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Nurses helped sneak dog of dying man into the hospital to say goodbye Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   oki 

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 02:41 PM

Although Ellie’s grandpa was unresponsive at the time Lil Fee was in the hospital, Ellie says it was very emotional for all of the members of the family.

“For the first time that day, he moved his arm in attempts to pet his Lil Fee,” she says. “It was a moment I’ll never forget.”


https://www.yahoo.co...-183536891.html

I get the whole allergies, hygiene and making sure the pet doesn't cause trouble part.
BUT, for God's sake's this is someone on their death bed or in serious shape, bringing a four legged loved one in for just a few minutes IS one hell of a boost. As someone who has in the Hospital twice for a couple days over the last 9 or so years, I can tell you had I been stuck in there(Hospital) for much longer either time I would have been asking for my Fuzzball, even for a just a few minutes.

Animals have PROVEN time and again they can be critical in either helping people heal faster by boosting their spirit/moral or giving peace and comfort in a persons final moments. Both of those should be viewed as invaluable parts of medicine.
Thankfully, more and more hospitals are allowing four legged friends to pop in and say high as long as they don't cause trouble or there isn't allergy issues.

The Nursing home my dad is in allows four legged visitors, my moms Yorkie always likes seeing my dad, as well my little Fuzzball 'made the rounds' some last time we where there to. Anything which can boost a patients spirit should be considered.

Oki
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#2 User is offline   Italian Biker 

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 03:02 PM

View Postoki, on 09 November 2017 - 02:41 PM, said:

Although Ellie’s grandpa was unresponsive at the time Lil Fee was in the hospital, Ellie says it was very emotional for all of the members of the family.

“For the first time that day, he moved his arm in attempts to pet his Lil Fee,” she says. “It was a moment I’ll never forget.”


https://www.yahoo.co...-183536891.html

I get the whole allergies, hygiene and making sure the pet doesn't cause trouble part.
BUT, for God's sake's this is someone on their death bed or in serious shape, bringing a four legged loved one in for just a few minutes IS one hell of a boost. As someone who has in the Hospital twice for a couple days over the last 9 or so years, I can tell you had I been stuck in there(Hospital) for much longer either time I would have been asking for my Fuzzball, even for a just a few minutes.

Animals have PROVEN time and again they can be critical in either helping people heal faster by boosting their spirit/moral or giving peace and comfort in a persons final moments. Both of those should be viewed as invaluable parts of medicine.
Thankfully, more and more hospitals are allowing four legged friends to pop in and say high as long as they don't cause trouble or there isn't allergy issues.

The Nursing home my dad is in allows four legged visitors, my moms Yorkie always likes seeing my dad, as well my little Fuzzball 'made the rounds' some last time we where there to. Anything which can boost a patients spirit should be considered.

Oki

Nursing homes have lower regulatory standards than hospitals, and dogs are allowed in them and not considered a violation. While I myself am also a dog lover, I do not excuse this at all. There could be an immune suppressed person somewhere in the vicinity and some germ from the dog could be harmful to that person. There is no justifiable excuse to endanger others in the process of trying to make a dying man happy. As touching as the story may be, it's wrong.
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#3 User is offline   Ladybird 

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 03:17 PM

Nice story. I’m glad the grandpa and the dog were able to have their goodbye.

A hospice or nursing home should honor requests like these. Not sure about a hospital, unless there was a special section where animals are allowed.
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#4 User is offline   oki 

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 03:57 PM

View PostItalian Biker, on 09 November 2017 - 03:02 PM, said:

Nursing homes have lower regulatory standards than hospitals, and dogs are allowed in them and not considered a violation. While I myself am also a dog lover, I do not excuse this at all. There could be an immune suppressed person somewhere in the vicinity and some germ from the dog could be harmful to that person. There is no justifiable excuse to endanger others in the process of trying to make a dying man happy. As touching as the story may be, it's wrong.



Here is the rub though, what if the pooch was the patient or patients family service animal? I get allergies part, BUT, there where no accommodations that could what so ever be made? An outdoor area they could have wheeled the man to, a lobby area etc. You develop a safe route if there are patients this could adversely affect, and develop a safe route. The allergies are typically from dander on animal hair. That hair/dander could just as easily or more so be transferred by people who have hair on their clothing.

Just like the cell phone bans of old better to use a blanket 'just in case' then actually be smart about it and only do it where or when it's needed.
True story, I work in I.T. A few years back one of our Cell Techs was working in a hospital and one of the staff members scolded him a bit about the no cell phone rules. Here is the rub, HE WAS TURNING UP A CELL SITE AT LOCAL HOSPITAL. The room is where the equipment was to be located.
The reason for the site was so that the doctors could ditch pagers and instead use their cells as coverage in the building was spotty at best.

The logic is the same, just do a blanket ban just in case of a one off instead of case by case precautions and safeguards.
Besides, a patient with allergy or immune system issues is much more likely to have a bad reaction from a typical service dog as it's not in a bag and sheds vs a bagged Yorkie due in large part to the fact that they don't shed. Or, you are sharing a room with someone and a visitor comes in with a coat full of dog hair.

