RightNation.US
News (Home) | Righters' Blog | Hollywood Halfwits | Our Store | New User Intro | Link to us | Support Us

RightNation.US: Nature declining at ‘unprecedented’ rate, UN study warns - RightNation.US

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Nature declining at ‘unprecedented’ rate, UN study warns Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

  • <no title>
  • View gallery
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 36,035
  • Joined: 13-January 04

Posted 07 May 2019 - 07:12 AM

Nature declining at 'unprecedented' rate, UN study warns
Monday, May 06, 2019 - 01:00 PM
Irish Examiner

<More Doom Here>

Wildlife and habitats are declining at an "unprecedented" rate worldwide which directly threatens human beings, a major new study has warned. Up to a million species of plants and animals are at risk of extinction, a greater number than ever before in human history. Many could vanish within decades, the UN-backed global assessment reveals. Scientists warn that the natural world is deteriorating faster than ever as a direct result of human activity, eroding "the very foundations" of economies, livelihoods, food, health and quality of life worldwide.

A huge transformation is needed across the economy and society to protect and restore nature, which provides people with food, medicines and other materials, crop pollination, fresh water, and quality of life. Without such "transformational change", the damage will continue or worsen up to 2050 and beyond, posing a direct threat to human well-being around the world, the study said. It will also undermine existing global efforts to tackle poverty and hunger, improve health and curb climate change.

The experts warned that "vested interests" would oppose changes to the status quo, from which they benefit through things such as subsidies or a lack of regulation, but this opposition could be overcome for the public good. The three-year global assessment on the state of nature from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) has involved more than 450 experts from 50 countries. It looked at changes to the natural world over the past five decades, during which time the human population has doubled and demand for energy and materials has increased significantly, and sets out scenarios for the future.

Habitats, wild animals and plants and even domesticated breeds are in decline or vanishing as a direct result of human activity, and the rate at which species are becoming extinct is accelerating. The biggest cause of wildlife losses is change to the way land or marine environments are used, followed by direct exploitation of animals and plants, climate change, pollution and invasive species. Three-quarters of the world's land has been "significantly altered" by human activity, with forests cut down and grassland ploughed up for crops or livestock and the spread of cities, industry and infrastructure such as roads.

The study, which drew on thousands of pieces of evidence, also found that rising global temperatures were already having an impact on nature and the effects would increase in the coming decades. Plastic pollution has increased 10-fold in the seas since 1980, harming turtles, seabirds and mammals, fertiliser run-off has caused "dead zones" in the oceans, land is becoming less productive, and the loss of pollinators puts crops at risk. Leading British scientist and chairman of the IPBES Robert Watson said: "The health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever.

"We are eroding the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide." He added: "The report also tells us that it is not too late to make a difference, but only if we start now at every level from local to global."

(snip)

<More Doom Here>
0

#2 User is online   zurg 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 28,291
  • Joined: 19-October 09

Posted 07 May 2019 - 12:13 PM

I’m sure there’s a novel solution. I can disclose it right now.
1) socialists must be in charge
2) extremely high taxes must be collected
3) the end for you and me; not for the socialist masters.
0

#3 User is offline   Tikk 

  • Oh Rrrrrreeeaaaally?
  • Group: Bronze
  • Posts: 8,798
  • Joined: 16-December 03

Posted 07 May 2019 - 12:59 PM

Anyone want to bet that they don't place the blame on the countries that actually do the polluting?

And anyone want to bet that the blame they do place is directly proportional to a combination of GDP and individual liberty?
0

#4 User is online   SARGE 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Bronze
  • Posts: 10,909
  • Joined: 26-June 03

Posted 07 May 2019 - 04:44 PM

View PostMTP Reggie, on 07 May 2019 - 07:12 AM, said:

Nature declining at 'unprecedented' rate, UN study warns
Monday, May 06, 2019 - 01:00 PM
Irish Examiner

<More Doom Here>

Wildlife and habitats are declining at an "unprecedented" rate worldwide which directly threatens human beings, a major new study has warned. [size="2"]Up to a million species of plants and animals are at risk of extinction, a greater number than ever before in human history.

[snip]

Habitats, wild animals and plants and even domesticated breeds are in decline or vanishing as a direct result of human activity, and the rate at which species are becoming extinct is accelerating. Here>[/url][/color][/b]

[snip]


:hairpull: Hyperbole, ignorance, and flat-out stupidity.

"Unprecedented" means never done or known before. This is pure hype, bullschidt, and a total lie. We know of at least five major mass extinctions (up to 20 depending on the parameters of the definition):

1. Ordovician–Silurian extinction - 450–440 Ma (million years ago), two events occurred that killed off 27% of all families, 57% of all genera and 60% to 70% of all species.

2. Late Devonian extinction: 375–360 Ma, 19% of all families, 50% of all genera and at least 70% of all species.

3.Permian–Triassic extinction event: 252 Ma, Earth's largest extinction killed 57% of all families, 83% of all genera and 90% to 96% of all species

4.Triassic–Jurassic extinction event: (End Triassic): 201.3 Ma, About 23% of all families, 48% of all genera (20% of marine families and 55% of marine genera) and 70% to 75% of all species.

