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pepperonikkid

Native American activist and former Oberlin professor indicted by feds

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pepperonikkid

Native American activist and former Oberlin professor indicted by feds over stealing grant money

 

 

http://www.americanthinker.com

By Thomas Lifson

September 28, 2017

 

 

Article:

 

 

This news has received almost no national attention and comes to us via the Oberlin Review, the official student newspaper at Oberlin College.

 

Former Oberlin Professor Robert Roche was formally indicted on federal charges of conspiracy and theft of government funds last Wednesday.

 

An Apache Native American himself, Roche serves as the executive director of the American Indian Education Center and is a prominent national activist in the fight to end racism against indigenous peoples. However, he may have harmed and stolen from the very people he has fought to defend.

 

Roche and his alleged co-conspirator, Craig McGuire of Cleveland, are accused of embezzling over $180,000 in federal grant money. Roche allegedly pocketed about $77,000 for personal use.

 

McGuire pled guilty in April to charges raised against him. The upcoming trial will be presided over by Judge Douglas D. Dodd. U.S. Attorney Justin E. Herdman, representing the Northern District of Ohio, will be prosecuting the case.

 

"Mr. Roche took tens of thousands of dollars earmarked for Native American children and families and put the money in his own pockets," Herdman said in a statement released by the U.S. Attorney's Office.

 

McGuire admitted to applying for a Circles of Care grant through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The grant was intended to support mental health and wellness programs for Native families.

 

On the application filed by McGuire, however, Roche made false statements, including the mention of a wellness department and a "positive paths" after-school program. The programs never existed and the money was subsequently never used to support Native peoples. Additionally, Roche supposedly fraudulently listed employees that were never hired and have never been associated with the American Indian Education Center.

 

Professor Roche is, of course, entitled to a presumption of innocence in court, but with the guilty plea of his alleged collaborator and probable testimony, things look bad for him. I can find no reference to any advanced degrees he has received, so it is an interesting question as to on what basis he was invited to join the august faculty of a prestigious and wealthy college. Were the same standards applied to him as to their faculty candidates?

 

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gravelrash

Meh, call the $77,000 "operating expenses, overhead, adminstration fees, billable hours, etc". You don't expect people to help you for free, do you?

 

Drop the "share-ade" of grants and charity. Hold people accountable through measurable results and paychecks. You will spend even more money investigating and prosecuting less frequently.

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Dean Adam Smithee

Let the Native Americans (I forget what the PC word is these days) "do what needs to be done" according to tribal ways. You won't hear a peep from me.

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gravelrash

Let the Native Americans (I forget what the PC word is these days) "do what needs to be done" according to tribal ways. You won't hear a peep from me.

 

America is a geo-political construct. I am a Native American.

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Oathtaker

America is a geo-political construct. I am a Native American.

 

I didn’t use those exact terms but said something to this degree to my youngin’s “history” teacher. Boy was she pissed.

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USNRETWIFE

Let the Native Americans (I forget what the PC word is these days) "do what needs to be done" according to tribal ways. You won't hear a peep from me.

My best friend for 40 years, is Indian, she says Indian, so I say Indian. I grew up, and live again, 50 miles from the rez, and it is Indian around here. erst060.gif

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Martin

"American Indian" is of course a misnomer as the people you're referring to live half a world away from India. Yet, to refer to them as "Native Americans" is simply replacing one misnomer with another.

 

Unless you claim that the American Indian tribes evolve or were created separately from the rest of the human race, they are immigrants. All of the anthropological evidence indicates that the human race evolved from other primates in Africa and migrated to other continents even if that process was divinely guided. Archeologists have approximately dated the immigration of the ancestors of the American Indians tribes. If one who has U.S. citizenship by birth is not "native" because his ancestors came from elsewhere, that is also true of American Indians.

 

Now that the status of American Indian is an entry in the Victim Olympics, it pays to identify as one. Most of the people who claim American Indian ancestry are not registered as members of government-recognized tribes. Senator Fauxcahontas has been unable to show any clear evidence that any of her ancestors were American Indians. Former professor Ward Churchill claimed membership in the Mandan tribe, unsupported by tribal records. No one at their colleges dared to require them to show that they really are descendants of American Indians. That would be racist. It was safer to let them in on the American Indian race hustle.

 

Robert Roche, who may very well be an actual Apache, seems to have taken the race hustle a bit too far. His accomplice, McGuire, has confessed to it. You watch, Roche and others are going to call their prosecutions racially motivated.

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MontyPython

You watch, Roche and others are going to call their prosecutions racially motivated.

 

Yup, I'd call that a given. Just like the moron NFL protesters are idiotically proclaiming opposition to their protests must be racially motivated.

 

:rolleyes:

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Hieronymous

Let the Native Americans (I forget what the PC word is these days) "do what needs to be done" according to tribal ways. You won't hear a peep from me.

Not sure what the PC term is either. I have a couple friends who are Navajo and they actually greet me with "How". Who says natives don't have a sense of humor...

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Hieronymous

My best friend for 40 years, is Indian, she says Indian, so I say Indian. I grew up, and live again, 50 miles from the rez, and it is Indian around here. erst060.gif

 

I know Navajo and White Mountain and San Carlos Apache here and they refer to themselves simply as native.

 

I don't know what this guy was claiming to do on behalf of the native population, but from what I gather the biggest problems on reservations are interconnected: Unemployment, alcoholism, and a suicide rate that is almost beyond belief. Reservations that get money through casino royalty checks are not exempt from this apparently.

