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12 Killed, Including Sheriff's Sergeant, in Thousand Oaks Bar Shooting Rate Topic: -----

#41 User is offline   SARGE 

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 03:52 PM

View Postoki, on 09 November 2018 - 02:11 PM, said:

Thanks for the info. Ironic in a way that know days at least most clubs and members try to keep a low profile and not draw attention. Bad for image, bad for business and un needed/wanted attention from the cops and general public. Gonna' have to guess that there where some rather interesting 'conversations' between the guys at the show and the higher ups after this.

Oki


Back when I was riding it was that way.

We flew our colors but had 'you leave me alone and we're fine, you push me and I will push back!' attitudes.
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#42 User is offline   Junto 

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 05:04 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 09 November 2018 - 02:35 PM, said:

That entire show was an out-of-control debacle. If you ever get the chance to see the whole movie "Gimme Shelter" you'll see what a disaster it was from beginning to end. In the rush to set up this free concert they didn't have an adequate stage, adequate facilities like bathrooms or washing areas, no food, no medical staff, no professional security, etc etc etc. Just a bunch of drunk Hells Angels beating everybody up including band members (Marty Balin of the Jefferson Airplane, for example, got knocked out right on stage.)

The area in front of the stage was like a war zone. The whole thing was a catastrophe waiting to happen, and happen it did. Meredith Hunter's death wasn't the only death, it was just the one that got all the attention because it was a murder. But three other people died there too; one drowned in an abandoned irrigation ditch, and two by hit-and-run accident. And that doesn't begin to cover all the injuries, beatings, cuts, broken bones, rapes, etc, plus robberies, stolen cars, and more.

"Disaster" just doesn't cover it.

B)


I watched that documentary about a year ago and just remembered the scene. Definitely worth a watch as you said.
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#43 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 05:22 PM

View PostJunto, on 09 November 2018 - 05:04 PM, said:

I watched that documentary about a year ago and just remembered the scene. Definitely worth a watch as you said.


Yup. Just as 1967 was called the "Summer of Love", and Woodstock in 1969 was supposedly all about "Peace and Love and Music", Altamont, only four months after Woodstock, pretty much ended the whole "Flower Power" nonsense of that decade. It proved that "young people" left to their own devices without any real supervision or authority figures or organization were every bit as out-of-control and prone to violence as anybody else.

"Poof" went the "Peace" generation.

B)
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#44 User is offline   Magic Rat 

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 06:14 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 09 November 2018 - 02:35 PM, said:

That entire show was an out-of-control debacle. If you ever get the chance to see the whole movie "Gimme Shelter" you'll see what a disaster it was from beginning to end. In the rush to set up this free concert they didn't have an adequate stage, adequate facilities like bathrooms or washing areas, no food, no medical staff, no professional security, etc etc etc. Just a bunch of drunk Hells Angels beating everybody up including band members (Marty Balin of the Jefferson Airplane, for example, got knocked out right on stage.)

The area in front of the stage was like a war zone. The whole thing was a catastrophe waiting to happen, and happen it did. Meredith Hunter's death wasn't the only death, it was just the one that got all the attention because it was a murder. But three other people died there too; one drowned in an abandoned irrigation ditch, and two by hit-and-run accident. And that doesn't begin to cover all the injuries, beatings, cuts, broken bones, rapes, etc, plus robberies, stolen cars, and more.

"Disaster" just doesn't cover it.

B)


So at least one good thing happened there too.
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#45 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 10:28 PM

View PostMagic Rat, on 09 November 2018 - 06:14 PM, said:

So at least one good thing happened there too.


:spank:
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#46 User is offline   donsaliman 

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 12:33 AM

Look, my heart cries out for those who were killed or injured and all of those who went through this nightmare. but saying that, I want to know how many of them, were anti-police.

This was in southern California, not far from Los Angeles and that is why I am asking this question.

This was a policeman who was killed, he is a human being and has a family, who has no father now and he gave up his life doing his job.

