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#1 User is offline   pepperonikkid 

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  Posted 25 August 2019 - 10:24 AM

Slavery In America Did Not Begin In 1619, And Other Things The New York Times Gets Wrong


https://thefederalist.com
By Lyman Stone
August 23, 2019


Article:

The New York Times has published a series of essays about slavery, race, and American politics under the heading "1619 Project." These essays cover an enormous amount of terrain: music, constitutional theory, economics, management, ethnic identity, and more.

Many conservatives responded negatively, which at first perplexed me. Slavery was a huge part of American history and has affected every facet of our society. A collection of articles outlining this history seems as good a topic as any to write about.

But zoomed out from the mostly mundane minutiae of individual articles in the absence of slavery and thus without as much African influence in our music, what wouldAmerican music sound like? a larger concern animates the 1619 Project. The project's central purpose is not simply to educate Americans about the history of labor accounting from plantation to data visualization, or an account of the history of brutal sugar cultivation, but to give a specific narrative about what America is.

The project's summary makes the aim quite clear: "[The 1619 Project] aims to reframe the country's history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are."

Considered this way, the 1619 Project looks very different. It isn't mostly about helping Americans understand the role played by plantation agriculture in American history. It's mostly about convincing Americans that "America" and "slavery" are essentially synonyms.

It's mostly about trying to tell readers they should feel sort of, kind of, at least a little bit bad about being American, because, didn't you hear? As several articles say explicitly, America, in its basic DNA, is not a liberal democracy, constitutional republic, or federation. It's a slave society.


Let's Start with the First Thing Wrong Here


There are a lot of ways to attack this story. But the simplest place to start is the central conceit of the project: that year, 1619.

1619 is commonly cited as the date slavery first arrived in "America." No matter that historians mostly consider the 1619 date a red herring. Enslaved people were working in English Bermuda in 1616. Spanish colonies and forts in today's Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina had enslaved Africans throughout the mid-to-late 1500s: in fact, a slave rebellion in 1526 helped end the Spanish attempt at settling South Carolina.

The presence of Spanish power continued to inhibit English settlement of the deep south basically until the Revolutionary War. In some sense, the 1526 San Miguel de Guadeloupe rebellion cleared the way for English settlement of South Carolina.

Of course, when the English did arrive in South Carolina, they struggled to make a living. Early settlers survived on a trade of buckskins and vegetables. It was not until South Carolinians fought the Yamasee Wars of 1715-1717, and sold between 20,000 and 50,000 kidnapped Native Americans into slavery into New England and the Caribbean, that South Carolinians had the capital to buy enough African slaves to get rice and indigo plantations up and running.

But before 1526, slavery was already ongoing in the eventual United States. The earliest slave society in our present country, and our most recent slavery society, was in Puerto Rico. The island's Spanish overlords were enslaving the Taino natives by 1500. By 1513, the Taino population had shrunk dramatically due to brutal violence and disease. Thus, Spain brought the first African slaves to Puerto Rico.

Chattel slavery in Puerto Rico continued, despite many "Royal Graces" easing life for free blacks and sometimes promising eventual emancipation, until 1873. Even then, slaves had to buy their own liberty. It's not clear when the last slave was free in Puerto Rico, but it would still have been a fresh memory in 1898 when the United States gained control from Spain.

Slavery in America did not begin in 1619. It began in 1513. Any argument for a 1619 date implicitly suggests that the American project is an inherently Anglo project: that other regions, like Texas, California, Louisiana, and Puerto Rico, have subordinate histories that aren't really, truly, equal as American origin stories.

In essence, the 1619 date for the beginning of slavery sets up a story of America as an essentially Anglo project that African-Americans were forced into and now claim their share of. But in reality, our country has many origins: French Cajuns and Huguenots, Swedes in Delaware, Dutch in New York, Russians in Alaska, Mexicans in the southwest, Spanish in Florida and Puerto Rico, and of course Native Americans everywhere.



Full Story



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#2 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 11:05 AM

Welcome to the Memory Hole Winston.
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#3 User is offline   Howsithangin 

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 12:59 PM

Bored to f'ing death of the subject, frankly. Been hearing it book, chapter and verse since elementary school.

Currently, the incessant whining about the subject serves two political purposes, and nothing more: 1. To reframe and undermine our national identify and pride. In Barry's words, "to bring us down a peg". 2. to justify more wealth redistribution to those who won't work. QED. :coffeenpc:
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#4 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 08:02 PM

View PostHowsithangin, on 25 August 2019 - 12:59 PM, said:

Bored to f'ing death of the subject, frankly. Been hearing it book, chapter and verse since elementary school.

Currently, the incessant whining about the subject serves two political purposes, and nothing more: 1. To reframe and undermine our national identify and pride. In Barry's words, "to bring us down a peg". 2. to justify more wealth redistribution to those who won't work. QED. :coffeenpc:


Yeah, that, in Spades (Oops, have I offended anyone).

Pick a Year, any year. I could make argument FOR or AGAINST. But... So frickin' what? It's useful only as an academic exercise that only means somethings to those jagoffs who can't get their jollies elsewhere.
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