I understand the concern, and it's damn valid, just saying there are smart ways to address it.


Oki
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#5 User is offline   intotheblackhole 

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 06:51 PM

Why is he in a hospital? He is dying. He should be at home where he belongs. I intend to die at home if possible.
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#6 User is offline   Italian Biker 

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 08:41 AM

View Postoki, on 09 November 2017 - 03:57 PM, said:

Here is the rub though, what if the pooch was the patient or patients family service animal? I get allergies part, BUT, there where no accommodations that could what so ever be made? An outdoor area they could have wheeled the man to, a lobby area etc. You develop a safe route if there are patients this could adversely affect, and develop a safe route. The allergies are typically from dander on animal hair. That hair/dander could just as easily or more so be transferred by people who have hair on their clothing.

Just like the cell phone bans of old better to use a blanket 'just in case' then actually be smart about it and only do it where or when it's needed.
True story, I work in I.T. A few years back one of our Cell Techs was working in a hospital and one of the staff members scolded him a bit about the no cell phone rules. Here is the rub, HE WAS TURNING UP A CELL SITE AT LOCAL HOSPITAL. The room is where the equipment was to be located.
The reason for the site was so that the doctors could ditch pagers and instead use their cells as coverage in the building was spotty at best.

The logic is the same, just do a blanket ban just in case of a one off instead of case by case precautions and safeguards.
Besides, a patient with allergy or immune system issues is much more likely to have a bad reaction from a typical service dog as it's not in a bag and sheds vs a bagged Yorkie due in large part to the fact that they don't shed. Or, you are sharing a room with someone and a visitor comes in with a coat full of dog hair.

I understand the concern, and it's damn valid, just saying there are smart ways to address it.


Oki

Who will cover the cost of a "dogs allowed" wing of a hospital. Yes, they maybe could have brought the guy outside, but his health may have been such that moving him would have been bad. The weather may not have been cooperative. Most issues, if someone is already in a hospital, the service dog will not be necessary due to hospital staff.
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#7 User is offline   oki 

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 09:15 AM

View PostItalian Biker, on 10 November 2017 - 08:41 AM, said:

Who will cover the cost of a "dogs allowed" wing of a hospital. Yes, they maybe could have brought the guy outside, but his health may have been such that moving him would have been bad. The weather may not have been cooperative. Most issues, if someone is already in a hospital, the service dog will not be necessary due to hospital staff.


If the man is at deaths door and could go at any moment then I doubt 'life threatening' is much of issue at this point.
Besides, do hospitals not have to allow service animals? Or, how would they deal with someone coming in who was covered in dog hair, would they deny them entry just in case as well? I honestly understand the allergy risk, but at the same time I think there is a bit more to this on the hospitals end.

Oki
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#8 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 09:41 AM

View Postoki, on 10 November 2017 - 09:15 AM, said:

If the man is at deaths door and could go at any moment then I doubt 'life threatening' is much of issue at this point.
Besides, do hospitals not have to allow service animals? Or, how would they deal with someone coming in who was covered in dog hair, would they deny them entry just in case as well? I honestly understand the allergy risk, but at the same time I think there is a bit more to this on the hospitals end.

Oki


There's actually an answer to that: "YES", mostly, HOWEVER bear in mind that ADA has a very strict definition of "Service Animal"; this case almost certainly doesn't fit.

How “Service Animal” Is Defined

Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.


AND,

Where Service Animals Are Allowed

Under the ADA, State and local governments, businesses, and nonprofit organizations that serve the public generally must allow service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas of the facility where the public is normally allowed to go. For example, in a hospital it would be inappropriate to exclude a service animal from areas such as patient rooms, clinics, cafeterias, or examination rooms. However, it may be appropriate to exclude a service animal from operating rooms or burn units where the animal’s presence may compromise a sterile environment.


Source: U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section: ADA Requirements: Service Animals
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#9 User is offline   oki 

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 03:51 PM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 10 November 2017 - 09:41 AM, said:

There's actually an answer to that: "YES", mostly, HOWEVER bear in mind that ADA has a very strict definition of "Service Animal"; this case almost certainly doesn't fit.

How “Service Animal” Is Defined

Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.


AND,

Where Service Animals Are Allowed

Under the ADA, State and local governments, businesses, and nonprofit organizations that serve the public generally must allow service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas of the facility where the public is normally allowed to go. For example, in a hospital it would be inappropriate to exclude a service animal from areas such as patient rooms, clinics, cafeterias, or examination rooms. However, it may be appropriate to exclude a service animal from operating rooms or burn units where the animal’s presence may compromise a sterile environment.


Source: U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section: ADA Requirements: Service Animals


Per service animal I was speaking more in the context of it being for a visitor. Plus, if Dog hair is the issue (allergies) how would they deal with someone coming in whose clothing was covered in it? To be honest it is a very legit concern in some parts of the hospital, but, at the same time I believe they can usually reach some type of accommodation. I really am thinking there is a little more to this story.

Oki
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