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#1 User is offline   Martin 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 09:09 AM

The Radical Way Berlin Plans To Solve Its Housing Crisis

https://www.huffpost...4b0308735d59712

Thousands of people took to the streets in Germanyís capital city on Saturday to protest the rapidly rising cost of apartments in Berlin. ďThere were old people, young people, families, there were even homeowners Ö it was basically a snapshot of the entire population of Berlin,Ē said 77-year-old Barbara von Boroviczťny, one of the activists involved in organizing the protest as part of grassroots campaign group Expropriate Deutsche Wohnen & Co. But things are changing. In the last 10 years alone, monthly rents have more than doubled. And there is no end in sight, with population growth expected to continue in the coming years: Berlin, currently home to 3.7 million people, is projected to pass the 4 million mark by 2025. But, unlike many other cities, Berlinís politicians, residents and activists are pitching radical ideas to try to address the housing crisis, including a ban on mega-landlords and a rental freeze.

Big ideas to address Berlinís housing woes arenít just coming from activists. As the idea of scaling back the power of mega-landlords continues to be debated, the city of Berlin is buying up apartments in the hopes of selling them to local housing associations. The city government has bought more than 1,100 apartments since 2015 and is negotiating to purchase approximately 2,600 more. The radical plans being debated in the city are not without their critics. One barrier to banning mega-landlords is the potential expense. The policy could cost the city up to $40.5 billion (36 billion euros), according to Berlinís government, a staggering figure for a city already plagued by debt.But public support for these measures is high. Two-thirds of city residents would support the five-year rental freeze, according to recent polling. The proposal to break up large rental companies has also received support, with 44 percent of Berliners supporting the idea versus 39 percent opposing the plan, according to one survey.

Berlin also has an exceptionally high proportion of residents who rent their homes or apartments (approximately 85 percent) unlike the U.S., where there is a stronger trend toward home ownership.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
In the Poli Sci class, the class is discussing the principle that when 85% of the voters are tenants and rents have doubled in the past ten years, there is a strong constituency for rent control. Meanwhile, over in Economics 101, the class is discussing the principle that when you limit the price on any product or service, you create a shortage. Who would build new housing in Berlin when that is unprofitable?

The name of the organization "Expropriate Deutsche Wohnen", is accurate. They want to expropriate the 200,000 apartments in Berlin which are owned by corporate landlords under Article 15 of the federal constitution:


After World War II, legislators of all political factions believed economic monopolies to be dangerous for democracy. Indeed, several German industry giants had willingly cooperated with the Nazi state. Article 15 of the German constitution was designed as a tool to prevent what legal experts called a ďmisuse of economic power against societyĒ.

Yet, if you build apartments in Berlin and you run the risk of having the government seize them and pay you a below-market price for them, why would you build any? Hadn't you better invest your money elsewhere? The expropriation would have the same effect as the rent control, to restrict new supply of what is already insufficient to meet demand.

Given that the vacancy rate in Berlin is only 1-2%, how do you get into one of those rent-controlled apartments which has been seized by the city housing department? The Europeans I have met would likely answer, "You have to know somebody." "Somebody", that is, who has the power to grant or withhold favors like sending you to the front of the queue. The expropriation which the housing radicals want would replace the power the landlords hold over them with the power the city housing department holds over them, replacing the aristocracy of ownership with the aristocracy of pull.
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#2 User is offline   Wag-a-Muffin (D) 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 10:01 AM

When I read this, I thought of Obamacare. Who would think that if you gave more people health care without creating more doctors, nurses, or health care facilities or workers, that you could get a better result.

(Actually, so many medical workers quit after the implementation that there were less places to receive care than before the bill was passed. And what student wanted to amass the HUGE student debt that medical school demands if after you become a doctor you are bound by red tape?)

If you don't create a less risky atmosphere for the builders of apartments--how are you going to get more apartments built?

I will still never understand leftists--we want the government out of our lives, but we want a BIGGER, more intrusive government at the same time.
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#3 User is offline   Natural Selection 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 10:06 AM

My guess is that a lot of the affordable housing is being taken up by the recent surge of unskilled immigrants.

Another unintended consequence of the left's "compassion" towards non-citizens at the expense of citizens.
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#4 User is offline   Timothy 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 11:31 AM

This has a lot to do with it: https://www.dw.com/e...-end/a-42099953

In general I agree with the econ101 argument: The principal way to deal with this is to build a lot more housing.