I also saw a few reports of police rescuing people from burning cars and risking their lives, and this goes on day after day and hour after hour, but most of what you hear about the police, is that they are racist and rotten, so that is why I asked.
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#47 User is offline   grimreefer 

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Posted 11 November 2018 - 11:30 AM

Quote

What we know about Thousand Oaks gunman Ian David Long, a Marine veteran

USA TODAY
Chris Woodyard and Marco della Cava
Published 10:02 a.m. ET Nov. 8, 2018
Updated 5:35 a.m. ET Nov. 9, 2018

excerpt:

NEWBURY PARK, Calif. – Sunny Southern California weather has a way of making all neighborhoods look idyllic.

But in one such Los Angeles-area home, a ranch-style house in a pleasant, leafy enclave, lurked a profound darkness. Inside 804 Fowler Ave. lived a troubled man whose rages created booming noises and summoned local police.

Marine Corps veteran Ian David Long, 28, the man accused of killing 12 at a nearby country bar late Wednesday before shooting himself, was a former machine gunner and decorated combat veteran of the war in Afghanistan who, authorities said, had an episode of erratic behavior last spring that suggested post-traumatic stress disorder.

Long's various interactions with police over the years pointed to a man who needed professional help. None came.

Neighbor Richard Berge said everyone on the block was aware when the police came to the Long home earlier this year after an incident.

“Police were here, and they finally get (Long) to come out of the house," Berge told USA TODAY Thursday as FBI agents shuttled in and out of the home Long shared with his mother, Colleen.

Berge described Long's mother as “a very nice lady" – he got to know her after offering to care for one of the family's combative German shepherds – who was frustrated her son wasn't seeking help for his condition.

Although Berge had never been inside the Long house, he said a neighbor had reported seeing walls that were "full of holes," adding that the neighbor got the impression that Long had kicked the walls in.

“She was worried because he wouldn’t get help,“ Berge said. “I asked her, ‘Can’t he just get help.’ She said, ‘He can’t get help.’"

Longtime neighborhood resident Donald MacLeod, 79, shares a back wall with the Long residence. He says he often heard the volatile adult son arguing with his mother at all hours, sometimes “in the middle of the night, at 2 a.m."

MacLeod noted that Long was loud and appeared to be threatening violence. More than a year ago, MacLeod heard a gunshot in the home but did not call police. He said he viewed Long as troubled and kept his distance, adding that he told his wife to treat the young man carefully avoid any prolonged discussions.

“No question in my mind that the guy was troubled,” he said, adding that Ian Long’s time in Afghanistan “made it worse.”

McLeod said Long’s role in the mass shooting fit his impressions. “I’m not surprised at all,” he said. “I did not trust the guy.”

Tim Tanner, who lives on the corner three houses away, said Long was someone who largely kept to himself.

“I’ve seen him a couple of times,” he said. Long was easily identifiable when he drove around the neighborhood in his bright red pickup truck, which was still in the cordoned off driveway Wednesday.

He was a “quiet, normal guy, kept to himself.”

That "normal" characterization stands in contrast to a depiction by a former roommate of Long's who described him as a "weird" loner who could be aggressively anti-social.

“He was kind of weird, he always locked himself in his room, he was always by himself,” Blake Winnett, 35, told the New York Post. “I didn’t really know him very well.”

He should have. Winnett and Long lived together on two occasions in 2012 and 2014, while Long was attending college in nearby Northridge. But Long apparently was purposefully standoffish.

“He didn’t want to help anyone do anything, he was just lazy, I guess,” Winnett recalled. When Long was once asked to take out the trash, he snarled, “That’s not my (expletive) job."

Winnett said he saw no evidence of violence from Long. Instead, he says his roommate often would disappear into the garage where he would practice dance moves for hours on end.

"He would close the garage and be playing music and dancing in there, like sweating," Winnett said. "I would open the garage and would be like, ‘What are you doing?'”

Run-ins with local police

Local authorities said they had periodic contact with Long over the years.

He was the victim of a battery at a local Thousand Oaks bar and also had been involved in two traffic accidents. Deputies were called to his home last year because of a domestic dispute, where he was "somewhat irate and acting irrationally," said Ventura County Sheriff Geoff Dean.

*SNIP*

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