RightNation.US
News (Home) | Righters' Blog | Hollywood Halfwits | Our Store | New User Intro | Link to us | Support Us

RightNation.US: Wind Turbine Blades Canít Be Recycled - RightNation.US

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Wind Turbine Blades Canít Be Recycled So Theyíre Piling Up in Landfills Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

  • <no title>
  • View gallery
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 37,713
  • Joined: 13-January 04

Posted 08 February 2020 - 09:01 AM

Wind Turbine Blades Can't Be Recycled, So They're Piling Up in Landfills
February 5, 2020, 4:00 AM CST Updated on February 7, 2020, 10:54 AM CST
By Chris Martin
Bloomberg

<More lefty Unintended Consequences Because They're Too Stupid To See Past First Order Effects Here>

A wind turbine's blades can be longer than a Boeing 747 wing, so at the end of their lifespan they can't just be hauled away. First, you need to saw through the lissome fiberglass using a diamond-encrusted industrial saw to create three pieces small enough to be strapped to a tractor-trailer.

The municipal landfill in Casper, Wyoming, is the final resting place of 870 blades whose days making renewable energy have come to end. The severed fragments look like bleached whale bones nestled against one another.

"That's the end of it for this winter," said waste technician Michael Bratvold, watching a bulldozer bury them forever in sand. "We'll get the rest when the weather breaks this spring."

Tens of thousands of aging blades are coming down from steel towers around the world and most have nowhere to go but landfills. In the U.S. alone, about 8,000 will be removed in each of the next four years. Europe, which has been dealing with the problem longer, has about 3,800 coming down annually through at least 2022, according to BloombergNEF. It's going to get worse: Most were built more than a decade ago, when installations were less than a fifth of what they are now.

Built to withstand hurricane-force winds, the blades can't easily be crushed, recycled or repurposed. That's created an urgent search for alternatives in places that lack wide-open prairies. In the U.S., they go to the handful of landfills that accept them, in Lake Mills, Iowa; Sioux Falls, South Dakota; and Casper, where they will be interred in stacks that reach 30 feet under.

"The wind turbine blade will be there, ultimately, forever," said Bob Cappadona, chief operating officer for the North American unit of Paris-based Veolia Environnement SA, which is searching for better ways to deal with the massive waste. "Most landfills are considered a dry tomb."

"The last thing we want to do is create even more environmental challenges."

To prevent catastrophic climate change caused by burning fossil fuels, many governments and corporations have pledged to use only clean energy by 2050. Wind energy is one of the cheapest ways to reach that goal.

The electricity comes from turbines that spin generators. Modern models emerged after the 1973 Arab oil embargo, when shortages compelled western governments to find alternatives to fossil fuels. The first wind farm in the U.S. was installed in New Hampshire in 1980, and California deployed thousands of turbines east of San Francisco across the Altamont Pass.

The first models were expensive and inefficient, spinning fast and low. After 1992, when Congress passed a tax credit, manufacturers invested in taller and more powerful designs. Their steel tubes rose 260 feet and sported swooping fiberglass blades. A decade later, General Electric Co. made its 1.5 megawatt modelóenough to supply 1,200 homes in a stiff breezeóan industry standard.

Wind power is carbon-free and about 85% of turbine components, including steel, copper wire, electronics and gearing can be recycled or reused. But the fiberglass blades remain difficult to dispose of. With some as long as a football field, big rigs can only carry one at a time, making transportation costs prohibitive for long-distance hauls. Scientists are trying to find better ways to separate resins from fibers or to give small chunks new life as pellets or boards.

(snip)

<More lefty Unintended Consequences Because They're Too Stupid To See Past First Order Effects Here>
0

#2 User is online   Taggart Transcontinental 

  • <no title>
  • View gallery
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 28,955
  • Joined: 22-October 03

Posted 08 February 2020 - 09:27 AM

When you create a military project thanks to the leftists you have to create the program including all the life cycle costs. This includes the destruction / disposal of all the products at the end of their useful life. That is one reason our programs are so damn expensive. Honestly this is a good thing. Apparently they didn't do the same as far as requirements for green programs. They need to, then you would see the real real costs of their ideas. Here's a hint. They aren't cheap.
0

#3 User is online   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

  • Pissing off all of the right people
  • Group: Silver
  • Posts: 33,643
  • Joined: 14-October 03

Posted 08 February 2020 - 09:31 AM

Fiberglass resin will burn when heated enough.

