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Trona, California, was trying to bounce back. Then an earthquake hit. Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   tcotrel 

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  Posted 07 July 2019 - 12:15 PM

EXCERPT

Trona, California, was trying to bounce back. Then an earthquake hit. Then a bigger one.


TRONA, Calif. – The biggest earthquake to hit California in two decades chose one of smallest, hardscrabble towns in the state as a prime target.
Every bit as much as Ridgecrest some 30 miles away, Trona, a town struggling to halt its downward decline, bore the brunt of the two-fisted earthquake – first a 6.4-magnitude punch on the Fourth of July, then a giant 7.1-magnitude blow Friday night, with many large aftershocks in between.
Rock slides closed roads, cutting off the population of about 1,500. Electricity was lost, then restored. Drinking water was lost and is being trucked in, with nothing more important with temperatures hovering in the 90s.
To many of residents of tiny Trona, the quake was a knockout. Even if they escaped the toppled chimneys, broken kitchen crockery – or worse – of their neighbors, the town's residents are left with streets and sidewalks with webs of cracks that look from above like so many spider veins.
Even before the quake, Trona was a city that appeared to be hanging by its fingernails, beholden to a single processing plant, Searles Valley Minerals, that makes products like soda ash and borax. More than a century old, the plant is still the reason the town exists. On Saturday, the post-quake condition of the sprawling facility was yet to be disclosed. A security officer guarding the plant said he couldn't comment.
"It's tragic," said Margaret Brush, who, at 91, believes she is Trona's oldest lifelong resident. "I hope this is not the end."
And the quake comes as the town's more active citizens were trying to stage a civic comeback that would include a lush new park, community center and a cleanup campaign called "Trona Care." Residents already have turned several buildings into museums celebrating its colorful past through borax and other minerals, a direct connection to Death Valley about 80 miles away by car.
It would be no easy comeback. Many of the Trona area's homes are abandoned – windowless hulks stripped of anything usable. Residents say that while they have many wonderful neighbors, they have been besieged by squatters and that sometimes empty houses are torched. The air around the plant is pungent with sulfur.

The whole thing

Fun fact: A government permit is needed to tear down an abandoned building (this being California). Average cost to do so is $12,000.00.

I worked in Ridgecrest in the summer of 1983, and got to visit Trona. Great places. I really want Trona to come back.
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#2 User is offline   Taggart Transcontinental 

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 03:22 PM

View Posttcotrel, on 07 July 2019 - 12:15 PM, said:

EXCERPT

Trona, California, was trying to bounce back. Then an earthquake hit. Then a bigger one.


TRONA, Calif. – The biggest earthquake to hit California in two decades chose one of smallest, hardscrabble towns in the state as a prime target.
Every bit as much as Ridgecrest some 30 miles away, Trona, a town struggling to halt its downward decline, bore the brunt of the two-fisted earthquake – first a 6.4-magnitude punch on the Fourth of July, then a giant 7.1-magnitude blow Friday night, with many large aftershocks in between.
Rock slides closed roads, cutting off the population of about 1,500. Electricity was lost, then restored. Drinking water was lost and is being trucked in, with nothing more important with temperatures hovering in the 90s.
To many of residents of tiny Trona, the quake was a knockout. Even if they escaped the toppled chimneys, broken kitchen crockery – or worse – of their neighbors, the town's residents are left with streets and sidewalks with webs of cracks that look from above like so many spider veins.
Even before the quake, Trona was a city that appeared to be hanging by its fingernails, beholden to a single processing plant, Searles Valley Minerals, that makes products like soda ash and borax. More than a century old, the plant is still the reason the town exists. On Saturday, the post-quake condition of the sprawling facility was yet to be disclosed. A security officer guarding the plant said he couldn't comment.
"It's tragic," said Margaret Brush, who, at 91, believes she is Trona's oldest lifelong resident. "I hope this is not the end."
And the quake comes as the town's more active citizens were trying to stage a civic comeback that would include a lush new park, community center and a cleanup campaign called "Trona Care." Residents already have turned several buildings into museums celebrating its colorful past through borax and other minerals, a direct connection to Death Valley about 80 miles away by car.
It would be no easy comeback. Many of the Trona area's homes are abandoned – windowless hulks stripped of anything usable. Residents say that while they have many wonderful neighbors, they have been besieged by squatters and that sometimes empty houses are torched. The air around the plant is pungent with sulfur.

The whole thing

Fun fact: A government permit is needed to tear down an abandoned building (this being California). Average cost to do so is $12,000.00.

I worked in Ridgecrest in the summer of 1983, and got to visit Trona. Great places. I really want Trona to come back.


Earthquakes don't need no permit!
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#3 User is online   First Sarge 

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Posted 08 July 2019 - 08:56 AM

I’m sorry that the town is hit so hard, but a park, community center and museums are places to visit and borax is not so interesting to make people move there. You need to look for investments from outside of the town from new businesses. I don’t think this town was on a comeback and if the plant is not economically feasible the town will die
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#4 User is offline   Joe the Pagan 

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Posted 08 July 2019 - 11:32 AM

View PostFirst Sarge, on 08 July 2019 - 08:56 AM, said:

I’m sorry that the town is hit so hard, but a park, community center and museums are places to visit and borax is not so interesting to make people move there. You need to look for investments from outside of the town from new businesses. I don’t think this town was on a comeback and if the plant is not economically feasible the town will die


If I recall correctly there used to be import restrictions on borax. Until some 3rd world country gave a lot of money to the Clinton Foundation.
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