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#1 User is offline   Martin 

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 10:13 AM


THE DEMOCRATS' DILEMMA

By: William Voegeli http://www.claremont...ocrats-dilemma/

In this article in the Claremont Review, Voegeli cites two Democrat authors whose books he has reviewed. He claims they make a similar observation about the attitude of working class people toward the 1% versus the 20%, the upper middle class:

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Two recent books—White Working Class (reviewed on page 27) by Joan C. Williams, a professor at U.C. Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, and Dream Hoarders by Richard V. Reeves of the Brookings Institution—gauge the chasm between this group of voters and the Democratic Party in ways that give little reason to expect economic populism will repair the relationship. Throughout 2016, for example, Democrats made clear their belief that working-class voters wouldn’t and shouldn’t put their faith in a billionaire real estate mogul. It didn’t work out that way, Williams argues, because the white working class “resents professionals” of the sort over-represented in the rainbow base coalition, “but admires the rich.” Members of the working class are not rich, of course, but find the desire to be rich entirely comprehensible. By contrast, why someone would want to be, say, a community organizer is baffling and more than a little disquieting. Worse, members of the working class have little direct contact with the rich, but a good deal with professionals—much of which consists of being bossed around, second-guessed, and condescended to....Echoing Williams, Reeves says that Trump supporters without a lot of money “have no problem with the rich,” but detest “upper middle-class professionals: journalists, scholars, technocrats, managers, bureaucrats, the people with letters after their names.”

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I agree with Voegeli, who agrees with Joan Williams and Richard Reeves on this point. Working class people resent being bossed around and condescended to by people with letters after their names (full disclosure--I am one). Yet, that is the main thing the Democratic Party wants to do, force you to hire armies of people with letters after their names to boss you around because they think the initials after their names entitle them to do so and who insist that it's for your own good.

I can well understand why working class people scorn and resent people with initials after their names. What I wonder, and I would like Right Nation readers to explain to me, is why the people with initials after their names cannot understand why working class people detest them.
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#2 User is offline   ThePatriot 

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 11:20 AM

View PostMartin, on 09 November 2017 - 10:13 AM, said:

THE DEMOCRATS' DILEMMA

By: William Voegeli http://www.claremont...ocrats-dilemma/

In this article in the Claremont Review, Voegeli cites two Democrat authors whose books he has reviewed. He claims they make a similar observation about the attitude of working class people toward the 1% versus the 20%, the upper middle class:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Two recent books—White Working Class (reviewed on page 27) by Joan C. Williams, a professor at U.C. Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, and Dream Hoarders by Richard V. Reeves of the Brookings Institution—gauge the chasm between this group of voters and the Democratic Party in ways that give little reason to expect economic populism will repair the relationship. Throughout 2016, for example, Democrats made clear their belief that working-class voters wouldn’t and shouldn’t put their faith in a billionaire real estate mogul. It didn’t work out that way, Williams argues, because the white working class “resents professionals” of the sort over-represented in the rainbow base coalition, “but admires the rich.” Members of the working class are not rich, of course, but find the desire to be rich entirely comprehensible. By contrast, why someone would want to be, say, a community organizer is baffling and more than a little disquieting. Worse, members of the working class have little direct contact with the rich, but a good deal with professionals—much of which consists of being bossed around, second-guessed, and condescended to....Echoing Williams, Reeves says that Trump supporters without a lot of money “have no problem with the rich,” but detest “upper middle-class professionals: journalists, scholars, technocrats, managers, bureaucrats, the people with letters after their names.”

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
I agree with Voegeli, who agrees with Joan Williams and Richard Reeves on this point. Working class people resent being bossed around and condescended to by people with letters after their names (full disclosure--I am one). Yet, that is the main thing the Democratic Party wants to do, force you to hire armies of people with letters after their names to boss you around because they think the initials after their names entitle them to do so and who insist that it's for your own good.

I can well understand why working class people scorn and resent people with initials after their names. What I wonder, and I would like Right Nation readers to explain to me, is why the people with initials after their names cannot understand why working class people detest them.

Because most of those with letters after their names are Democrats, so by their very nature, they want to force others to abide by their world view.
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#3 User is offline   MADGestic 

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 09:08 PM

This is a very interesting editorial; thank you for sharing. There's plenty of food-for-thought in there, although I noticed that the introduction and conclusion are not necessarily supported by the rest of the content. Perhaps I missed it but the author does not explicitly explain how the end of the current political party duopoly will come about.

I have long maintained that American politicking is "broken" and needs to be "reset" or refurbished but that kind of change is not going to happen until the electorate collectively revolts against the political status quo. In the current environment of tribalistic polarization, that seems very unlikely. This editorial is very observant of the divisions but offers no suggestions for unification.

I believe the white, non-degreed, working class is a relatively declining population, not only due to more folks earning college degrees but also because of the rise of the computer- and Internet-savvy service and technology sectors. Politically appealing to that population segment may eventually be an issue that resolves itself. I'm not saying this is a good thing, just that it might happen.

Perhaps due to my birth, life, and career in the Northeast, I have not experienced the working-class detestation premised in your query. Or maybe it's because I come from working-class families, spent my earlier years in such employment, and have no initials after my name, that I seem to get along pretty well with folks of all stripes, even though I've accomplished socioeconomic "upward mobility" as described in the editorial. If working-class folks detest people who are degreed and relatively affluent, I have no firsthand experience to explain it.

Speculating: These folks remember (or learned about) the post-WWII era when manufacturing jobs were plentiful and upward mobility was virtually guaranteed. The unrestrained capitalism of the "robber baron" era was behind us, workers had rights and benefits, and things were fairly rosy. The "American Dream" of little white house, little white fence, and little white neighbors was achievable without a college degree. How times have changed.

So, no, I do not "understand why working class people detest" folks who have accomplished what they presumably desire. Envy must be part of it but I'm sure the explanation is more complex than that.

This post has been edited by MADGestic: 10 November 2017 - 10:24 PM

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