RightNation.US
News (Home) | Righters' Blog | Hollywood Halfwits | Our Store | New User Intro | Link to us | Support Us

RightNation.US: A Swamp Divided: How Trump's Arrival Turned D.C. Nightlife Upside - RightNation.US

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

A Swamp Divided: How Trump's Arrival Turned D.C. Nightlife Upside "Trump doesn’t need to build a wall; he’s built one here.” Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Censport 

  • Twitter: @CensportRacing
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 16,095
  • Joined: 13-August 03

Posted 08 February 2019 - 09:33 AM

A Swamp Divided: How Trump's Arrival Turned D.C. Nightlife Upside Down
"Trump doesn’t need to build a wall; he’s built one here.”
Esquire.com
Ryan Lizza Feb 7, 2019


Washington is one of the only places in America where an election transforms the city’s social life. Plenty of people live here with no regard for who occupies the White House, but a lot of social networks get rewired when a new president comes to town and brings along thousands of ideological kin. In the Kennedy and Johnson eras, official Washington took its cues from the White House: Glamorous dinner parties were in vogue under JFK, followed by more down-home barbecues under LBJ. No matter the president, though, guest lists tended to span both parties, and the fraternizing helped keep the government’s gears and levers well-enough oiled.

But in the Reagan-Bush eighties, social life in D. C., just as in the rest of the country, began to polarize, with the newly empowered conservatives who arrived with Ronald Reagan making a show of shunning D. C.’s establishment (though Nancy still loved entertaining her Hollywood friends at the White House). A pattern set in: Democratic presidents and their aides were quick to mingle with the city’s mostly liberal establishment, and Republicans were isolated from it. But even though George W. Bush was in bed before 10:00 p.m., and despite the culture clash experienced by his Texas clan, members of his administration were not pariahs. He and Nancy Pelosi, who became Speaker of the House during his second term, had a surprisingly good relationship, one nourished by White House social events that helped prevent a total breakdown in governing. It was an echo of the now-legendary comity between Reagan and Tip O’Neill, who sometimes hashed out legislative differences over whiskey.

The Trump era is different. Washington feels more like occupied territory, and every social interaction is fraught with ideological and even moral questions about whether it is appropriate to mingle with people who defend the indefensible: lying, attacking reporters as enemies of the people, putting children in cages, assisting in the cover-up of the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. Take Juleanna Glover, one of the city’s most well-known hostesses. Her home has become a sort of oasis where the list is scrupulously scrubbed of most Trump guests. And Glover is no left-winger; she worked for John Ashcroft and Dick Cheney. Indeed, her parties these days are often the center of D. C.’s #NeverTrump conservative resistance, as was the case at a book party she threw for Rick Wilson, the Republican consultant who recently published the best seller Everything Trump Touches Dies. “We can call them the uncontaminated,” Glover joked. “Pulling together the like-minded makes people hopeful. You’re aggregating the intellectually disciplined and principled. But it’s also deeply siloing.”

Sally Quinn, the author and Washington Post journalist who is still the city’s most famous dinner-party hostess and a historian of D. C.’s elite social life, is another who has taken a stand. “Someone asked me, ‘Would you ever invite the Trumps to your house?’ The fact is I couldn’t,” she said. “It would be embracing everything I’m against. And I haven’t been to an actual dinner party in two years where any of the Trump officials are. Trump doesn’t need to build a wall; he’s built one here.”

When other prominent hosts have welcomed senior Trump officials to their table, there has sometimes been a backlash. David Bradley, chairman of Atlantic Media, which co-owns The Atlantic, hosts a steady stream of D. C. soirees for the powerful. He was met with criticism when Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump showed up at a dinner he was hosting during the White House Correspondents’ Association weekend last spring. Bradley believes introducing journalists to politicians and officials is an important part of his job but concedes there is a “moral dimension” when including “controversial, even offensive” guests. “There is a wide spectrum of views in Washington on this issue, especially in this hour,” he told me. “I am sympathetic to the reasoning on both sides—the purist and the accommodationist. In general, I think humanity would fare better with a larger mix of humility and a sparer dose of righteousness. I think that’s still true in today’s Washington, but it’s a closer call.”

