RightNation.US
News (Home) | Righters' Blog | Hollywood Halfwits | Our Store | New User Intro | Link to us | Support Us

RightNation.US: Gavin Newsom: I'm Willing To Take On The Status Quo, Even Within - RightNation.US

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Gavin Newsom: I'm Willing To Take On The Status Quo, Even Within My Own Party Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Liz 

  • 1.4% Neanderthal
  • Group: Moderator
  • Posts: 49,584
  • Joined: 28-February 03

  Posted 09 October 2018 - 10:19 PM

Gavin Newsom: I'm Willing To Take On The Status Quo, Even Within My Own Party

Townhall
Beth Baumann
Posted: Oct 09, 2018 6:40 PM

Excerpt:

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D), who is running to replace Gov. Jerry Brown next month, debated Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox on Monday. Following the debate, Newsom answered reporters' questions about his vision for California's future.

Interestingly enough, Newsom said he'd be willing to take on the status quo, even if that meant taking on his own political party.

"I'm not arguing for the status quo. I'm arguing for change," Newsom told reporters. "I've always been about change...I'm willing to change the order of things. I'm willing to challenge the orthodox, even within my own party. I'm not arguing in any way, shape or form for the status quo but I want to build on its success."

Wait...what?

How can someone be against the status quo and want to change that but also build upon the very thing they say they're against? Isn't that contradictory?

Newsom has been a typical progressive. He's advocated for even stricter gun control laws, net neutrality legislation, greater access to abortions, illegal aliens over American citizens, and the list goes on.

That's not challenging the status quo. That's falling in line with your party.

*snip*

Full Commentary
0

#2 User is online   Noclevermoniker 

  • Wire Dachsies Matter
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 15,847
  • Joined: 13-November 03

Posted 09 October 2018 - 10:23 PM

In other words, he's willing to go even farther crazy left.
0

#3 User is offline   grimreefer 

  • U.S. Merchant Marine
  • View gallery
  • Group: Diamond Community Supporter
  • Posts: 3,723
  • Joined: 18-December 03

Posted 09 October 2018 - 11:22 PM

View PostNoclevermoniker, on 09 October 2018 - 10:23 PM, said:

In other words, he's willing to go even farther crazy left.

:yeahthat: That's the first thing I thought with just reading the headline. Then confirmed when reading the article.
0

#4 User is offline   Martin 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 7,594
  • Joined: 02-July 03

Posted 10 October 2018 - 07:05 AM

California has a worsening fiscal problem. That problem is especially acute in the form of unfunded liabilities of the giant California Public Employee Retirement System (CalPERS) and the California State Teacher Retirement System (CalSTRS). Both of the latter are only about 65% funded yet California law forbids any reduction in the pensions they pay. To keep up their pension payments, local governments and school districts are already cutting spending on police and fire protection and on classroom instruction.

California has another problem in the structure of its income tax. Half of the state income tax revenues are paid by just the 1% of top income earners in the state. That's fiscally sustainable in economic growth, which also helps reduce the strain on the pension systems. But, what happens when the stock market goes bearish, as it eventually must and will? The incomes of the top 1%, which rely heavily on investment returns, will naturally shrink and the pension systems will have less money in the till. The volatility of the incomes of the 1% and that of the pension funds makes it very difficult to plan budgets, which means running up debt in a state whose credit isn't much better than junk.

What would Newsom do about California's fiscal problems? According to him, "everything is on the table." But, everything is NOT on the table. Many California taxes require voter approval. For instance, most California voters want to repeal the latest increase in gasoline and auto registration taxes. California's high-speed rail project is now 77% above its original cost estimate. Newsom refuses to say whether he favors its completion or not. That isn't on the table.

What Newsom will do in office is heat the fiscal hot potato even hotter before he throws it to his successor.
0

#5 User is offline   Martin 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 7,594
  • Joined: 02-July 03

Posted 10 October 2018 - 08:10 AM

California is 40th in the nation in income inequality as measured by the Gini coefficient. That's almost identical to that of the next-most populous state, Texas. Yet, California is 4th in the nation in the increase in income inequality. (Source: Forbes Magazine). Unless that trend changes, California is going to act out leftists' biggest fear, a highly stratified society of haves and have-nots. The latter will naturally vote to tax the daylights out of the former. They are doing it already. They voted by approximately 2-1 to extend the "temporary" income tax increase on the top 1.5% of California taxpayers, which was due to expire in 2018. Newsom cannot oppose such a heavy majority of his constituents and a California governor cannot veto a citizen initiative, so that tax increase on his highest-paid constituents is NOT on the table no matter what Newsom says.

0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users