5.Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event: 66 Ma, About 17% of all families, 50% of all genera[7] and 75% of all species became extinct.

So what if domestic breeds are going extinct. They were genetically engineered by humans through selective breeding. If they no longer serve their intended purpose or are supplanted by superior breed why keep them? Touchy-feely nostalgia.

these are just from a quick skim.

I'm sure when read the entire article there'll be more.
0

#5 User is offline   Bookdoc 

  • Daddy's little girl
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 5,165
  • Joined: 07-September 05

Posted 07 May 2019 - 06:20 PM

It's the silly u.n.-who gives a rats a$$?

This post has been edited by Bookdoc: 07 May 2019 - 06:21 PM

0

#6 User is offline   Howsithangin 

  • The more ppl I meet, the more I like my cats
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 27,813
  • Joined: 07-March 08

Posted 07 May 2019 - 10:40 PM

Hyperbole, of course. But that's what the media does.

Where this has a grain of truth is that this decimation is taking place in third-world <censored>holes, which are notoriously dictatorial and socialist. What happened to the Soviet Union and the Eastern Block during communism for instance, is beyond description. Chernobyl is the one people know of, but there were others. The lasting effects of their malfeasance is still felt in certain areas. And such destruction continues in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. But the blame is always put squarely on whitey in The West.

In contrast, the environment in the U.S., Canada, and Western Europe has made great strides in the last 40 years. The only real problems being overdevelopment and habitat loss, and overfishing (though that last one can for the most part be pinned on East Asian fishing fleets). But this doesn't make the news bc for reasons that we all know.

I can provide examples, if requested.

This post has been edited by Howsithangin: 07 May 2019 - 10:42 PM

0

#7 User is offline   Howsithangin 

  • The more ppl I meet, the more I like my cats
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 27,813
  • Joined: 07-March 08

Posted 07 May 2019 - 10:44 PM

View PostSARGE, on 07 May 2019 - 04:44 PM, said:

:hairpull: Hyperbole, ignorance, and flat-out stupidity.

"Unprecedented" means never done or known before. This is pure hype, bullschidt, and a total lie. We know of at least five major mass extinctions (up to 20 depending on the parameters of the definition):

1. Ordovician–Silurian extinction - 450–440 Ma (million years ago), two events occurred that killed off 27% of all families, 57% of all genera and 60% to 70% of all species.

2. Late Devonian extinction: 375–360 Ma, 19% of all families, 50% of all genera and at least 70% of all species.

3.Permian–Triassic extinction event: 252 Ma, Earth's largest extinction killed 57% of all families, 83% of all genera and 90% to 96% of all species

4.Triassic–Jurassic extinction event: (End Triassic): 201.3 Ma, About 23% of all families, 48% of all genera (20% of marine families and 55% of marine genera) and 70% to 75% of all species.

5.Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event: 66 Ma, About 17% of all families, 50% of all genera[7] and 75% of all species became extinct.

So what if domestic breeds are going extinct. They were genetically engineered by humans through selective breeding. If they no longer serve their intended purpose or are supplanted by superior breed why keep them? Touchy-feely nostalgia.

these are just from a quick skim.

I'm sure when read the entire article there'll be more.


Paint me impressed! :thumbsup: :welldone: Are you a geologist? Or did you stay in a Holiday Inn Express? :P

Yours is a great example of why geohistorical knowledge is important when discussing these sky-is-falling environmental claims.
0

#8 User is online   SARGE 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Bronze
  • Posts: 10,909
  • Joined: 26-June 03

Posted 08 May 2019 - 12:17 AM

View PostHowsithangin, on 07 May 2019 - 10:44 PM, said:

Paint me impressed! :thumbsup: :welldone: Are you a geologist? Or did you stay in a Holiday Inn Express? :P

Yours is a great example of why geohistorical knowledge is important when discussing these sky-is-falling environmental claims.


I'm not a geologist. I'm a retired biologist with a lifelong fascination for paleontology.

Going to Utah next month to dig for trilobites at the Wheeler Shale formation.

Thanks for the kind words.
0

#9 User is offline   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

  • Pissing off all of the right people
  • Group: Silver
  • Posts: 30,995
  • Joined: 14-October 03

Posted 08 May 2019 - 12:59 AM

View PostBookdoc, on 07 May 2019 - 06:20 PM, said:

It's the silly u.n.-who gives a rats a$$?


:yeahthat: :exactly:
0

#10 User is offline   Howsithangin 

  • The more ppl I meet, the more I like my cats
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 27,813
  • Joined: 07-March 08

Posted 08 May 2019 - 01:36 AM

View PostSARGE, on 08 May 2019 - 12:17 AM, said:

I'm not a geologist. I'm a retired biologist with a lifelong fascination for paleontology.

Going to Utah next month to dig for trilobites at the Wheeler Shale formation.

Thanks for the kind words.


nice
0

#11 User is offline   Hieronymous 

  • Men with ropes around their necks don't always hang
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 9,082
  • Joined: 16-April 09

Posted 08 May 2019 - 08:06 AM

Change the headline to $$$, since that is what this is all about.
0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users