On a related note, there could be some interesting changes in the future to housing construction, like 3D printing. https://all3dp.com/2...ted-house-cost/
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#5 User is offline   Natural Selection 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 12:05 PM

View PostTimothy, on 12 April 2019 - 11:31 AM, said:

In general I agree with the econ101 argument: The principal way to deal with this is to build a lot more housing.


Or reduce unskilled immigration.
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#6 User is offline   Noclevermoniker 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 01:46 PM

Heck, from the title I thought it was going to be an article about housing leftist radicals in insane asylums.
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#7 User is offline   zurg 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 01:59 PM

The problem with the Timothys of the world (including apparently the German versions of the same) is that they have so much faith in the proven-bad socialism and so little faith in the proven-good free market capitalism.

How would free markets solve this? Markets would exist for housing options for lower income people with reasonable access to the city. Some infrastructure would be built (at a fraction of the cost of the socialist plan proposed in the article) and the problem would be solved.

Thereís really nothing more to it.

This post has been edited by zurg: 12 April 2019 - 01:59 PM

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#8 User is offline   tailgunner 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 04:48 PM



Worked in Doctor Zhivago. I'am sure timothy would give it a big thumbs up! As long it's not mom and dad's house.
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#9 User is offline   Squirrel 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 05:16 PM

I was in Berlin before the wall fell and after until they deactivated the armor battalion there. The yr after the wall fell was an eye opening change and a great example of opening your borders to a poor country and offering benifits. Look up pictures of the city and subways and streets and parks pre 1989 then look at pictures of those same things 2-3 yrs later. It was the cleanest city and place Iíve ever lived in prior to the wall falling. There was no graffiti the streets were cleaned and swept and the parks were spotless. See they made sure everyone had housing, food a job etc. How... well you got a goverment check you worked for it, if your only skill was pushing a broom you got a broom and orange jumpsuit to sweep the streets. You were a woman with a kid and couldnít work, well here are 6 other kids to watch so thier moms can work. It was a standing joke if we go to war Iím just grabbing an orange jump suit and broom. But the point is even with their welfare state it had work ethics. You donít work you donít get your check. Then look at pictures of the city 2 yrs after the wall fell or now. Itís just anouther case of house me, feed me, I shouldnít have to work. The graffiti and crime showed up 7 months after the wall fell. You canít house and feed the lazy that wonít help themselves in any country. Free breeds lazy

This post has been edited by Squirrel: 12 April 2019 - 05:19 PM

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#10 User is offline   Timothy 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 05:59 PM

View PostNatural Selection, on 12 April 2019 - 12:05 PM, said:

Or reduce unskilled immigration.

Or train those immigrants in the required skills.

View Postzurg, on 12 April 2019 - 01:59 PM, said:

The problem with the Timothys of the world (including apparently the German versions of the same) is that they have so much faith in the proven-bad socialism and so little faith in the proven-good free market capitalism.

I literally said "The principal way to deal with this is to build a lot more housing."
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#11 User is offline   zurg 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 06:02 PM

View PostTimothy, on 12 April 2019 - 05:59 PM, said:

Or train those immigrants in the required skills.


I literally said "The principal way to deal with this is to build a lot more housing."

So? You didnít say, ďlet the private market have freedom to get permits to build to meet demandĒ. Last time I checked you were still a socialist - if that has changed, kudos!
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#12 User is offline   Bookdoc 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 06:12 PM

View PostTimothy, on 12 April 2019 - 05:59 PM, said:

Or train those immigrants in the required skills.


I literally said "The principal way to deal with this is to build a lot more housing."

A little basic economics. If government regulations make it very difficult to profit by building, why build? The capital would be better used in a profitable enterprise.
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#13 User is offline   Squirrel 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 06:14 PM

So how much is housing feeding and training these unskilled immigrants going to cost Timothy? How do you think that will be paid for? Iím sure you have a plan. Then will there be any issue with newly trained workers who also donít fully speak the language putting up buildings, following code and plans? How do you address that? Does Germany owe them anything or why? Letís have a conversation. Thatís a start can you answer those questions?
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#14 User is offline   Howsithangin 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 06:56 PM

So by all means keep importing millions of third world leeches
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#15 User is offline   Howsithangin 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 06:59 PM

View PostTimothy, on 12 April 2019 - 05:59 PM, said:

Or train those immigrants in the required skills.


Thatís so cute. 😙

You really believe that: 1. They will work; and 2. Itís economically affordable, donít you?

