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#1 User is offline   Junto 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 02:11 PM

Controversial bail reform springs serial robbery suspect — who then pulls off fifth heist

By Larry Celona, Ben Feuerherd and Ruth Weissmann - January 11, 2020


Controversial bail reform springs serial robbery suspect — who then pulls off fifth heist




He’s laughing all the way to the next bank.

A John Dillinger wannabe is on the loose thanks to lax bail laws that set him free despite his arrest in connection to four Manhattan bank robberies.

Sprung on Thursday, he promptly robbed a fifth bank, in Brooklyn, on Friday, law enforcement sources told The Post.

So cops spent Saturday hunting once again for fugitive Gerod Woodberry, who allegedly pulled four heists at Chase banks in Chelsea, the Upper West Side and the West Village between Dec. 30 and Jan. 8.

Because Woodberry allegedly robbed using a note, rather than a gun, no New York jail can currently hold him, no matter how many times he strikes.

His alleged grand larcenies are classified as non-violent felonies. And under the bail reform law that took effect Jan. 1, most non-violent felonies — including bank robberies carried out without a weapon — are no longer bail eligible, meaning no judge can order him held pending trial.

Should cops pinch Woodberry on the fifth alleged heist, he’ll only be sprung again.

The insanity of the new law clearly wasn’t lost on the prime suspect.

“I can’t believe they let me out,” Woodberry marveled as he retrieved his vouchered property at One Police Plaza in lower Manhattan, sources told The Post. “What were they thinking?”

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea voiced his frustration after The Post broke Woodberry’s story online Saturday.

“What motivation does this suspect have to return to court? None,” Shea tweeted.

“This makes NYPD cops’ jobs harder, and makes New Yorkers less safe.”

(excerpt)

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ETA - It's not the Bee either...

This post has been edited by Junto: 12 January 2020 - 02:13 PM

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#2 User is offline   erp 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 02:35 PM

Here is a novel idea. Maybe the bank should not give him the money?

I know, how are they supposed to know he is not armed, right?. But I suspect the note was not threatening. If it was, his crime would be assault. Not just robbery.

Maybe some of you law types can clear this up?

It just seems like the bank is quick to give up the cash.
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#3 User is offline   Confessor 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 03:18 PM

 erp, on 12 January 2020 - 02:35 PM, said:

Here is a novel idea. Maybe the bank should not give him the money?

I know, how are they supposed to know he is not armed, right?. But I suspect the note was not threatening. If it was, his crime would be assault. Not just robbery.

Maybe some of you law types can clear this up?

It just seems like the bank is quick to give up the cash.


I suspect that personnel in these banks have been told to comply to avoid them being injured. Much like businesses tell their employees to not engage thieves when they “shoplift”. I would imagine they are insured against robbery, so why try to stop the criminals? The criminals know this and with this new law, they know they won’t be accosted when they ask politely for the money. My question is, if one of them walks into a bank and hands the teller a note saying “I would like 100,000 dollars” and the teller gives it to them, what are they going to charge them with? I think we would all like 100,000 dollars 😬. I imagine that would likely be deemed a crime due to the circumstances, but I think you get my point.
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#4 User is offline   Hercules 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 03:22 PM

View Posterp, on 12 January 2020 - 02:35 PM, said:

Here is a novel idea. Maybe the bank should not give him the money?

I know, how are they supposed to know he is not armed, right?. But I suspect the note was not threatening. If it was, his crime would be assault. Not just robbery.

Maybe some of you law types can clear this up?

It just seems like the bank is quick to give up the cash.


I's insured.
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#5 User is offline   zurg 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 03:41 PM

 Hercules, on 12 January 2020 - 03:22 PM, said:

I's insured.

Yup, they’s insured, by us, the taxpayers.
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#6 User is offline   Natural Selection 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 04:49 PM

I thought they were supposed to give these idiots cash with dye packs that explode? Did they make dye packs illegal because some bank robber got injured by them?
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#7 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 07:13 PM

View Posterp, on 12 January 2020 - 02:35 PM, said:

Here is a novel idea. Maybe the bank should not give him the money?

I know, how are they supposed to know he is not armed, right?. But I suspect the note was not threatening. If it was, his crime would be assault. Not just robbery.

Maybe some of you law types can clear this up?

It just seems like the bank is quick to give up the cash.


Not a Law type but a "Life Safety Systems" Engineering type.

Two words: "Man Traps". Either double doors or a revolving door; I've designed such things for companies like Intel and Chevron.