They could use these for a boiler fuel supplement in some coal fired power plants.

The prop style horizontal wind turbines are very wasteful and have a very short life span. Much of this is on purpose so that the makers will always be getting more and more of people's money to build more planned obsolescence junk to keep everyone permanently on the hook to buy more.

They don't want them to last. This is the corporate American way for everything now, folks. Most everything that is made anymore is intended to break one off in the consumer's ass, make their pants burn and keep them all on the hook forever to keep on buying more of their junk to keep that money forever coming from your wallet and into their hands. They can make things that would last forever, but there's no profit in that and these people have no honesty, morals, or regards for anyone. Profit and greed are their Gods. There are no more regulations to limit them or force them to be honest because they've bought off the government and had the rules all re-written to favor them over the lowly serfs/peons/peasants. (I see this crap happening here in my everyday job and it's REALLY disgusting me as you can see!)

The vertical axis style are much better and are located closer to the ground and they're all designed to be easily serviceable, unlike the prop style ones that Americans use. They use less moving parts and do not need rotate to point into the wind as they are omni-directional and easily handle high wind speeds and do not self destruct, unlike the prop style.

The gearbox and generators are at ground level. The Swiss have been using these types much longer than anyone else in the world.

https://www.windpowe...-wind-turbines/

This post has been edited by Rock N' Roll Right Winger: 08 February 2020 - 10:05 AM

0

#4 User is online   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

  • Pissing off all of the right people
  • Group: Silver
  • Posts: 33,643
  • Joined: 14-October 03

Posted 08 February 2020 - 09:35 AM

View PostTaggart Transcontinental, on 08 February 2020 - 09:27 AM, said:

When you create a military project thanks to the leftists you have to create the program including all the life cycle costs. This includes the destruction / disposal of all the products at the end of their useful life. That is one reason our programs are so damn expensive. Honestly this is a good thing. Apparently they didn't do the same as far as requirements for green programs. They need to, then you would see the real real costs of their ideas. Here's a hint. They aren't cheap.

Factor in that it's all based upon getting kickbacks paid out to the big business owners, government elected officials and their families.

Most everything in this country anymore involves someone being on the take.

This is the downside of unregulated uncontrolled corrupt capitalism.

This is why Trump is receiving SO MUCH resistance from the deep staters of both parties and especially the corrupt demoncraps. Trump is trying to get this crap under control and stopped and they are pulling out every stop to prevent him from succeeding.

This post has been edited by Rock N' Roll Right Winger: 08 February 2020 - 10:08 AM

0

#5 User is offline   MontyPython 

  • Pull My Finger.....
  • View gallery
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 60,952
  • Joined: 28-February 03

Posted 08 February 2020 - 10:11 AM

I have a question: If they're too big to haul away, how did they get them there in the first place?

:scratch:
0

#6 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

  • School of the Cold Hard Facts
  • View gallery
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 22,591
  • Joined: 11-December 04

Posted 08 February 2020 - 10:31 AM

Meh. Just because something wasn't done yesterday doesn't mean it won't be done tomorrow.

The boating industry has been looking at this for a LONG time. And, y'know what?

New system created for recycling composite boats
By Ben Coxworth
June 09, 2011


Full story on NewAtlas.com

We've all heard about old metal car bodies being melted down for recycling, but what happens to the composite hulls and superstructures of past-their-prime recreational boats? Well, not much. Generally, they just end being sunk, burned, or put in a scrapyard. Sometimes, the composites are ground up and added as filler to virgin material. An alternative may be on the way, however, as researchers have discovered a new method for separating the composite components for future reuse...

Three years ago, Norwegian recycling company Veolia joined forces with SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, the Norwegian Composite Association, the Reichhold composite company, and Nordboat, in a project aimed at finding a way around that challenge. The project would also evaluate the feasibility of collecting, dismantling, and transporting cast-off recreational boats, in order that they could be recycled.

SINTEF has since devised an unspecified chemical process, which is reportedly quite effective at separating cross-linked polyester and fiberglass for reuse. "The level of usability varies from property to property, but is around 80 per cent," said SINTEF research director Fabrice Lapique. "And best of all is that the process is easy to implement in an industrial context. Within two hours, more than 80 per cent of the material has been dissolved and the temperature during the process does not exceed 220 degrees [428F]." ...

