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#1 User is offline   Ladybird 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 11:04 AM

Man who attacked classmate with hammer can keep GOP post, Florida state party official says

Los Angeles Times
December 5, 2017

The secretary of a local Republican Party in Florida, who was convicted in a brutal 2007 hammer attack on a high school classmate in Los Angeles, can keep his position, state party leaders have decided.

Rupert Tarsey was elected to the Broward County Republican Executive Committee in May as a party newcomer, outscoring two challengers who’d been around longer. But a few months later, committee members discovered that the 28-year-old had changed his name several years ago and hid a violent past.

When the revelations reached the board in September, some called on him to resign. He refused.

The committee’s chairman, Bob Sutton, tried to suspend him. Tarsey filed a grievance against Sutton with the Florida Republican Party, arguing Sutton didn’t have the legal authority to take that action. Sutton’s attorney filed a cross-grievance against Tarsey.

Florida Republican Party Chairman Blaise Ingoglia resolved those grievances last week, putting both men on probation — Tarsey for one year, Sutton for six months.

<snip>

A decade ago, he was Rupert Ditsworth, a 17-year-old senior at Harvard-Westlake High School, an elite college preparatory academy in Los Angeles.

He invited a schoolmate to lunch one day in May and on their drive back, detoured to a quiet residential street. There, he told her that he had thoughts of suicide. She suggested he drive back to school and see a counselor.

Instead, according to court records, he reached inside his backpack, pulled out a claw hammer and started swinging. He smashed his classmate’s nose and leg, split her scalp and gave her two black eyes.

As part of a plea agreement brokered with prosecutors, he pleaded no contest to one felony count of assault with a deadly weapon, avoided jail time and was sentenced to six years’ probation.

He changed his name and moved to Florida, where he received extensive mental health treatment, excelled in college and earned a master’s degree in business administration. Last year, he successfully petitioned to reduce the felony to a misdemeanor.

<snip>

Link

Lovely that this young man was given a second chance. Not many kids who had attempted to kill a girl by smashing her head in with a hammer would be provided such a sweet deal.
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#2 User is online   Noclevermoniker 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 11:23 AM

View PostLadybird, on 05 December 2017 - 11:04 AM, said:

Man who attacked classmate with hammer can keep GOP post, Florida state party official says


December 5, 2017
The secretary of a local Republican Party in Florida, who was convicted in a brutal 2007 hammer attack on a high school classmate in Los Angeles, can keep his position, state party leaders have decided.

Rupert Tarsey was elected to the Broward County Republican Executive Committee in May as a party newcomer, outscoring two challengers who’d been around longer. But a few months later, committee members discovered that the 28-year-old had changed his name several years ago and hid a violent past.

When the revelations reached the board in September, some called on him to resign. He refused.

The committee’s chairman, Bob Sutton, tried to suspend him. Tarsey filed a grievance against Sutton with the Florida Republican Party, arguing Sutton didn’t have the legal authority to take that action. Sutton’s attorney filed a cross-grievance against Tarsey.

Florida Republican Party Chairman Blaise Ingoglia resolved those grievances last week, putting both men on probation — Tarsey for one year, Sutton for six months.

<snip>

A decade ago, he was Rupert Ditsworth, a 17-year-old senior at Harvard-Westlake High School, an elite college preparatory academy in Los Angeles.

He invited a schoolmate to lunch one day in May and on their drive back, detoured to a quiet residential street. There, he told her that he had thoughts of suicide. She suggested he drive back to school and see a counselor.

Instead, according to court records, he reached inside his backpack, pulled out a claw hammer and started swinging. He smashed his classmate’s nose and leg, split her scalp and gave her two black eyes.

As part of a plea agreement brokered with prosecutors, he pleaded no contest to one felony count of assault with a deadly weapon, avoided jail time and was sentenced to six years’ probation.

He changed his name and moved to Florida, where he received extensive mental health treatment, excelled in college and earned a master’s degree in business administration. Last year, he successfully petitioned to reduce the felony to a misdemeanor.

<snip>

Link

Lovely that this young man was given a second chance. Not many kids who had attempted to kill a girl by smashing her head in with a hammer would be provided such a sweet deal.