Edited by Hieronymous

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Martin
I don't know what this guy was claiming to do on behalf of the native population, but from what I gather the biggest problems on reservations are interconnected: Unemployment, alcoholism, and a suicide rate that is almost beyond belief. Reservations that get money through casino royalty checks are not exempt from this apparently.

 

The biggest problems on Indian reservations are tribal government and lack of private ownership, and yes, they are connected. If you live on a reservation where the land is owned in common, a bank won't lend you a mortgage because they cannot foreclose if you don't pay. They would have to pursue foreclosure in tribal courts they cannot rely on. An Indian who lives off the reservation doesn't have that problem. The loan underwriter will look at his credit history, his income, and the loan to value ratio of the property. Most of the time, he will approve the mortgage because the bank is in business to lend interest-paying loans with good security.

 

Tribes' sovereign status exempts them from state laws against gambling. Unfortunately, cities and states which have promoted gambling as an economic development project have seen little economic development from it. They, like many Indian reservations, wanted to be the next Las Vegas but ended up more like the next Atlantic City. A few well-connected people prosper from it while the average Joe benefits little or none.

 

 

 

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USNRETWIFE

Not sure what the PC term is either. I have a couple friends who are Navajo and they actually greet me with "How". Who says natives don't have a sense of humor...

The first time I heard "Indian, dot not feathers" was from my friend.

 

I know Navajo and White Mountain and San Carlos Apache here and they refer to themselves simply as native.

 

I don't know what this guy was claiming to do on behalf of the native population, but from what I gather the biggest problems on reservations are interconnected: Unemployment, alcoholism, and a suicide rate that is almost beyond belief. Reservations that get money through casino royalty checks are not exempt from this apparently.

Throw meth into the mix. It is a problem on the Rosebud Reservation, and I presume, others.

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oki

My best friend for 40 years, is Indian, she says Indian, so I say Indian. I grew up, and live again, 50 miles from the rez, and it is Indian around here. erst060.gif

 

 

Growing up in Bismarck and living in Green Bay much the exact same in these parts.

Wonder how many people realize that the term 'Indian' started because Columbus did realize he found a whole new land mass/continent and though he landed in East India and that's why he called them Indians.

 

Oki

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Coach

Growing up in Bismarck and living in Green Bay much the exact same in these parts.

Wonder how many people realize that the term 'Indian' started because Columbus did realize he found a whole new land mass/continent and though he landed in East India and that's why he called them Indians.

 

Oki

 

 

Actually in the old days every grade school kid in America was taught that, but that's when we actually taught history.

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Hieronymous

Growing up in Bismarck and living in Green Bay much the exact same in these parts.

Wonder how many people realize that the term 'Indian' started because Columbus did realize he found a whole new land mass/continent and though he landed in East India and that's why he called them Indians.

 

Oki

I think even fewer people realize that Columbus made the voyage more than once.

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Ladybird

Growing up in Bismarck and living in Green Bay much the exact same in these parts.

Wonder how many people realize that the term 'Indian' started because Columbus did realize he found a whole new land mass/continent and though he landed in East India and that's why he called them Indians.

 

Oki

Yes, we learned that in grade school. They didn't teach us that Columbus never set foot in the area of America now known as the United States.

Edited by Ladybird

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oki

Actually in the old days every grade school kid in America was taught that, but that's when we actually taught history.

 

 

No kidding.

 

Oki

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oki

I think even fewer people realize that Columbus made the voyage more than once.

 

 

History is so yesterday don't you know...

 

Oki

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oki

Yes, we learned that in grade school. They didn't teach us that Columbus never set foot in the area of America now known as the United States.

 

 

Even Columbus himself until the day he died thought he landed on an Island of the coast of India. Truth is to this day we don't know exactly which island he landed on.

 

Oki

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Dean Adam Smithee

YES, to all of the above.

 

BUT... I will point out that cartographer Amerigo Vespucci was the first to point out Columbus's error and state this this was a "new world" and NOT India. (I learned this in quaker school in maybe 3rd or 4th grade). I would also like to point out, for no particular reason, That both Americus (Amerigo in Latin) AND Columbus are towns in The Great State of Georgia, whereas the damned Yankees in Ohio only have one of them covered. :tongue2:

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Severian

The ancient Greeks (remember the well at Alexandria experiment) knew the world was round over 2 thousand years before Columbus, and it's diameter/circumference to better than 10 percent, which is a damned sight more accurate than Columbus.

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Dean Adam Smithee

The ancient Greeks (remember the well at Alexandria experiment) knew the world was round over 2 thousand years before Columbus, and it's diameter/circumference to better than 10 percent, which is a damned sight more accurate than Columbus.

 

 

There is at least SOME evidence that the ancient Greeks and the Carthaginians were at least aware of the Americas even back then.

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Martin
The ancient Greeks (remember the well at Alexandria experiment) knew the world was round over 2 thousand years before Columbus, and it's diameter/circumference to better than 10 percent, which is a damned sight more accurate than Columbus.

 

Columbus needed royal funding to make his expeditions so he used the lowest possible estimate of the distance he proposed to travel. It was scientifically false but it got him the money. What it didn't get him was all the way to India.

 

 

 

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Hieronymous

Even Columbus himself until the day he died thought he landed on an Island of the coast of India. Truth is to this day we don't know exactly which island he landed on.

 

Oki

One book i read said on his first voyage he may have landed on what is known as Hispanola, so Haiti or Dominican Republic? The book also questioned whether Amerigo Vespucci ever set foot on the continent named after him.

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Hieronymous

The ancient Greeks (remember the well at Alexandria experiment) knew the world was round over 2 thousand years before Columbus, and it's diameter/circumference to better than 10 percent, which is a damned sight more accurate than Columbus.

Ptolemy?

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