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#1 User is offline   MTP Reggie 

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 07:21 AM

Millennial dads have pathetic DIY skills compared to baby boomers
By Tyler Schmall, SWNS
June 6, 2019 | 5:12pm
NY Post

<More Surprise Here>

Are dads' essential DIY skills in decline? Acc ording to new research, millennial dads are less capable than their own dads when it comes to everyday DIY fixes, preferring to rely on professional help instead. A new poll of 1,000 millennial dads and 1,000 baby boomer dads found that when a DIY task needs to be done at home, more than half of millennials prefer to call a professional. And when it comes to emergency "handiness" scenarios, millennial dads fall short in almost every category. Millennial dads are less likely than their boomer counterparts to be able to change a car tire on the side of the road, unblock a toilet or sink, reset a tripped circuit breaker or even open a stuck pickle jar with their hands.

The new survey, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Alarm.com, found that modern dads' toolkits have declined too. Many millennial dads reported not owning a cordless drill (46 percent), a stepladder (49 percent), a set of screwdrivers (38 percent) or even a hammer (32 percent) — an item owned by 93 percent of boomer dads.

Why the decline in DIY?

Both generations pointed to modern technology becoming harder to fix as the top reason. "The technology in the average home has evolved," says Anne Ferguson, VP of marketing at Alarm.com. "Hi-tech upgrades like smart home technology require professional support, especially safety and security upgrades. Even the handiest dads see the value of partnering with a professional service provider on an important project like a smart home security system."

The definition of what it means to be a "handy" dad has also changed, said 79 percent of millennials. Seventy-four percent of boomers agreed with them. For example, while boomer dads have the edge when it comes to traditional DIY, 62 percent of boomer dads concede that millennial dads are better at tech-related tasks. Millennial dads are also more likely than their own fathers to prioritize family time over DIY.

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#2 User is offline   Dutch13 

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 08:16 AM

I would imagine that much of the decline is due to 100 extra forms of entertainment. Back in the day, when dad came home from work, he had 3 channels on the television and a newspaper. These days, kids grow up with 1,000 channels, 6 different gaming systems, tablets, and smartphones. These kids become adults and never put give up those entertainment outlets.

Oh, and baby boomers also had PRIDE at doing things on their own. The story mentions that millennial dads are more likely to prioritize family time over DIY projects. When I was a kid, DIY projects WERE family time with the kids. As that has diminished......so has teaching kids to work with their hands and the patience and pride involved in completing things on your own.



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#3 User is offline   Martin 

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 09:43 AM

We Boomer men may excel the Millennials at DIY, but we are as nothing compared to our parents, the Depression kids.
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#4 User is offline   Severian 

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 10:10 AM

View PostMartin, on 07 June 2019 - 09:43 AM, said:

We Boomer men may excel the Millennials at DIY, but we are as nothing compared to our parents, the Depression kids.

No kidding. My dad could do auto repair, rebuild engines on lawnmowers, build furniture, anything carpentry or woodworking, do tile, masonry, pour concrete, do plumbing, air conditioner repair or fridges, work on jet aircraft, and maintain nuclear weapons. He grew up in the Depression, at 10 years old he was stoking the boiler on a sawmill before and after school, and grew up on a small farm where of course you have to do everything. He was amazing.
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#5 User is offline   Italian Biker 

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 11:41 AM

I think every generation will lose some of the DIY/mechanical skill of previous generations due to a lack of need because of technological advancements of a better way to complete a task.
My dad was a plumber, practically built the house I grew up in himself. I don't have nearly the skill or knowledge he had. But I'm not clueless with powertools and small engines either. And BTW, I may not drive a nail by a hammer as good as him, but that's when the air compressor and framing nailer comes in.
That said, there is a guy down the block from m that fits this description so much it's scary. Oh, and he's one of those harry potter fan boys.

This post has been edited by Italian Biker: 07 June 2019 - 11:53 AM

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#6 User is offline   Alexis 

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 08:11 PM

Do the schools still have "shop" classes like they used to, or "sewing and cooking"?
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#7 User is offline   RedSoloCup 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 07:09 AM

So no wonder more and more children are being left to die in hot cars....their dads are world class wimps!

This post has been edited by RedSoloCup: 08 June 2019 - 07:09 AM

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#8 User is offline   Oathtaker 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 07:16 AM

Guess I got a raw deal with the whole “Dad being handy” paradigm.

I’m a GenXer so....

The inability to repair stuff due to tech is baffling. I would never live in a “smart home”; the “old way of doing things” is just fine with me.

I will add that if I approach a project that I don’t feel confident I know enough about I do use my “smart phone” to do research. I use the camera on my “smart phone” to record serial and model numbers; it’s handy for that too.
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#9 User is offline   Oathtaker 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 07:17 AM

 Alexis, on 07 June 2019 - 08:11 PM, said:

Do the schools still have "shop" classes like they used to, or "sewing and cooking"?


Not around here...
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#10 User is offline   firecoco 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 07:27 AM

 Alexis, on 07 June 2019 - 08:11 PM, said:

Do the schools still have "shop" classes like they used to, or "sewing and cooking"?

Mike Rowe is now offering scholarships to people that will learn a trade...I think that's great
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#11 User is offline   Bubbajoebob 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 07:44 AM

When I bought my first house my dad told me I now have a permanent hobby: there's always something that needs to be done. And also, if you need a tool to do a job, just buy it because you're probably going to need it again. I've sure found lots of uses for things like locking pliers or a basin wrench than I thought I would.