Ah, the
Mind of a child; itís all so simple

This post has been edited by Howsithangin: 12 April 2019 - 07:00 PM

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#16 User is offline   Squirrel 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 07:03 PM

Parasites donít produce. I know Iím going to catch <censored> for this comparison but itís true and itís about charecter not race. If you look at 60ís Iran and Iran today, then look at gulf states, gulf states to day or South Africa before or now and venisqualia parisites lock on destroy and move on. Look at America, Detroit, California, New York destroy move on then start destroying again. Socialism is a disease, destroy the host, find a new home and destroy that. Itís not hard to see or anything Ben to notice. Itís just speeding up because they have bled thier states and countries dry.
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#17 User is offline   Natural Selection 

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 12:06 AM

View PostTimothy, on 12 April 2019 - 05:59 PM, said:

Or train those immigrants in the required skills.


After we train the American citizens first.
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#18 User is offline   Joe the Pagan 

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 11:53 AM

View PostHowsithangin, on 12 April 2019 - 06:59 PM, said:

View PostTimothy, on 12 April 2019 - 05:59 PM, said:

Or train those immigrants in the required skills.

Thatís so cute. 😙

You really believe that: 1. They will work; and 2. Itís economically affordable, donít you?

Ah, the
Mind of a child; itís all so simple


3. How many of the immigrants economic migrants are expecting to go from skill less goat herder to president and CEO of a multinational corporation in one easy step.

Years ago one of my sisters was in a job program for unwed mothers. They program had more participants than available seats. The instructor explained to the people who had to stand that in two weeks there would be plenty of seats. People would leave because they will not want to do the work requited or quit. Most people quit when they realized they were getting training and placement in entry level jobs, an not some high level executive.

A few weeks ago I was listing to the radio. The guest on the show was Boston politician, who wanted a 13th grade for students wanting to get to college, but were not ready. The politician believed that corporations in Boston should help fund his program. They would benefiting from a larger pool of possible minority employees.

Listening to the politician I realized he believed you could go from unskilled to high level executive in one easy step.
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#19 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 12:14 PM

View PostJoe the Pagan, on 13 April 2019 - 11:53 AM, said:

3. How many of the immigrants economic migrants are expecting to go from skill less goat herder to president and CEO of a multinational corporation in one easy step.

Years ago one of my sisters was in a job program for unwed mothers. They program had more participants than available seats. The instructor explained to the people who had to stand that in two weeks there would be plenty of seats. People would leave because they will not want to do the work requited or quit. Most people quit when they realized they were getting training and placement in entry level jobs, an not some high level executive.

A few weeks ago I was listing to the radio. The guest on the show was Boston politician, who wanted a 13th grade for students wanting to get to college, but were not ready. The politician believed that corporations in Boston should help fund his program. They would benefiting from a larger pool of possible minority employees.

Listening to the politician I realized he believed you could go from unskilled to high level executive in one easy step.


Very well said Joe. Before I destroyed my back in a motorcycle wreck, I was a quality-control final-acceptance inspector for an aeronautical-parts company that made products for Lockheed, Cessna, Boeing, Airbus, McDonnell-Douglas, and pretty much every other major firm, including NASA. (There are parts my company produced on the moon right now.) But when I started there? I was sweeping floors. Then I "moved up" to loading trucks. Then I "moved up" to assistant-this and assistant-that. You get the general idea. After a few years there I had learned enough to become an inspector. I didn't think I was good enough to be an inspector the very first day I was there.

B)
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#20 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 01:05 PM

View PostMontyPython, on 13 April 2019 - 12:14 PM, said:

Very well said Joe. Before I destroyed my back in a motorcycle wreck, I was a quality-control final-acceptance inspector for an aeronautical-parts company that made products for Lockheed, Cessna, Boeing, Airbus, McDonnell-Douglas, and pretty much every other major firm, including NASA. (There are parts my company produced on the moon right now.) But when I started there? I was sweeping floors. Then I "moved up" to loading trucks. Then I "moved up" to assistant-this and assistant-that. You get the general idea. After a few years there I had learned enough to become an inspector. I didn't think I was good enough to be an inspector the very first day I was there.

B)

Reminds me of one of the best electrical engineers I worked with, black guy, got training in electronics in the Air Force. Left thee AF, started where I worked (big Aerospace company) as an electronics tech, was the only non-degreed person I ever met who had a full engineer title and such at my company. But he deserved it, hard worker, who knew his stuff, absolutely invaluable in the lab especially, he had the kind of hands on knowledge you needed. You don't want a desk and book knowledge only guy when you're tearing apart missile seekers to diagnose problems, fix them, and retest them. He really understood the systems.

Also, one of my best friends was a heavy equipment/generator repair guy. He now holds a full engineer position at a medical equipment company, no degree.

Both were smart, hard workers, and learned quickly. Did not start at the top or expected things to be handed to them.
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