RightNation.US
News (Home) | Righters' Blog | Hollywood Halfwits | Our Store | New User Intro | Link to us | Support Us

RightNation.US: First ever sun-dimming experiment will mimic volcanic eruption - RightNation.US

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

First ever sun-dimming experiment will mimic volcanic eruption Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Gertie Keddle 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Platinum
  • Posts: 21,308
  • Joined: 12-August 03

Posted 06 December 2018 - 08:00 AM

First ever sun-dimming experiment will mimic volcanic eruption in attempt to reverse global warming

'If solar geoengineering is as good as what is shown in these models, it would be crazy not to take it seriously'

Josh Gabbatiss
The Independent (UK)
Excerpt:

Scientists plan to mimic the effects of a massive volcanic eruption in a bid to tackle global warming.

Plans to geoengineer the atmosphere by blocking out sunlight have been floated before, but an experiment launched next year by Harvard researchers will be the first to test the theory in the stratosphere.

The team will use a balloon suspended 12 miles above Earth to spray tiny chalk particles across a kilometre-long area, with the intention of reflecting the Sun’s rays away from the planet.

In doing so, they will attempt to replicate on a small scale the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines in 1991.

During this event, the volcano spewed 20 million tonnes of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere, creating a haze that cooled the planet by 0.5C for around 18 months – returning the Earth to its pre-industrial temperature.

The scientists argue that replicating this effect on a large scale could provide the planet with respite from global warming, stopping sea ice from melting and protecting coral from bleaching.

As efforts to tackle climate change appear ever more desperate, geoengineering has emerged as an increasingly appealing prospect – albeit a controversial one that has drawn criticism from scientists and environmentalists.

Some have suggested that solar geoengineering could have profound complications, for example wiping out crops, while others argue it distracts attention from cutting fossil fuel emissions.

However, team member and experimental physicist Professor David Keith said their analysis suggests ultimately the benefits of such attempts may well outweigh the negative impacts.

“Despite all of the concerns, we can’t find any areas that would be definitely worse off,” he told Nature.

“If solar geoengineering is as good as what is shown in these models, it would be crazy not to take it seriously.”

Either way, the scientists hope their Stratospheric Controlled Perturbation Experiment (Scopex) will shed some light on how effective such a strategy would be in reality.

After releasing the chalk dust, the motorised balloon would then re-enter the cloud and measure how it disperses in the air and affects the chemistry of the stratosphere.

The team are currently searching for the ideal location in the southwest US in which to conduct the experiment, which has been partly funded by Bill Gates of Microsoft.

Article
0

#2 User is offline   Gertie Keddle 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Platinum
  • Posts: 21,308
  • Joined: 12-August 03

Posted 06 December 2018 - 08:04 AM

just as reference:

Weather, Famine, Disease, Migration and Monsters: 1816-1819

by Chuck H.
he Historic Interpreter
Excerpt:



“We have had the most extraordinary year of drought and cold ever known in the history of America. In June, instead of 3 ¾ inches, our average of rain for that month, we only had ⅓ of an inch; in August, instead of 9 1/6 inches, our average, we had only 8/10 of an inch; and still it continues. The summer, too, has been as cold as a moderate winter. In every State north of this there has been frost in every month of the year; in this State we had none in June and July, but those of August killed much corn over the mountains. The crop of corn through the Atlantic States will probably be less than one-third of an ordinary one, that of tobacco still less, and of mean quality. The crop of wheat was middling in quantity, but excellent in quality. But every species of bread grain taken together will not be sufficient for the subsistence of the inhabitants, and the exportation of flour, already begun by the indebted and the improvident, to whatsoever degree it may be carried, will be exactly so much taken from the mouths of our own citizens. My anxieties on this subject are the greater, because I remember the deaths which the drought of 1755 in Virginia produced from the want of food.”


Thomas Jefferson writing to Albert Gallatin
September 8, 1816 (Jefferson, 1904-5)



1816 was known as ‘The Year Without a Summer’ or ‘Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death’ because of severe climate abnormalities that caused temperatures to decrease resulting in social, economic, and agricultural dislocations across the entire Northern Hemisphere. These unusual climatic abnormalities had the greatest effect on New England and the Mid-Atlantic states, Atlantic Canada, The United Kingdom, and large parts of Western Europe. The effects were also felt in parts of Asia.

Causes

Evidence suggests the anomaly was predominantly a volcanic winter event caused by the April 1815 eruption of Mount Tambora in the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia). Tambora is just one of many volcanoes in the archipelago of Indonesia and once was a mammoth peak – almost 14,000 feet high, believed to have been silent for 5,000 years before the explosion occurred. Then, in 1812, Tambora awoke from its slumber and small eruptions of steam and ash began to emanate from the mountain, accompanied by significant earth tremors. This continued until 5 April, 1815, when the first great eruption occurred, generating a volcanic column over 15 miles high. This blast was heard over 600 miles away. Five days later, on 10 April, a several colossal explosions occurred (heard almost 1600 miles away), creating columns of volcanic material that stretched up to 25 miles into the sky.