Not everyone associated with the administration is unwelcome. D. C. hosts have developed a sliding scale of tolerance. One hostess put it this way: “My benchmark is, Are they credentialed? Would they be a candidate for a senior position in any other White House?” (The former secretary of defense Jim Mattis, a retired Marine Corps general, is a prominent example of someone in that category.) But this hostess also noted that some officials who initially pass that test might also come to be seen as toxic. “John Kelly’s hall pass back into acceptable society was revoked when he promoted the idea of separating kids from their families,” she said. “He is the godfather of that policy, and everyone knows it.”

Meanwhile, the widely attended major events that once lubricated relations between various strata of official D. C.—Congress, the press, the White House, the ambassadorial class, the lobbying world—have been blown up by the Trumps. Two of the biggest annual nights in Washington, the White House Correspondents’ dinner and the Kennedy Center Honors, revolve around the president’s participation. In 2017, several reporters (I was one of them) publicly suggested that it wasn’t appropriate to toast a president who was vilifying us. Trump preemptively responded to the nascent revolt by announcing he wouldn’t come anyway. The same year, when some Kennedy honorees said they would boycott a White House reception, Trump canceled the event and refused to attend the gala at the Kennedy Center. Both weekends are now much more low-key affairs. In December, Trump called off the annual White House holiday party for the press. Fox News, which broke the story, pointed out that even Bill Clinton had hosted the event and posed for endless pictures just days after he was impeached in 1998.


Much, much more here.
0

#2 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

  • School of the Cold Hard Facts
  • View gallery
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 20,448
  • Joined: 11-December 04

Posted 08 February 2019 - 09:46 AM

View PostCensport, on 08 February 2019 - 09:33 AM, said:

Sally Quinn, the author and Washington Post journalist who is still the city’s most famous dinner-party hostess and a historian of D. C.’s elite social life, is another who has taken a stand. “Someone asked me, ‘Would you ever invite the Trumps to your house?’ The fact is I couldn’t,” she said. “It would be embracing everything I’m against. And I haven’t been to an actual dinner party in two years where any of the Trump officials are. Trump doesn’t need to build a wall; he’s built one here.”


Here's a clue for Ms. Quinn: It's not Trump who erected that wall.
0

#3 User is offline   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

  • Pissing off all of the right people
  • Group: Silver
  • Posts: 30,038
  • Joined: 14-October 03

Posted 08 February 2019 - 09:48 AM

Awww.

Whatsamatta?

The "party of tolerance" proggy snowflakes can't stand to have any pro-Trumpers anywhere near them so they want to melt down and have a conniption fit and go home? :comfort:



BWAHAHAHAHA!
:sinister:

Better get used to it, bitches! :D
0

#4 User is offline   RedSoloCup 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 4,848
  • Joined: 05-June 15

Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:06 AM

View PostRock N, on 08 February 2019 - 09:48 AM, said:

Awww.

Whatsamatta?

The "party of tolerance" proggy snowflakes can't stand to have any pro-Trumpers anywhere near them so they want to melt down and have a conniption fit and go home? :comfort:



BWAHAHAHAHA!
:sinister:

Better get used to it, bitches! :D


:exactly:
0

#5 User is offline   MontyPython 

  • Pull My Finger.....
  • View gallery
  • Group: Gold
  • Posts: 56,173
  • Joined: 28-February 03

Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:19 AM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 08 February 2019 - 09:46 AM, said:

Here's a clue for Ms. Quinn: It's not Trump who erected that wall.


Exactly.

B)
0

#6 User is offline   USMCforever60 

  • <no title>
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 749
  • Joined: 02-November 04

Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:39 AM

View PostCensport, on 08 February 2019 - 09:33 AM, said:

A Swamp Divided: How Trump's Arrival Turned D.C. Nightlife Upside Down
"Trump doesn’t need to build a wall; he’s built one here.”
Esquire.com
Ryan Lizza Feb 7, 2019


Washington is one of the only places in America where an election transforms the city’s social life. Plenty of people live here with no regard for who occupies the White House, but a lot of social networks get rewired when a new president comes to town and brings along thousands of ideological kin. In the Kennedy and Johnson eras, official Washington took its cues from the White House: Glamorous dinner parties were in vogue under JFK, followed by more down-home barbecues under LBJ. No matter the president, though, guest lists tended to span both parties, and the fraternizing helped keep the government’s gears and levers well-enough oiled.

