

RIP to a true hero.



One crazy irony is that many if not most of the Native/Indian languages are pronounced exactly or very close to Japanese.
When I was stationed in Okinawa one of my fellow soldiers was an Indian from South Dakota. Not only did she notice this but I have seen it since coming to Wisconsin with my wife. Something else people often miss is that many who went of to fight, Indians, Germans, Italians, ethnic Japanese were not exactly welcomed with opened arms. They went through a lot first at the hands of their trainers and fellow soldiers just to prove themselves. THEN they went to war where many went above and beyond. The Navajo as well as Apache code talkers, the 442nd, just to name a few. Men like this truly blazed the path and made a hell of an impact.

Oki
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