Is there a point hidden in your facetiousness?
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#3 User is online   gravelrash 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 11:27 AM

A plea agreement is not the same as a conviction. That being said, I agree that keeping him around casts a pall over the Broward County Republican Party.

And what is it with Broward County? It seems politicians and officials down there are trying too hard to make it the Chicago of the South.
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#4 User is offline   oki 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 11:27 AM

View PostLadybird, on 05 December 2017 - 11:04 AM, said:

Man who attacked classmate with hammer can keep GOP post, Florida state party official says


December 5, 2017
The secretary of a local Republican Party in Florida, who was convicted in a brutal 2007 hammer attack on a high school classmate in Los Angeles, can keep his position, state party leaders have decided.

Rupert Tarsey was elected to the Broward County Republican Executive Committee in May as a party newcomer, outscoring two challengers who’d been around longer. But a few months later, committee members discovered that the 28-year-old had changed his name several years ago and hid a violent past.

When the revelations reached the board in September, some called on him to resign. He refused.

The committee’s chairman, Bob Sutton, tried to suspend him. Tarsey filed a grievance against Sutton with the Florida Republican Party, arguing Sutton didn’t have the legal authority to take that action. Sutton’s attorney filed a cross-grievance against Tarsey.

Florida Republican Party Chairman Blaise Ingoglia resolved those grievances last week, putting both men on probation — Tarsey for one year, Sutton for six months.

<snip>

A decade ago, he was Rupert Ditsworth, a 17-year-old senior at Harvard-Westlake High School, an elite college preparatory academy in Los Angeles.

He invited a schoolmate to lunch one day in May and on their drive back, detoured to a quiet residential street. There, he told her that he had thoughts of suicide. She suggested he drive back to school and see a counselor.

Instead, according to court records, he reached inside his backpack, pulled out a claw hammer and started swinging. He smashed his classmate’s nose and leg, split her scalp and gave her two black eyes.

As part of a plea agreement brokered with prosecutors, he pleaded no contest to one felony count of assault with a deadly weapon, avoided jail time and was sentenced to six years’ probation.

He changed his name and moved to Florida, where he received extensive mental health treatment, excelled in college and earned a master’s degree in business administration. Last year, he successfully petitioned to reduce the felony to a misdemeanor.

<snip>

Link

Lovely that this young man was given a second chance. Not many kids who had attempted to kill a girl by smashing her head in with a hammer would be provided such a sweet deal.



Sounds like he would make a great Kennedy. Although not Politicians, the name Wahlberg also comes to mind.

Oki

This post has been edited by oki: 05 December 2017 - 11:28 AM

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#5 User is offline   intotheblackhole 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 12:17 PM

If he had shady accusations of sexual harassment in the past he would be out of there.
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#6 User is offline   Italian Biker 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 01:12 PM

View PostLadybird, on 05 December 2017 - 11:04 AM, said:

Man who attacked classmate with hammer can keep GOP post, Florida state party official says


December 5, 2017
The secretary of a local Republican Party in Florida, who was convicted in a brutal 2007 hammer attack on a high school classmate in Los Angeles, can keep his position, state party leaders have decided.

Rupert Tarsey was elected to the Broward County Republican Executive Committee in May as a party newcomer, outscoring two challengers who’d been around longer. But a few months later, committee members discovered that the 28-year-old had changed his name several years ago and hid a violent past.

When the revelations reached the board in September, some called on him to resign. He refused.

The committee’s chairman, Bob Sutton, tried to suspend him. Tarsey filed a grievance against Sutton with the Florida Republican Party, arguing Sutton didn’t have the legal authority to take that action. Sutton’s attorney filed a cross-grievance against Tarsey.

Florida Republican Party Chairman Blaise Ingoglia resolved those grievances last week, putting both men on probation — Tarsey for one year, Sutton for six months.

<snip>

A decade ago, he was Rupert Ditsworth, a 17-year-old senior at Harvard-Westlake High School, an elite college preparatory academy in Los Angeles.

He invited a schoolmate to lunch one day in May and on their drive back, detoured to a quiet residential street. There, he told her that he had thoughts of suicide. She suggested he drive back to school and see a counselor.