But in the Reagan-Bush eighties, social life in D. C., just as in the rest of the country, began to polarize, with the newly empowered conservatives who arrived with Ronald Reagan making a show of shunning D. C.’s establishment (though Nancy still loved entertaining her Hollywood friends at the White House). A pattern set in: Democratic presidents and their aides were quick to mingle with the city’s mostly liberal establishment, and Republicans were isolated from it. But even though George W. Bush was in bed before 10:00 p.m., and despite the culture clash experienced by his Texas clan, members of his administration were not pariahs. He and Nancy Pelosi, who became Speaker of the House during his second term, had a surprisingly good relationship, one nourished by White House social events that helped prevent a total breakdown in governing. It was an echo of the now-legendary comity between Reagan and Tip O’Neill, who sometimes hashed out legislative differences over whiskey.

The Trump era is different. Washington feels more like occupied territory, and every social interaction is fraught with ideological and even moral questions about whether it is appropriate to mingle with people who defend the indefensible: lying, attacking reporters as enemies of the people, putting children in cages, assisting in the cover-up of the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. Take Juleanna Glover, one of the city’s most well-known hostesses. Her home has become a sort of oasis where the list is scrupulously scrubbed of most Trump guests. And Glover is no left-winger; she worked for John Ashcroft and Dick Cheney. Indeed, her parties these days are often the center of D. C.’s #NeverTrump conservative resistance, as was the case at a book party she threw for Rick Wilson, the Republican consultant who recently published the best seller Everything Trump Touches Dies. “We can call them the uncontaminated,” Glover joked. “Pulling together the like-minded makes people hopeful. You’re aggregating the intellectually disciplined and principled. But it’s also deeply siloing.”

Sally Quinn, the author and Washington Post journalist who is still the city’s most famous dinner-party hostess and a historian of D. C.’s elite social life, is another who has taken a stand. “Someone asked me, ‘Would you ever invite the Trumps to your house?’ The fact is I couldn’t,” she said. “It would be embracing everything I’m against. And I haven’t been to an actual dinner party in two years where any of the Trump officials are. Trump doesn’t need to build a wall; he’s built one here.”

When other prominent hosts have welcomed senior Trump officials to their table, there has sometimes been a backlash. David Bradley, chairman of Atlantic Media, which co-owns The Atlantic, hosts a steady stream of D. C. soirees for the powerful. He was met with criticism when Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump showed up at a dinner he was hosting during the White House Correspondents’ Association weekend last spring. Bradley believes introducing journalists to politicians and officials is an important part of his job but concedes there is a “moral dimension” when including “controversial, even offensive” guests. “There is a wide spectrum of views in Washington on this issue, especially in this hour,” he told me. “I am sympathetic to the reasoning on both sides—the purist and the accommodationist. In general, I think humanity would fare better with a larger mix of humility and a sparer dose of righteousness. I think that’s still true in today’s Washington, but it’s a closer call.”

Not everyone associated with the administration is unwelcome. D. C. hosts have developed a sliding scale of tolerance. One hostess put it this way: “My benchmark is, Are they credentialed? Would they be a candidate for a senior position in any other White House?” (The former secretary of defense Jim Mattis, a retired Marine Corps general, is a prominent example of someone in that category.) But this hostess also noted that some officials who initially pass that test might also come to be seen as toxic. “John Kelly’s hall pass back into acceptable society was revoked when he promoted the idea of separating kids from their families,” she said. “He is the godfather of that policy, and everyone knows it.”

Meanwhile, the widely attended major events that once lubricated relations between various strata of official D. C.—Congress, the press, the White House, the ambassadorial class, the lobbying world—have been blown up by the Trumps. Two of the biggest annual nights in Washington, the White House Correspondents’ dinner and the Kennedy Center Honors, revolve around the president’s participation. In 2017, several reporters (I was one of them) publicly suggested that it wasn’t appropriate to toast a president who was vilifying us. Trump preemptively responded to the nascent revolt by announcing he wouldn’t come anyway. The same year, when some Kennedy honorees said they would boycott a White House reception, Trump canceled the event and refused to attend the gala at the Kennedy Center. Both weekends are now much more low-key affairs. In December, Trump called off the annual White House holiday party for the press. Fox News, which broke the story, pointed out that even Bill Clinton had hosted the event and posed for endless pictures just days after he was impeached in 1998.


