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A Story I Dare The Washington Post To Report Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Liz 

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 05:10 PM

A Story I Dare The Washington Post To Report

Don Surber
Saturday, August 10, 2019

[Too short to excerpt]

The Guardian reported, "Schoolchildren in China work overnight to produce Amazon Alexa devices."

They are as young as 16 and are listed as interns. The newspaper cited interviews with workers and leaked documents from Amazon’s supplier Foxconn.

The Guardian reported, "According to the documents, the teenagers – drafted in from schools and technical colleges in and around the central southern city of Hengyang – are classified as interns, and their teachers are paid by the factory to accompany them. Teachers are asked to encourage uncooperative pupils to accept overtime work on top of regular shifts.

"Some of the pupils making Amazon’s Alexa-enabled Echo and Echo Dot devices along with Kindles have been required to work for more than two months to supplement staffing levels at the factory during peak production periods, researchers found. More than 1,000 pupils are employed, aged from 16 to 18.

"Chinese factories are allowed to employ students aged 16 and older, but these schoolchildren are not allowed to work nights or overtime.

"Foxconn, which also makes iPhones for Apple, admitted that students had been employed illegally and said it was taking immediate action to fix the situation."

How fitting that a machine that spies on Americans is made by overworked, underage people in Red China.

The Guardian reported, "A spokesperson for Amazon, which is headed by Jeff Bezos, the richest person in the world with a fortune estimated at more than $100 billion, said the company would not tolerate violations of its supplier code of conduct and regularly assessed suppliers, often using independent auditors, to monitor compliance and improvement."

Sure.

If Bezos were so concerned, he would recall all the Alexa spying machines made under these conditions.

Meanwhile his newspaper, the Washington Post, decries the separation of children at our border.

Where is the outcry against the conscription of children to build Jeff Bezos's spying machines?

UPDATE: Glenn Reynolds linked the post (thanks) and reminded us, "Democracy dies in darkness."
That's their plan.

Link
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#2 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 05:25 PM

I'm less concerned about "Child Labor" (Hey, at 12 YO I could've used some cash money beyond my 50c "allowance"). I'm more concerned about "China". I simply don't TRUST them to not be spying on every device they ship to the USA).
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#3 User is offline   zurg 

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 06:18 PM

Not that I needed another reason not to get Alexa, but here’s reason #298 why I don’t want an Alexa. And yeah, I don’t believe for a second that they ain’t listening all the time.
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#4 User is offline   LeansToTheRight 

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 08:31 PM

I’m in somewhat agreement with others about not being too concerned about “child labor” - especially when we’re talking about 16-18 year-olds. But I am concerned about the working conditions and the hours-of-day required to work, and the number of hours per day required to work. I’m fine if 16 can be an age to be a full-time employee. But if 16 is still required to be in school, then there needs to be protections in place to ensure they have adequate time for eating, studying, and sleeping.

I am also somewhat concerned about “smart devices” being used by all kinds of governments (including our own) as well as companies spying on consumers.
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#5 User is offline   Joe the Pagan 

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 10:14 PM

View Postzurg, on 11 August 2019 - 06:18 PM, said:

Not that I needed another reason not to get Alexa, but here’s reason #298 why I don’t want an Alexa. And yeah, I don’t believe for a second that they ain’t listening all the time.


I did some research on voice commands. Most of the devices convert you speech to a sound file, sends sound files to a server that figures out what you said and sends the text back to the device.
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#6 User is offline   Howsithangin 

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 10:14 PM

View Postzurg, on 11 August 2019 - 06:18 PM, said:

Not that I needed another reason not to get Alexa, but here’s reason #298 why I don’t want an Alexa. And yeah, I don’t believe for a second that they ain’t listening all the time.


Ditto.

Yet another example in support of my "neo-luddite" existence
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#7 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 11:55 PM

View PostHowsithangin, on 11 August 2019 - 10:14 PM, said:

Ditto.

Yet another example in support of my "neo-luddite" existence


Same here. I recall somebody telling me Alexa (or some similar product) never listens to anything unless you say "Alexa" first. I asked him "How does it hear you say 'Alexa' if it wasn't already listening?"

He couldn't answer that.

B)
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#8 User is offline   moocow 

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 12:40 AM

View PostMontyPython, on 11 August 2019 - 11:55 PM, said:

Same here. I recall somebody telling me Alexa (or some similar product) never listens to anything unless you say "Alexa" first. I asked him "How does it hear you say 'Alexa' if it wasn't already listening?"

He couldn't answer that.

B)

Generally, the way the system would work is you have a low power voice energy detector. This device does not decode speech at all, but simply looks if there is sound energy within the voice spectrum. Once the voice energy detector senses enough energy in the voice spectrum, it will wake up a processor. The processor will record the sound, perform some actual voice recognition algorithms, and try to detect the activation phrase, such as “Alexa” or “Siri”. If the processor gets a good enough match, it will then continue recording and send to the cloud for full voice recognition. If it didn’t detect the activation phrase, it will probably reactivate the voice energy detector and go to sleep.

The primary reason for the “round-aboutness” of this system is to save power, particularly for battery operated devices. Constantly recording and uploading to the cloud would take a lot of power and shorten the use time of your device. Of course, power is secondary to plug in devices, so they could be on all the time.
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#9 User is offline   MontyPython 

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 11:37 AM

View Postmoocow, on 12 August 2019 - 12:40 AM, said:

Generally, the way the system would work is you have a low power voice energy detector. This device does not decode speech at all, but simply looks if there is sound energy within the voice spectrum. Once the voice energy detector senses enough energy in the voice spectrum, it will wake up a processor. The processor will record the sound, perform some actual voice recognition algorithms, and try to detect the activation phrase, such as “Alexa” or “Siri”. If the processor gets a good enough match, it will then continue recording and send to the cloud for full voice recognition. If it didn’t detect the activation phrase, it will probably reactivate the voice energy detector and go to sleep.

The primary reason for the “round-aboutness” of this system is to save power, particularly for battery operated devices. Constantly recording and uploading to the cloud would take a lot of power and shorten the use time of your device. Of course, power is secondary to plug in devices, so they could be on all the time.


LOL. Was that Greek? Tagalog? Russian?

:shrug:
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