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#1 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 08:04 AM

The sun has 'reached solar minimum' and its surface is ominously calm
Jasper Hamill
Tuesday 4 Jun 2019
Metro.CO.UK

<More Disaster Here>

https://i0.wp.com/metro.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Screenshot-2019-06-04-at-14.33.58-cd95.png


This recent Nasa image shows the face of the sun looking blanker than usual.

The surface of the sun is normally a roiling, super-heated hellscape. But Nasa images have revealed that the face of our star is looking ominously calm right now, prompting claims it's reached a stage of its cycle called the solar minimum. During the minimum, there are significantly fewer sunspots and its magnetic field weakens, allowing cosmic rays from outside our solar system to rain down on Earth. This doesn't tend to pose a threat to anyone here on Earth, but it's risky for astronauts and satellites outside our atmosphere.

The website Space Weather wrote: 'The sun has been without spots for 16 consecutive days–a sign that Solar Minimum is underway. 'Many people think Solar Minimum is uninteresting. Not so. 'This phase of the solar cycle brings extra cosmic rays and long-lasting holes in the sun's atmosphere.'

This solar slowdown often causes temporary cooling in Earth's atmosphere. Climate change deniers often hail this cooling as evidence that the heating of our world is about to go into reverse. Sadly, this is very unlikely to be true because the sun follows an 11-year cycle, meaning it will simply spring back to life in the coming years. However, once activity ramps up, the sun will be rocked by an increased number of gigantic 'monster' explosions, Nasa warned last week. Eruptions from the face of our star are called 'prominences' and cause vast amounts of superhot gas to shoot into space, often forming beautiful loops on the solar surface. During the solar minimum, the number of flares and sunspots is dramatically reduced.

(snip)

<More Disaster Here>
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#2 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 08:05 AM

View Postarticle, on 05 June 2019 - 08:04 AM, said:

This solar slowdown often causes temporary cooling in Earth's atmosphere. Climate change deniers often hail this cooling as evidence that the heating of our world is about to go into reverse. Sadly, this is very unlikely to be true because the sun follows an 11-year cycle, meaning it will simply spring back to life in the coming years. However, once activity ramps up, the sun will be rocked by an increased number of gigantic 'monster' explosions,


What's that you say? The sun (and planet) have cycles? Things are constantly changing without the interference of people? pffft... I don't believe it...
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#3 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 08:39 AM

Orange Sun BAD!!! :rolleyes:

If you want to track how this really affects climate, remember that there is a lag in the system to changes in input, lots of thermal inertia and feedback loops in the Earth's climate. Just start watching agricultural yields, especially at higher latitudes. You can manipulate the temperature data, but the plants will tell the true story.
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#4 User is online   Kilmerfan 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 09:40 AM

"It's Trumps fault! Orange man bad! Reeeee!"
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#5 User is online   Kilmerfan 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 09:44 AM

"In my disgrace
Boiling heat
Summer stench
'Neath the black
The sky looks dead
Call my name
Through the cream
And I'll hear you
Scream again

Black hole sun
Won't you come
And wash away the rain
Black hole sun
Won't you come
Won't you come"
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#6 User is offline   Bubbajoebob 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 11:42 AM

The most recent solar maximum was surprisingly weak. If the next one (5 to 7 years from now) is also weak it could be a sign that we're headed for another little ice age -- much more scary than all the global warming predictions. Maunder Minimum

This post has been edited by Bubbajoebob: 05 June 2019 - 11:43 AM

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#7 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 11:52 AM

View PostBubbajoebob, on 05 June 2019 - 11:42 AM, said:

The most recent solar maximum was surprisingly weak. If the next one (5 to 7 years from now) is also weak it could be a sign that we're headed for another little ice age -- much more scary than all the global warming predictions. Maunder Minimum



Some friends of mine recently retired and moved from Texas to Washington State. They had enough of the heat and humidity here. I keep telling her they made a bad choice because as soon as the cooling starts, Texas is the new Washington!


<Link to looming disaster>


https://doompaul.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/nicholson-frozen-the-shining-thumb-550x416-86906.jpg

This post has been edited by MTP Reggie: 05 June 2019 - 11:54 AM

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#8 User is offline   searcher 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 12:00 PM

It's quiet..........too quiet.

Mark
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#9 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 06:01 PM

View PostMTP Reggie, on 05 June 2019 - 08:05 AM, said:

What's that you say? The sun (and planet) have cycles? Things are constantly changing without the interference of people? pffft... I don't believe it...


Yes, cycles. Swings like a pendulum.

Historically, swings the OTHER way have done things like take out the then-nascent US power system in the late 1800s up to being (allegedly) responsible for the midwestern US/Canadian blackout of '89.