I can do all the stuff listed in the first paragraph "change a car tire on the side of the road, unblock a toilet or sink, reset a tripped circuit breaker or even open a stuck pickle jar with their hands" but I'd consider that stuff just part of being an adult human being -- I'm surprised if anyone can't do that. With the internet, there's not much you can't find tutorials on doing, if you put in a little effort. This week's project is re-doing the grout in the shower -- I've never done it before, but the video on Youtube makes it look fairly simple.

But there's certainly a time to call in the pro. I happily paid for my natural gas dryer to be installed. If I screw up the grout in the shower it looks ugly and maybe some water leaks around the edge until I fix it. If I screw up installing anything using natural gas then my house burns down.
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#12 User is offline   firecoco 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 07:49 AM

 Bubbajoebob, on 08 June 2019 - 07:44 AM, said:

When I bought my first house my dad told me I now have a permanent hobby: there's always something that needs to be done. And also, if you need a tool to do a job, just buy it because you're probably going to need it again. I've sure found lots of uses for things like locking pliers or a basin wrench than I thought I would.

I can do all the stuff listed in the first paragraph "change a car tire on the side of the road, unblock a toilet or sink, reset a tripped circuit breaker or even open a stuck pickle jar with their hands" but I'd consider that stuff just part of being an adult human being -- I'm surprised if anyone can't do that. With the internet, there's not much you can't find tutorials on doing, if you put in a little effort. This week's project is re-doing the grout in the shower -- I've never done it before, but the video on Youtube makes it look fairly simple.

But there's certainly a time to call in the pro. I happily paid for my natural gas dryer to be installed. If I screw up the grout in the shower it looks ugly and maybe some water leaks around the edge until I fix it. If I screw up installing anything using natural gas then my house burns down.

I can walk into Home Depot blindfolded and find what I need
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#13 User is offline   Squirrel 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 07:51 AM

I think the saddest part is they just aren’t willing to learn or try. I have 1/4 the skills my dad did in a lot of hands on things. But I also have you tube google and the information available on my phone. It may take me longer or 2-4 tries but I can find how to do most anything and get it done. But kids today meaning under 30 from my experience don’t even want to try or learn. I don’t know how many times I’ve had someone ask me to help fix thier car instead of take it to a shop then just wander off and play on thier phone or disappear while I did it for free. I finally got to the point I’ll help by pointing out here take this wrench now take that bolt out, etc. the first time they complain or wander off I just tell them here’s a # to a garage I trust. Call them I’m done.
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#14 User is online   LeansToTheRight 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 07:59 AM

Who are millennials calling to help them open stuck pickle jars? :scratch:
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#15 User is offline   stick 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 09:45 AM

As long as they can Google and YouTube, they believe they have most of “What do I do now?” covered. But it’s the tribal knowledge, the real nuances of why we do what we do as taught by our elders that gets missed. I keep trying to get my youngest to go for a skilled trade and as long as he stays out of jail I think that’s where he ends up. Lots of money to be made out there for a good machinist, welder, or millwright.
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#16 User is online   zurg 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 09:56 AM

One of my pet peeves is that people have no sense of direction (physically). I grew up learning the sport of orienteering, I know it’s not very popular here, but it’s extremely handy. Learning to use the compass and a map, and better yet, once that is mastered, you don’t need the compass much at all, just read the map, and know which way is north. Today’s people don’t know how to get from A to B without their smartphone GPS anymore.

But maybe as skills are lost, other skills are gained.
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#17 User is offline   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 10:11 AM

 Martin, on 07 June 2019 - 09:43 AM, said:

We Boomer men may excel the Millennials at DIY, but we are as nothing compared to our parents, the Depression kids.


:exactly:

Add to that farmers.

Both of my parents grew up on a farm in and after the depression era.

Farmers cannot afford to call and hire people to fix or build things for them especially back in the day. They have to do everything themselves and most had taught their kids to do the same.
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#18 User is offline   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 10:16 AM

 Bubbajoebob, on 08 June 2019 - 07:44 AM, said:

When I bought my first house my dad told me I now have a permanent hobby: there's always something that needs to be done. And also, if you need a tool to do a job, just buy it because you're probably going to need it again. I've sure found lots of uses for things like locking pliers or a basin wrench than I thought I would.

I can do all the stuff listed in the first paragraph "change a car tire on the side of the road, unblock a toilet or sink, reset a tripped circuit breaker or even open a stuck pickle jar with their hands" but I'd consider that stuff just part of being an adult human being -- I'm surprised if anyone can't do that. With the internet, there's not much you can't find tutorials on doing, if you put in a little effort. This week's project is re-doing the grout in the shower -- I've never done it before, but the video on Youtube makes it look fairly simple.

But there's certainly a time to call in the pro. I happily paid for my natural gas dryer to be installed. If I screw up the grout in the shower it looks ugly and maybe some water leaks around the edge until I fix it. If I screw up installing anything using natural gas then my house burns down.

My father and grandpa always taught me that you can never go wrong in buying good tools to do the job yourself and it saves money instead of hiring someone else to do it. Plus you will always have those tools to do repairs again.

I have a helluva tool collection for just about everything.

This post has been edited by Rock N' Roll Right Winger: 08 June 2019 - 10:20 AM

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#19 User is offline   USNRETWIFE 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 10:39 AM

 LeansToTheRight, on 08 June 2019 - 07:59 AM, said:

Who are millennials calling to help them open stuck pickle jars? :scratch:

Their mothers.
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#20 User is offline   RedSoloCup 

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 11:50 AM

 LeansToTheRight, on 08 June 2019 - 07:59 AM, said:

Who are millennials calling to help them open stuck pickle jars? :scratch:


911?
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