Instead, according to court records, he reached inside his backpack, pulled out a claw hammer and started swinging. He smashed his classmate’s nose and leg, split her scalp and gave her two black eyes.

As part of a plea agreement brokered with prosecutors, he pleaded no contest to one felony count of assault with a deadly weapon, avoided jail time and was sentenced to six years’ probation.

He changed his name and moved to Florida, where he received extensive mental health treatment, excelled in college and earned a master’s degree in business administration. Last year, he successfully petitioned to reduce the felony to a misdemeanor.

<snip>

Link

Lovely that this young man was given a second chance. Not many kids who had attempted to kill a girl by smashing her head in with a hammer would be provided such a sweet deal.

I agree. He should have done real time. And so should that Brock Turner scum bag. Yes, he turned his life around afterwards, but justice still wasn't served to begin with. In another high profile case, a two to three years ago, Mark Wahlberg, tried to get his felony conviction wiped. He put a guy in the hospital, with much worse injuries then this girl, and yet the nation embraces him. Now I believe the real reason is because of the Wahlburger franchise, and trying to get liquor licenses for the locations and can't get one with a felony conviction.
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#7 User is offline   Ladybird 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 01:32 PM

View PostItalian Biker, on 05 December 2017 - 01:12 PM, said:

I agree. He should have done real time. And so should that Brock Turner scum bag. Yes, he turned his life around afterwards, but justice still wasn't served to begin with. In another high profile case, a two to three years ago, Mark Wahlberg, tried to get his felony conviction wiped. He put a guy in the hospital, with much worse injuries then this girl, and yet the nation embraces him. Now I believe the real reason is because of the Wahlburger franchise, and trying to get liquor licenses for the locations and can't get one with a felony conviction.


The wahlberg thing was pretty bad. From what read the victim lost sight in one eye. I take him at his word though that he would never do anything like that again. With this Rupert Tarsey character I’m not so sure. Violently attacking a friend that way is psycho behavior. I wouldn’t want him out with any of my nieces. And after basically getting away with it, he goes into public life instead of living a life of quiet anonymity.
I think he’s a mighty peculiar guy to say the least.
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#8 User is online   ThePatriot 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 01:41 PM

View Postintotheblackhole, on 05 December 2017 - 12:17 PM, said:

If he had shady accusations of sexual harassment in the past he would be out of there.

The guy should be in prison - if only he had sent her dirty pictures on his phone instead of bashing her skull in with a hammer...
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#9 User is online   zurg 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 01:44 PM

View PostLadybird, on 05 December 2017 - 01:32 PM, said:

The wahlberg thing was pretty bad. From what read the victim lost sight in one eye. I take him at his word though that he would never do anything like that again. With this Rupert Tarsey character I’m not so sure. Violently attacking a friend that way is psycho behavior. I wouldn’t want him out with any of my nieces. And after basically getting away with it, he goes into public life instead of living a life of quiet anonymity.
I think he’s a mighty peculiar guy to say the least.

The problem is that even if you have a huge majority of people agreeing on this, legal procedures have been inserted that make it difficult or impossible to keep these loonies out.

The best may be to let him run, publish the data, and see normal people (the majority) run away from him. And whoever is around him when he loses should have a CCW.
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#10 User is offline   intotheblackhole 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 02:16 PM

View PostThePatriot, on 05 December 2017 - 01:41 PM, said:

The guy should be in prison - if only he had sent her dirty pictures on his phone instead of bashing her skull in with a hammer...


Yup.
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#11 User is offline   intotheblackhole 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 02:24 PM

View Postzurg, on 05 December 2017 - 01:44 PM, said:

The problem is that even if you have a huge majority of people agreeing on this, legal procedures have been inserted that make it difficult or impossible to keep these loonies out.

The best may be to let him run, publish the data, and see normal people (the majority) run away from him. And whoever is around him when he loses should have a CCW.


Agreed. Voters can vote their morals. Look at DC. They voted in a convicted FELON. That says a lot about the voters.
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#12 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 05:42 PM

View Postgravelrash, on 05 December 2017 - 11:27 AM, said:

A plea agreement is not the same as a conviction. That being said, I agree that keeping him around casts a pall over the Broward County Republican Party.