-------------------------

This is a real issue to the boating industry. Sales of new recreational boats have been slack for quite some time because there's such a glut of old used fiberglass boats on the market that can be had for next to nothing; they're so expensive to dispose of that the incentive is to buy a used boat dirt-cheap or even "free" and overhaul it rather than buy a new boat. Figuring this out will be a major boon for the boat manufacturers.

Free-boat.com: A listing of free or nearly free boats and marine equipment.
0

#7 User is online   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

  • Pissing off all of the right people
  • Group: Silver
  • Posts: 33,643
  • Joined: 14-October 03

Posted 08 February 2020 - 10:43 AM

View PostMontyPython, on 08 February 2020 - 10:11 AM, said:

I have a question: If they're too big to haul away, how did they get them there in the first place?

:scratch:

:exactly:

We have a company here that manufactures many fiberglass items such as the huge cargo covers for coal barges and also these giant wind turbine blades.

I've seen dozens of these wind turbine blades being hauled on the interstate highways through the city here and they are being hauled with a specialized trailer made just for this purpose.


0

#8 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

  • School of the Cold Hard Facts
  • View gallery
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 22,591
  • Joined: 11-December 04

Posted 08 February 2020 - 10:45 AM

View PostMontyPython, on 08 February 2020 - 10:11 AM, said:

I have a question: If they're too big to haul away, how did they get them there in the first place?

:scratch:



Why haul them away? In eastern oregon the windfarms are on miles and miles and miles of otherwise unusable scrubland. Why not just stack them right there on site and let them sit UNTIL there are enough that it's feasible to build a recycling facility right there on site?

https://portlandgreenenergy.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/windturbinesheader.jpg
0

#9 User is online   Noclevermoniker 

  • Wire Dachsies Matter
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 17,995
  • Joined: 13-November 03

Posted 08 February 2020 - 11:18 AM

Nothing. Is. Free.
0

#10 User is offline   Wag-a-Muffin (D) 

  • Still clinging bitterly. . .
  • View blog
  • Group: Blog Moderator
  • Posts: 20,212
  • Joined: 03-November 04

Posted 08 February 2020 - 11:23 AM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 08 February 2020 - 10:45 AM, said:

Why haul them away? In eastern oregon the windfarms are on miles and miles and miles of otherwise unusable scrubland. Why not just stack them right there on site and let them sit UNTIL there are enough that it's feasible to build a recycling facility right there on site?

https://portlandgreenenergy.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/windturbinesheader.jpg

You're making too much sense again!
0

#11 User is offline   stick 

  • The 'Little Genius' giving thanks
  • View blog
  • View gallery
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 16,893
  • Joined: 24-November 03

Posted 08 February 2020 - 11:24 AM

View PostMontyPython, on 08 February 2020 - 10:11 AM, said:

I have a question: If they're too big to haul away, how did they get them there in the first place?

:scratch:


Iím guessing that the roads to the landfill arenít as accommodating as the roads from the blade factories to the installation sites. They are long loads permitted to go specific routes, but the landfills are few so I can see the need to section them to get them to the fill and also to position them a lot easier at the site..
0

#12 User is offline   Oathtaker 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Silver
  • Posts: 1,132
  • Joined: 21-August 03

Posted 08 February 2020 - 11:59 AM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 08 February 2020 - 10:31 AM, said:

Meh. Just because something wasn't done yesterday doesn't mean it won't be done tomorrow.

The boating industry has been looking at this for a LONG time. And, y'know what?

New system created for recycling composite boats
By Ben Coxworth
June 09, 2011


Full story on NewAtlas.com

We've all heard about old metal car bodies being melted down for recycling, but what happens to the composite hulls and superstructures of past-their-prime recreational boats? Well, not much. Generally, they just end being sunk, burned, or put in a scrapyard. Sometimes, the composites are ground up and added as filler to virgin material. An alternative may be on the way, however, as researchers have discovered a new method for separating the composite components for future reuse...

Three years ago, Norwegian recycling company Veolia joined forces with SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, the Norwegian Composite Association, the Reichhold composite company, and Nordboat, in a project aimed at finding a way around that challenge. The project would also evaluate the feasibility of collecting, dismantling, and transporting cast-off recreational boats, in order that they could be recycled.