Much, much more here.

Meh, I call horse crap on the comment that former Pres Reagan and that fat slob Tipp hashed out differences over whiskey. Tipp was fat slob drunk that despised Former Pres. Reagan. I know, not everyone would believe it but there are some things that never get discussed. Samething during W. tenure, Pelosi and W. were on the same side, so the mere mention they were friends is a lie. W and Pelosi are part of the problem!
0

#7 User is offline   Natural Selection 

  • Decrypt the truth
  • Group: Bronze
  • Posts: 17,830
  • Joined: 31-December 03

Posted 08 February 2019 - 11:48 AM

View PostCensport, on 08 February 2019 - 09:33 AM, said:

The Trump era is different. Washington feels more like occupied territory


One more reason to feel good about my vote for Trump.
0

#8 User is offline   BootsieBets 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 522
  • Joined: 13-August 18

Posted 08 February 2019 - 12:00 PM

View PostDean Adam Smithee, on 08 February 2019 - 09:46 AM, said:

Here's a clue for Ms. Quinn: It's not Trump who erected that wall.

How very short their memories are. There are reams of stories on the people who, not so long ago, praised Donald Trump for his work in charities, his civil rights efforts, what a great man he was – until he made the cardinal sin of switching parties and running as a republican against the heiress apparent, Hillary Clinton. He stole what was rightfully hers and in doing so, he also put a stop to the unimpeded progression of the democrats dream of total control. So, they hate him for that now and that’s what blew a hole in their little world of politics as usual. Which included all the “bipartisan” dinners and cocktail parties where they were able to stand around and talk and laugh and feel superior to us proletariat.
0

#9 User is offline   Joe the Pagan 

  • I'm a Whovian not a Dweeb
  • View blog
  • Group: Platinum Community Supporter
  • Posts: 6,644
  • Joined: 02-November 03

Posted 08 February 2019 - 01:45 PM

View PostUSMCforever60, on 08 February 2019 - 10:39 AM, said:

Meh, I call horse crap on the comment that former Pres Reagan and that fat slob Tipp hashed out differences over whiskey. Tipp was fat slob drunk that despised Former Pres. Reagan. I know, not everyone would believe it but there are some things that never get discussed. Samething during W. tenure, Pelosi and W. were on the same side, so the mere mention they were friends is a lie. W and Pelosi are part of the problem!


Give it twenty to thirty years. The leftists will rewrite history to bash the current Republicans. They will demand they act more like that nice bipartisan President Trump.
0

#10 User is offline   zurg 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 27,167
  • Joined: 19-October 09

Posted 08 February 2019 - 01:45 PM

They STILL don’t understand WHY Trump was elected. (Hint - look in the mirror, douchebags.)
0

#11 User is offline   zurg 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 27,167
  • Joined: 19-October 09

Posted 08 February 2019 - 01:55 PM

View PostBootsieBets, on 08 February 2019 - 12:00 PM, said:

How very short their memories are. There are reams of stories on the people who, not so long ago, praised Donald Trump for his work in charities, his civil rights efforts, what a great man he was – until he made the cardinal sin of switching parties and running as a republican against the heiress apparent, Hillary Clinton. He stole what was rightfully hers and in doing so, he also put a stop to the unimpeded progression of the democrats dream of total control. So, they hate him for that now and that’s what blew a hole in their little world of politics as usual. Which included all the “bipartisan” dinners and cocktail parties where they were able to stand around and talk and laugh and feel superior to us proletariat.

Exactly.
0

#12 User is offline   Howsithangin 

  • It's OK To Be White
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 26,976
  • Joined: 07-March 08

Posted 08 February 2019 - 05:45 PM

View PostNatural Selection, on 08 February 2019 - 11:48 AM, said:

One more reason to feel good about my vote for Trump.

Precisely what I was thinking.

I for one like DC to be uneasy and less of s Upper East Side social event. Make them worried for their jobs.
0

#13 User is offline   Severian 

  • Order of the Seekers for Truth & Penitence
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 13,832
  • Joined: 14-February 04

Posted 08 February 2019 - 06:30 PM

The tone of this whole article and the description of DC social life reminds me of of the Hunger Games books and their description of life in the Capitol vs. life in the districts.
0

#14 User is online   gravelrash 

  • I wish they all were punk rock girls
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 14,757
  • Joined: 24-June 03

Posted 08 February 2019 - 06:58 PM

View PostSeverian, on 08 February 2019 - 06:30 PM, said:

The tone of this whole article and the description of DC social life reminds me of of the Hunger Games books and their description of life in the Capitol vs. life in the districts.