Revolving door, with panes made of 1-1/2" "bulletproof" LexanTM: Go in, it stops midway though, does a quick scan for explosives or TOO MUCH metal as in "handgun". if you're cleared, it continues and you can go in. If it Alarms the Security Command Center (SCC) can choose to lock you there or reverse the door and back you out.

Double door, similar concept. Enter the first set of doors, it closes. Second set of doors doesn't open until you're cleared.

It's NOT terrible expensive. Heck, I've set up Ideal Pawn & Jewelry in Doraville GA with a "poor man's" version of the same concept. (Just E of I-85 on Northcrest rd just N of I-285). Go ahead, check it out.)
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#8 User is offline   Junto 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 08:07 PM

 erp, on 12 January 2020 - 02:35 PM, said:

Here is a novel idea. Maybe the bank should not give him the money?

I know, how are they supposed to know he is not armed, right?. But I suspect the note was not threatening. If it was, his crime would be assault. Not just robbery.

Maybe some of you law types can clear this up?

It just seems like the bank is quick to give up the cash.

The second and fourth robberies he got nothing.

This seems like a perfect way to feed a drug habit. Get $1000+, buy DOC, maybe get caught/released, rinse-repeat. This will catch on with a whole host of crimes and criminal types.
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#9 User is offline   Junto 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 08:10 PM

 Dean Adam Smithee, on 12 January 2020 - 07:13 PM, said:

Not a Law type but a "Life Safety Systems" Engineering type.

Two words: "Man Traps". Either double doors or a revolving door; I've designed such things for companies like Intel and Chevron.

Revolving door, with panes made of 1-1/2" "bulletproof" LexanTM: Go in, it stops midway though, does a quick scan for explosives or TOO MUCH metal as in "handgun". if you're cleared, it continues and you can go in. If it Alarms the Security Command Center (SCC) can choose to lock you there or reverse the door and back you out.

Double door, similar concept. Enter the first set of doors, it closes. Second set of doors doesn't open until you're cleared.

It's NOT terrible expensive. Heck, I've set up Ideal Pawn & Jewelry in Doraville GA with a "poor man's" version of the same concept. (Just E of I-85 on Northcrest rd just N of I-285). Go ahead, check it out.)

I read an article a few years ago about security systems at entrances that can pour out odorless, clear pheromone? type chemical tracers that can be tracked. Have you heard of these systems being commercially used yet?
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#10 User is offline   USNRETWIFE 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 08:18 PM

Why don't the banks just open their doors and put a sign out front saying "Free cash to anyone with a note"? That would save everyone the headache of robbery. New Yorkers voted for this kind of crap. The trouble is not everyone they release will stay in NY, but other states will have messes to clean up too, thanks to NY. But then again, if I wanted extra money NY is where I would head, with my notebook and pen.
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#11 User is offline   Rock N' Roll Right Winger 

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 08:43 PM

View Posterp, on 12 January 2020 - 02:35 PM, said:

Here is a novel idea. Maybe the bank should not give him the money?

I know, how are they supposed to know he is not armed, right?. But I suspect the note was not threatening. If it was, his crime would be assault. Not just robbery.

Maybe some of you law types can clear this up?

It just seems like the bank is quick to give up the cash.

Bank and retail store employees are told to not ever resist and to give up the cash and never ever stop a shoplifter or else they will be fired. It's zero tolerance to the employees thanks to their insurance companies.

This post has been edited by Rock N' Roll Right Winger: 12 January 2020 - 08:43 PM

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#12 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 13 January 2020 - 03:44 PM

View PostJunto, on 12 January 2020 - 08:10 PM, said:

I read an article a few years ago about security systems at entrances that can pour out odorless, clear pheromone? type chemical tracers that can be tracked. Have you heard of these systems being commercially used yet?


Haven't heard of that, but some years back the DoD was looking at the possibility of pumping in fentanyl-based knockout gas into these man-traps in ultra-high-security facilities. The idea was (supposedly) discarded on the grounds that it would violate chemical weapons treaties, and the Russians over-doing it trying to rescue the movie theater hostages didn't help either. Still though, it wouldn't surprise me if this in in use somewhere, in a facility where you'll never hear about it if it IS used; it's just too good of an idea to pass up.