And what is it with Broward County? It seems politicians and officials down there are trying too hard to make it the Chicago of the South.


Actually, yes it is, at least in Florida. Which would ordinarily make him ineligible to vote in FL. Except that he later got it reduced to Misdemeanor.

Plus, the article says he was 17 at the time. Was he sentenced as a Juvi? If so the record would have been sealed anyway, nobody would probably have ever known if he hadn't petitioned to have it reduced thus 'unsealing' it.

I happen to believe people CAN turn their lives around. I know *I'M* not the person I was in my barfighting days in my 20s. STILL, though, I'd like to see a little more time before I'd vote on 'reformed' in such a case, especially such a violent case; maybe in 10 years he's just never had occasion to get that angry again?

View Postgravelrash, on 05 December 2017 - 11:27 AM, said:

And what is it with Broward County?


My old stomping ground was Palm Beach County to the north and Miami/Dade county to the south of Broward. (Broward county is Ft. Lauderdale and vicinity.) The congressional district I toyed with running for a couple of times was FL-22 which includes parts of Broward.

Politics in that area is, uh, "interesting" in a very "chinese curse" sort of way.
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#13 User is online   zurg 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 05:49 PM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 05 December 2017 - 05:42 PM, said:

Actually, yes it is, at least in Florida. Which would ordinarily make him ineligible to vote in FL. Except that he later got it reduced to Misdemeanor.

Plus, the article says he was 17 at the time. Was he sentenced as a Juvi? If so the record would have been sealed anyway, nobody would probably have ever known if he hadn't petitioned to have it reduced thus 'unsealing' it.

I happen to believe people CAN turn their lives around. I know *I'M* not the person I was in my barfighting days in my 20s. STILL, though, I'd like to see a little more time before I'd vote on 'reformed' in such a case, especially such a violent case; maybe in 10 years he's just never had occasion to get that angry again?



My old stomping ground was Palm Beach County to the north and Miami/Dade county to the south of Broward. (Broward county is Ft. Lauderdale and vicinity.) The congressional district I toyed with running for a couple of times was FL-22 which includes parts of Broward.

Politics in that area is, uh, "interesting" in a very "chinese curse" sort of way.

Psst. Palm Beach County is north of Broward. Palm Beach is north of Fort Lauderdale. Which is north of Miami.
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#14 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 06:35 PM

View Postzurg, on 05 December 2017 - 05:49 PM, said:

Psst. Palm Beach County is north of Broward. Palm Beach is north of Fort Lauderdale. Which is north of Miami.


Did I say it wrong??? "Palm Beach County to the north and Miami/Dade county to the south"???

For what it's worth, just off Clock road in Lantana for a while, then 1/2 a duplex on Peconic court in the "Wellington" part of WPB. Back when anything west of Military Trail was considered "Boonies". The strip club I managed in '84-ish was at 736 Belvedere in WPB.

True Story: One of my few forays into Broward beyond just passing through to Dade (HUGE client in the day was Rinker Cement; HQ in WPB but major cement kiln in Miami) was to stop at the Bahia Mar marina, the fictional home on slip F-18 of, well, YOU know who it was, and I don't even need to say, hoping to catch a glimpse of author John D. MacDonald (Little did I know, he actually live in Ft Myers at the time).

Anyway, sitting at the bar, guy next to me tries to strike up a conversation. Says something about being an author. yeah, right, whatever. He WASN'T John D. Macdonald, so whadoo I care. And he just oozed the vibe of "creep" or "perv", like he should have been a flasher in a raincoat. eventually he moves on.

I get up to pay my tab. Bartender sez, "Do you know who that was?" "No", sez me. "Elmore Leonard, the author". "Oh", sez I, as if I cared and didn't even know WHO EL was at the time except that he WASN'T John D. MacDonald.

This post has been edited by Dean Adam Smithee: 05 December 2017 - 07:05 PM

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#15 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 06:41 PM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 05 December 2017 - 06:35 PM, said:

For what it's worth, just off Clock road in Lantana for a while, then 1/2 a duplex on Peconic court in the "Wellington" part of WPB. Back when anything west of Military Trail was considered "Boonies". The strip club I managed in '84-ish was at 736 Belvedere in WPB.