Problem is? Supply chain management. If another 1800s-type event occurs, there's not enough 'stock' available to make immediate replacements, assuming most/every transformer on the 'grid' blows as it did then. It takes time to get the factories back online to produce new ones. Then get distributed. Then get replaced. Think in terms of not days/weeks but months/years. Luck of the draw as to if when it happens we take it face first or are shielded by rotation.



---------------------

Eta: Backup Plan? Well, "old school" diesels will survive, if you want to get around. Once owned an '80 Mercedes 240D. No computer. Didn't need any electrics beyond getting started (which theoretically could be done with a hand-crank.) Likewise, VW Diesel Rabbits of the day. Fuel? No problem, If the apocalypse happens I can make my own bio-diesel.

This post has been edited by Dean Adam Smithee: 05 June 2019 - 06:17 PM

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#10 User is offline   Howsithangin 

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 08:30 PM

Damn Trump
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#11 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 08:06 AM

 Dean Adam Smithee, on 05 June 2019 - 06:01 PM, said:

Yes, cycles. Swings like a pendulum.


I'm pretty sure I was being facetious and my questions were rhetorical.
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#12 User is online   Taggart Transcontinental 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 08:38 AM

OK, who's been driving their SUV's on the sun!?!?!
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#13 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 09:03 AM

 Taggart Transcontinental, on 06 June 2019 - 08:38 AM, said:

OK, who's been driving their SUV's on the sun!?!?!


:blush:

I confess. It's also where I throw my plastic straws & styrofoam cups...

:blush:
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#14 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 01:11 PM

 MontyPython, on 06 June 2019 - 09:03 AM, said:

:blush:

I confess. It's also where I throw my plastic straws & styrofoam cups...

:blush:

But you have to do it at night... :rolleyes:

The more I've learned about the sun, the more I think if I'd gone to get a doctorate in physics I might have chosen solar physics over even my beloved quantum mechanics. Such a complex and difficult to predict thing, a roiling mass of fusion powered plasma, magnetic field lines twisting and turning, deep processes that take years to make it to the surface. Hampered, of course, by the fact we only have close up observations of one star, no smaller, larger, older, younger ones to compare to. Fascinating.
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#15 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 06:00 PM

 MTP Reggie, on 06 June 2019 - 08:06 AM, said:

I'm pretty sure I was being facetious and my questions were rhetorical.


Yes, of course. But it would have been remiss of me to not take the opportunity.
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#16 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 06:28 PM

 Severian, on 06 June 2019 - 01:11 PM, said:

But you have to do it at night... :rolleyes:

The more I've learned about the sun, the more I think if I'd gone to get a doctorate in physics I might have chosen solar physics over even my beloved quantum mechanics. Such a complex and difficult to predict thing, a roiling mass of fusion powered plasma, magnetic field lines twisting and turning, deep processes that take years to make it to the surface. Hampered, of course, by the fact we only have close up observations of one star, no smaller, larger, older, younger ones to compare to. Fascinating.


(only) an MS Applied Physics here. Solar? Well, I can reasonably approximate "Feynmans lecture on motion of the planets around the sun".

Solar in a "quantum" way?

Well, I've currently got a proposal in with DoE with ideas in both Solar Desalinization and Solar Hydrogen. Not that far different. I can explain right down to the quantum level how it works. Problem is the age-old equation 2 H2O(l) → O2(g) + 4 H+(aq) + 4e−. Problem is, it's always taken more energy in than you get out. I think I've solved that.
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#17 User is offline   Hieronymous 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 06:46 PM

That photo was airbrushed to make the Sun look more pretty.
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#18 User is online   Taggart Transcontinental 

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 07:21 PM

 Severian, on 06 June 2019 - 01:11 PM, said:

But you have to do it at night... :rolleyes:

The more I've learned about the sun, the more I think if I'd gone to get a doctorate in physics I might have chosen solar physics over even my beloved quantum mechanics. Such a complex and difficult to predict thing, a roiling mass of fusion powered plasma, magnetic field lines twisting and turning, deep processes that take years to make it to the surface. Hampered, of course, by the fact we only have close up observations of one star, no smaller, larger, older, younger ones to compare to. Fascinating.


Meh, it's a big arsed light bulb in the sky. Nothing more than that.
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#19 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 07:45 PM

View PostTaggart Transcontinental, on 06 June 2019 - 07:21 PM, said:

Meh, it's a big arsed light bulb in the sky. Nothing more than that.


It's much more than that.

It's like, y'know, "Cosmic", dude.

(In my best Dennis Hopper voice. LOL)
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#20 User is online   Taggart Transcontinental 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 09:00 AM

View PostMontyPython, on 06 June 2019 - 09:03 AM, said:

:blush:

I confess. It's also where I throw my plastic straws & styrofoam cups...

:blush:



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