Off topic, but I saw the movies, never read the books. The end of Mockingjay Part II was a gut-punch. So the novels are that good?

Anyway, on another site, someone suggested that Hunger Games and Maze Runner are part of the same literary world. PM me if you're interested.
0

#15 User is offline   Severian 

  • Order of the Seekers for Truth & Penitence
  • Group: +Gold Community Supporter
  • Posts: 13,832
  • Joined: 14-February 04

Posted 08 February 2019 - 07:12 PM

View Postgravelrash, on 08 February 2019 - 06:58 PM, said:

Off topic, but I saw the movies, never read the books. The end of Mockingjay Part II was a gut-punch. So the novels are that good?

Anyway, on another site, someone suggested that Hunger Games and Maze Runner are part of the same literary world. PM me if you're interested.

I can believe they're related, both have a distinct dystopian tone. I saw the first Maze Runner movie, was kind of intriguing but not enough for me to read the books.

The Hunger Game books are of course better than the movies, and they are more different as the movies go along, the last book and movie, while mostly the same, diverge a lot, the book is much more complicated. Overall I enjoyed the books, I kind of call it "1984" for teens. Like most series the final book is not as good as the first but I still enjoyed them and the complexity and depth of descriptions are more detailed than the movies of course.

But the whole DC as the Capitol still gets to me. I remember when the Left was saying that the Hunger Games was really a left leaning book because of, get this, income inequality.
0

#16 User is offline   Bookdoc 

  • Daddy's little girl
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 5,052
  • Joined: 07-September 05

Posted 08 February 2019 - 08:23 PM

I have a feeling President Trump could give less than a rat's a$$ about how DC socialites feel about him. He's President, a billionaire, has a supermodel wife and a great family, and is working all the time. As a non-drinker, he probably isn't interested in the cocktail party circuit unless there's a good reason for him to be there. Give me a man who works hard as President and lets the lesser people party on without him and I am happy. MAGA!
0

#17 User is offline   Censport 

  • Twitter: @CensportRacing
  • Group: +Bronze Community Supporter
  • Posts: 16,095
  • Joined: 13-August 03

Posted 09 February 2019 - 12:39 AM

I have absolutely no sympathy for Ryan Lizza and his social circle. They were partying it up with the Obamas while America was getting laid off, going on welfare, filing for bankruptcy, selling off belongings, and working whatever part-time jobs they could find. They want the Trump administration to go away so they can Make DC's Social Scene Great Again... regardless of the cost to the average American in flyover country. Well I for one hope more of these establishment hacks lose their jobs and standard of living, and learn what life has been like for the rest of us.
0

#18 User is offline   zurg 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 27,167
  • Joined: 19-October 09

Posted 09 February 2019 - 07:13 AM

View PostCensport, on 09 February 2019 - 12:39 AM, said:

I have absolutely no sympathy for Ryan Lizza and his social circle. They were partying it up with the Obamas while America was getting laid off, going on welfare, filing for bankruptcy, selling off belongings, and working whatever part-time jobs they could find. They want the Trump administration to go away so they can Make DC's Social Scene Great Again... regardless of the cost to the average American in flyover country. Well I for one hope more of these establishment hacks lose their jobs and standard of living, and learn what life has been like for the rest of us.

:thumbsup:
0

#19 User is offline   RedSoloCup 

  • <no title>
  • Group: +Copper Community Supporter
  • Posts: 4,848
  • Joined: 05-June 15

Posted 09 February 2019 - 07:54 AM

Never regret my vote for Trump!
0

#20 User is offline   USNRETWIFE 

  • Tiki Barbie
  • Group: +Silver Community Supporter
  • Posts: 15,337
  • Joined: 02-April 03

Posted 09 February 2019 - 10:11 AM

What drivel. I couldn't get through the whole article. But it did make me wonder how many low income people this Sally Quinn, whoever she is, has at her famous dinner parties. Or is it just rhetoric the left likes, and not the reality? LOL! It's okay to talk about them and champion them, but best not mingle!
0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users