Ya know... When I started reading this response, my first thought was, "I bet this involves a nudey bar somehow."...
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#16 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 07:09 PM

View PostMTP Reggie, on 05 December 2017 - 06:41 PM, said:

Ya know... When I started reading this response, my first thought was, "I bet this involves a nudey bar somehow."...


Damn. Y'all have me pegged.
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#17 User is online   gravelrash 

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 11:46 AM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 05 December 2017 - 05:42 PM, said:

Actually, yes it is, at least in Florida. Which would ordinarily make him ineligible to vote in FL. Except that he later got it reduced to Misdemeanor.

Plus, the article says he was 17 at the time. Was he sentenced as a Juvi? If so the record would have been sealed anyway, nobody would probably have ever known if he hadn't petitioned to have it reduced thus 'unsealing' it.


Then Florida is wrong. A conviction means that the case was taken to trial and the defendant was found guilty either by a jury or the court. A plea bargain means the prosecution and the defense settled out of court. While nolo contendre is not a conviction. Though it means "guilty for the purposes of sentencing" and that depends on whether the judge lubed his stick before perching on his throne.

The article doesn't make clear whether Rupert Ditsworth was sentenced as a juvenile. You are correct that the record became public due to his own action (as Rupert Tarsey). I just found that the article was misleading stating that he was convicted of a crime when the matter was settled out of court. And if I were a relation to the victim, I would have grabbed my own hammer.
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#18 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 01:39 PM

View Postgravelrash, on 06 December 2017 - 11:46 AM, said:

Then Florida is wrong. A conviction means that the case was taken to trial and the defendant was found guilty either by a jury or the court. A plea bargain means the prosecution and the defense settled out of court. While nolo contendre is not a conviction. Though it means "guilty for the purposes of sentencing" and that depends on whether the judge lubed his stick before perching on his throne.

The article doesn't make clear whether Rupert Ditsworth was sentenced as a juvenile. You are correct that the record became public due to his own action (as Rupert Tarsey). I just found that the article was misleading stating that he was convicted of a crime when the matter was settled out of court. And if I were a relation to the victim, I would have grabbed my own hammer.



A "No Contest" / "Nolo Contendere" plea certainly DOES count as a conviction, in both Florida where the guy lives now AND in California where the offense originally occurred.

A California Law Firm explains it here:

Should I Make a No Contest Plea? What You Need to Know

When a person is charged with a crime, he/she will usually plead “guilty” or “not guilty.” A “guilty” plea is entered if a person believes he/she committed the crime. A “not guilty” plea is entered if a person feels he/she is innocent of the charges. In some cases, a defendant will plead “nolo contendere,” or “no contest.”

A no contest plea is essentially a guilty plea that says you are not going to fight the charges against you but are not admitting guilt. It has the same legal ramifications as a guilty plea. However, a plea of no contest can be more beneficial than a guilty plea in certain cases...

...What Happens in a No Contest Plea?

When a defendant pleads no contest, he/she is telling the court, “I do not wish to contest.” The defendant is not admitting guilt. However, the no contest plea tells the court that the defendant does not want to go to trial for the charge and allows the court to determine a punishment for the charge. The punishment will result in a criminal conviction on the defendant’s record.

Source: Wallin & Klarick, A Law Corporation


That said, YMMV in other states. And I believe there are some states that don't even allow a "No Contest" plea.

It's a moot point anyway, as the guy eventually got it reduced to a misdemeanor.
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#19 User is offline   Howsithangin 

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 02:21 AM

This is bull<censored>! :redhot:

Further, he should be sued 'til his own eye bleeds!
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#20 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 06:58 AM

View PostHowsithangin, on 07 December 2017 - 02:21 AM, said:

This is bull<censored>! :redhot:

Further, he should be sued 'til his own eye bleeds!


From what I understand from the CA Law Firm's site linked above, in CA the sole advantage of pleading "No Contest" rather than "guilty" is that it doesn't count as an admission of guilt in any following civil case.

That doen't mean he can't be sued, it just means the civil case has to start from scratch rather than relying on the conviction. But in this case I suspect the Statute of Limitations has run out, it's likely 2 or 4 years or so.
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