SINTEF has since devised an unspecified chemical process, which is reportedly quite effective at separating cross-linked polyester and fiberglass for reuse. "The level of usability varies from property to property, but is around 80 per cent," said SINTEF research director Fabrice Lapique. "And best of all is that the process is easy to implement in an industrial context. Within two hours, more than 80 per cent of the material has been dissolved and the temperature during the process does not exceed 220 degrees [428F]." ...

-------------------------

This is a real issue to the boating industry. Sales of new recreational boats have been slack for quite some time because there's such a glut of old used fiberglass boats on the market that can be had for next to nothing; they're so expensive to dispose of that the incentive is to buy a used boat dirt-cheap or even "free" and overhaul it rather than buy a new boat. Figuring this out will be a major boon for the boat manufacturers.

Free-boat.com: A listing of free or nearly free boats and marine equipment.


I wonder how cost effective this process will be?

The other concern would be the chemicals used to break down the catalyzed resin. That must be some powerfully dangerous stuff.
0

#13 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

  • School of the Cold Hard Facts
  • View gallery
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 22,591
  • Joined: 11-December 04

Posted 08 February 2020 - 01:20 PM

View PostOathtaker, on 08 February 2020 - 11:59 AM, said:

I wonder how cost effective this process will be?

The other concern would be the chemicals used to break down the catalyzed resin. That must be some powerfully dangerous stuff.


Good question. I don't have an exact answer.

ALL new technologies are expensive at start. A lot depends on how 'scalable' it is and what the 'marginal' costs are. And by marginal cost, I mean the raw cost of building a second recycling machine after you're front-loaded all of your R&D time and expense and re-work into the (very expensive) prototype machine. And there's always "growing pains" as ANY new technology ramps up.

I would compare to "plastics". For a long time, there were certain plastics that were considered "non-recyclable". In particular, ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) and Polycarbonate aka "Lexan" aka "Plexiglass". They both went from "non-recyclable" to "Yeah, we can do it, but not economically viable" to "YES, we can do it profitably", all within the past 15-20 years.

Or consider the lowly plastic shopping bag. Just 10 years ago, they were considered a "nuisance" and non-recyclable to the point that some states/communities banned them. NOW, they're not only recyclable but PROFITABLY recyclable and I can make the case that those plastics bags - IF properly recycled - are actually MORE environmentally friendly than paper grocery bags. Want to talk about harsh/hazardous chemicals? Let's talk about what goes into making a typical paper grocery bag.

When it comes to Technology, what we know today isn't what we knew yesterday. Imagine what we'll know tomorrow.
0

#14 User is offline   zurg 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 30,630
  • Joined: 19-October 09

Posted 08 February 2020 - 08:03 PM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 08 February 2020 - 01:20 PM, said:

Good question. I don't have an exact answer.

ALL new technologies are expensive at start. A lot depends on how 'scalable' it is and what the 'marginal' costs are. And by marginal cost, I mean the raw cost of building a second recycling machine after you're front-loaded all of your R&D time and expense and re-work into the (very expensive) prototype machine. And there's always "growing pains" as ANY new technology ramps up.

I would compare to "plastics". For a long time, there were certain plastics that were considered "non-recyclable". In particular, ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) and Polycarbonate aka "Lexan" aka "Plexiglass". They both went from "non-recyclable" to "Yeah, we can do it, but not economically viable" to "YES, we can do it profitably", all within the past 15-20 years.

Or consider the lowly plastic shopping bag. Just 10 years ago, they were considered a "nuisance" and non-recyclable to the point that some states/communities banned them. NOW, they're not only recyclable but PROFITABLY recyclable and I can make the case that those plastics bags - IF properly recycled - are actually MORE environmentally friendly than paper grocery bags. Want to talk about harsh/hazardous chemicals? Let's talk about what goes into making a typical paper grocery bag.

When it comes to Technology, what we know today isn't what we knew yesterday. Imagine what we'll know tomorrow.

When it comes to technology, environment, recycling, for the WHOLE end to end lifetime (from raw materials to disposal), you know what analytical component is missing most importantly?

Honesty.

This post has been edited by zurg: 08 February 2020 - 08:04 PM

0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users