The Nation (2003): The Pentagon’s ‘Nonlethal’ Gas
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#13 User is offline   zurg 

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Posted 13 January 2020 - 04:47 PM

 Dean Adam Smithee, on 13 January 2020 - 03:44 PM, said:

Haven't heard of that, but some years back the DoD was looking at the possibility of pumping in fentanyl-based knockout gas into these man-traps in ultra-high-security facilities. The idea was (supposedly) discarded on the grounds that it would violate chemical weapons treaties, and the Russians over-doing it trying to rescue the movie theater hostages didn't help either. Still though, it wouldn't surprise me if this in in use somewhere, in a facility where you'll never hear about it if it IS used; it's just too good of an idea to pass up.

The Nation (2003): The Pentagon’s ‘Nonlethal’ Gas

It’s a good idea; it’s just that the right people weren’t in charge....
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#14 User is offline   Dean Adam Smithee 

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Posted 13 January 2020 - 06:35 PM

View Postzurg, on 13 January 2020 - 04:47 PM, said:

It’s a good idea; it’s just that the right people weren’t in charge....


As soon as I posted that I thought of the film The Ghost And The Darkness (1996) with Michael Douglas, Based on a True Story. Recurring theme was that they kept trying to build various versions of a "lion trap" to capture two rogue lions that were terrorizing railroad workers in colonial India/Africa (can't remember which). None of the traps ever works but the recurring quote was, "... but it's a good idea". LOL.

Seriously, though, I would have no qualms about deploying this on CERTAIN sites. it's not just a GOOD idea but a GREAT idea. Consider a building (or a ship) where maybe some cryptologic, nuclear secrets, whatever, are in an inner room that MUST be protected from being stormed "AT ALL COSTS". The "secure" room would have an ante room that serves as a "Man-Trap"; any unauthorized person(s) storm into the ante-room, gas them.

How to protect the "secure" room? Positive pressure, or Z-purge as we would call it in the industrial world. In the semiconductor world such as at Intel and others, it's part of "Clean Room" design; slightly higher atmospheric pressure by pumping in air that's been filtered and purified to within an inch of it's life. No contaminants get in; open a door - most of which are mantrap design - and the pressure pushes the contaminants outward rather than sucking them inward.

Of course the obvious question is, If "Clean Rooms" are so great, what aren't Hospitals built that way? I'm glad you asked that. The Smithee Org is working on it. Biggest hurdle is "cost". Construction costs for a 'Typical' office space with about 4 changes of air per hour (per building code) is ~$200/sq. ft. Hospital-grade space is about $400-$500/sq ft. Clean Rooms start at about $1,000/sq ft. Biggest problem is that hospital administrators are usually neither MD's nor Engineers but typically MBAs or somesuch. "Bean Counters".
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#15 User is offline   zurg 

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Posted 13 January 2020 - 11:18 PM

 Dean Adam Smithee, on 13 January 2020 - 06:35 PM, said:

As soon as I posted that I thought of the film The Ghost And The Darkness (1996) with Michael Douglas, Based on a True Story. Recurring theme was that they kept trying to build various versions of a "lion trap" to capture two rogue lions that were terrorizing railroad workers in colonial India/Africa (can't remember which). None of the traps ever works but the recurring quote was, "... but it's a good idea". LOL.

Seriously, though, I would have no qualms about deploying this on CERTAIN sites. it's not just a GOOD idea but a GREAT idea. Consider a building (or a ship) where maybe some cryptologic, nuclear secrets, whatever, are in an inner room that MUST be protected from being stormed "AT ALL COSTS". The "secure" room would have an ante room that serves as a "Man-Trap"; any unauthorized person(s) storm into the ante-room, gas them.

How to protect the "secure" room? Positive pressure, or Z-purge as we would call it in the industrial world. In the semiconductor world such as at Intel and others, it's part of "Clean Room" design; slightly higher atmospheric pressure by pumping in air that's been filtered and purified to within an inch of it's life. No contaminants get in; open a door - most of which are mantrap design - and the pressure pushes the contaminants outward rather than sucking them inward.

Of course the obvious question is, If "Clean Rooms" are so great, what aren't Hospitals built that way? I'm glad you asked that. The Smithee Org is working on it. Biggest hurdle is "cost". Construction costs for a 'Typical' office space with about 4 changes of air per hour (per building code) is ~$200/sq. ft. Hospital-grade space is about $400-$500/sq ft. Clean Rooms start at about $1,000/sq ft. Biggest problem is that hospital administrators are usually neither MD's nor Engineers but typically MBAs or somesuch. "Bean Counters".

Trump should install one of those at the White House and apply super high intensity when Pelosi or Schiff stop by for a visit.
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#16 User is offline   grimreefer 

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 09:51 PM

WATCH: Democrats’ ‘Bail Reform’ Has Already Cost A Life. ‘Seething’ Family Speaks Out.
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