What goes up normally comes down, so when these columns collapsed, they formed pyroclastic flows – earth-hugging clouds of hot ash, rocks and pumice that rushed across the island killing almost the entire population of the Tambora province, over 10,000 people. In addition, when these flows reached the sea, they produced tsunamis up to 16 feet high. These crashed into neighboring islands across the archipelago, killing thousands more. The lighter ashes and dusts remained in the skies, turning day into night for days across an area hundreds of kilometers from the blast. When this ash finally fell back to earth, it blanketed the ground so completely that all vegetation died. The resulting famine and disease killed as many as 80,000 people across the islands in the region. All in all, the estimated death toll, as a direct result of the eruptions is between 90,000 and 117,000 – the largest death toll from a volcano in recorded history. (Evans, 2002) To put the size of this eruption in into perspective, using the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) where each whole number increase by a factor of 10, the Tambora eruption is thought to have been 100 times the size of the Mt St Helens eruption in the American Pacific Northwest which rated a 5! (United States Geological Survey, 2015)

Article


So of course doing this on purpose is a no brainer, amirite?
0

#3 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

  • <no title>
  • View gallery
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 34,114
  • Joined: 13-January 04

Posted 06 December 2018 - 08:07 AM

View Postarticle, on 06 December 2018 - 08:00 AM, said:

"Despite all of the concerns, we can't find any areas that would be definitely worse off," he told Nature.


The stupid is strong with this one.
0

#4 User is offline   LongKnife 

  • Don't start none, won't be none.
  • View gallery
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 3,849
  • Joined: 10-November 04

Posted 06 December 2018 - 08:32 AM

Quote

Scientists plan to mimic the effects of a massive volcanic eruption in a bid to tackle global warming.

You know somebody is receiving some massive research grants for this massive waste of time.

But if it will help justify slapping us with a massive carbon tax, the money will be considered well spent.
0

#5 User is online   Engineer Bill 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Community-Supported
  • Posts: 38
  • Joined: 02-November 04

Posted 06 December 2018 - 08:51 AM

Looks like a good law suit to me if farmers loose their any of their crops! Can we submit them a bill for the extra heating of our homes too!
0

#6 User is offline   Bubbajoebob 

  • M dwarf stars
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 534
  • Joined: 28-July 09

Posted 06 December 2018 - 09:29 AM

This is lots scarier than global warming. Yeah, if all the global warmist projections are true it'll be harder to farm in some areas. If global cooling goes crazy and we re-start the ice age we're currently in (yes, we're now in a "short" inter-glacial period during an ice age) most of us are in trouble. Most of North America was under more than a mile of ice. Try farming that.
0

#7 User is offline   MontyPython 

  • Pull My Finger.....
  • View gallery
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 53,551
  • Joined: 28-February 03

Posted 06 December 2018 - 09:49 AM

What could possibly go wrong?

:pinch:
0

#8 User is offline   Censport 

  • @CensportRacing
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 15,708
  • Joined: 13-August 03

Posted 06 December 2018 - 11:37 AM

"Some of the biggest cases of mistaken identity are among intellectuals who have trouble remembering that they are not God."

- Thomas Sowell, 2007

0

#9 User is offline   oki 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 23,902
  • Joined: 14-October 04

Posted 06 December 2018 - 11:45 AM

Aaah hell, they don't need to mimic a Volcanic Eruption for the experiment, just buy me lunch and wait about 20 minutes.

Oki
0

#10 User is online   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

  • Pissing off all of the right people
  • Group: Silver
  • Posts: 28,443
  • Joined: 14-October 03

Posted 06 December 2018 - 12:10 PM

They've already been doing this (chemtrails) for over 20 years.
0

#11 User is offline   Censport 

  • @CensportRacing
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 15,708
  • Joined: 13-August 03

Posted 06 December 2018 - 12:19 PM

View Postoki, on 06 December 2018 - 11:45 AM, said:

Aaah hell, they don't need to mimic a Volcanic Eruption for the experiment, just buy me lunch and wait about 20 minutes.

Oki

I'm glad I'm upwind of you.
0

#12 User is offline   oki 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 23,902
  • Joined: 14-October 04

Posted 06 December 2018 - 12:58 PM

View PostCensport, on 06 December 2018 - 12:19 PM, said:

I'm glad I'm upwind of you.



That may help escape the 'fragrance' but not the shock wave.
:nanner:

Oki
0

#13 User is offline   Censport 

  • @CensportRacing
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 15,708
  • Joined: 13-August 03

Posted 06 December 2018 - 01:33 PM

View Postoki, on 06 December 2018 - 12:58 PM, said:

That may help escape the 'fragrance' but not the shock wave.
:nanner:

Oki

I heard that.
0

#14 User is online   Dean Adam Smithee 

  • School of the Cold Hard Facts
  • View gallery
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 19,555
  • Joined: 11-December 04

Posted 06 December 2018 - 02:18 PM

View PostGertie Keddle, on 06 December 2018 - 08:00 AM, said:

Scientists plan to mimic the effects of a massive volcanic eruption in a bid to tackle global warming.


Or, they could just wait for the next Volcano. Like the one in Iceland several years back that was massive enough to disrupt air travel all over Europe.

The Week (UK): The volcanoes likely to erupt next

Sounds to me like someone is just trying to fleece the taxpayers out of grant money.
0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users