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Gertie Keddle

Why Does It Cost So Much to Educate a Child in America?

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Gertie Keddle

Why Does It Cost So Much to Educate a Child in America?

By Paula Bolyard August 10, 2018

PJ Media

Excerpt:

 

 

We've heard a lot recently about the I Promise School that LeBron James is helping to start in Akron, Ohio, and, in theory, it seems like a good idea: Gather up 240 at-risk students into a school that, in addition to academics, provides "wraparound" services like free breakfast and lunch and an extended school day and school year to keep kids off the streets.

 

The Akron Beacon Journal reports some staggering dollar amounts being poured into the school that will enroll 240 kids.

 


  •  
  • The school, which is public and part of Akron Public Schools, is costing the district nearly $2.9 million from its general fund to cover the cost of most salaries, benefits, supplies and other base elements of the school.
  • By 2023, Pendleton estimates the school will cost the district a cumulative total of $8.1 million, but he considers it a “long-term investment” that will lead to smaller class sizes in other schools, better enrollment and improved report card ratings, among other benefits.
  • The contributions to the school from the foundation and its partners has amounted to more than $2 million for its physical transformation, additional staffing for smaller class sizes, technology, wraparound supports and other upgrades for the first year, according to the foundation.
  • Peg’s Foundation is committing $2.5 million to the school over the next five years, primarily for its wraparound support services, but also for whatever the LeBron James Family Foundation deems necessary in its first few years.
     

Contrary to some reporting, the LeBron James Family Foundation isn't footing the bill for all of the school's operating expenses. The foundation has donated $2 million thus far for start-up costs and has committed to another $2 million a year as the school builds to capacity. Because IPS will be part of the Akron City School District, a little over 14,000 in tax dollars will be allocated for each pupil enrolled in the school—the same as for students in every other school in the district. Add to that the millions in charity dollars that will be poured into the school every year and the cost of each child's education begins to skyrocket.

 

The chart below shows how education dollars are spent in each state. Note that less than half of school expenditures go to pay teacher salaries—and that gray "other" category comes out to around 28 percent of the total amount spent.

 

download-4.png

 

<edit>

 

Just take a look at this chart from the National Center for Education Statistics showing the armies of support staff schools are carrying in their budgets:

 

download-1.png

 

Let's say you wanted to go out and start a school and you had 30 students ready to enroll on the first day of classes. And say you were given $14,000 per student, so you'd have $420,000 to play around with. You could go for broke and pay a highly qualified teacher a $100,000 salary, spend $1000 per student on books, and still have almost $300,000 left to pay for building expenses or whatever.

 

You could probably run a pretty good school, don't you think?

 

Ah, but then say the state showed up at your door and said you are required to hire a counselor, a nurse, a social worker, a psychologist, an ESL/bilingual teacher, and a cadre of classroom aides. Even if you were able to hire all those people on your budget, that wouldn't be the end of it. The state would come around again to bill you for various "other" expenses, gobbling up more than one-fourth of your budget. Suddenly you're broke and your school is relegated to the ash heap of history, despite your best intentions.

 

And therein lies the problem. Teacher salaries and benefits make up less than half of a school's budget; the rest is spent on "pupil services" and administrative costs (that vast gray area on the chart above). State and federal mandates, many of them bureaucratic in nature, cripple school budgets, leaving less money and less time for the business of educating children. Is it any wonder today's students are widely regarded to be dumber than previous generations? As schools increasingly take on the role that families were designed to play and become social services hubs, the focus becomes less about education and more about shaping society—with devastating results.

 

And lest you think that pouring more money into schools will improve outcomes, this chart from Cato Institute should disabuse you of that fanciful notion:

 

Cato-tot-cost-scores-Coulson-Sept-2012-sm.gif

 

Article

 

 

Including benefits with salary makes teacher compensation take up at least half of expenditures in most states. A quarter is still a large percentage for "other".

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scotsman

Going by global results..........ten quid?. :P :D

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Liz

I take exception to the use of the word "educate". With precious few exceptions, the public school system in the United States is a bloated and expensive bureaucracy that is meant to babysit and indoctrinate kids to the left's point of view. Education is the opposite of what they intend.

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LongKnife

In Houston, they just decided to start providing 3 meals a day to all students regardless of family income. The idea is to put an end to the social stigma suffered by students who were receiving reduced cost lunches. That's the sort of stupidity that can send the cost of an "education" spiraling up.

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MontyPython

I take exception to the use of the word "educate". With precious few exceptions, the public school system in the United States is a bloated and expensive bureaucracy that is meant to babysit and indoctrinate kids to the left's point of view. Education is the opposite of what they intend.

 

VERY well said, Liz. If public schools actually focused on real education, these sorts of "special" programs would be completely unnecessary.

 

B)

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Liz

VERY well said, Liz. If public schools actually focused on real education, these sorts of "special" programs would be completely unnecessary.

 

B)

Thank you. Too bad they don't listen to us, huh? :lol:

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MontyPython

Thank you. Too bad they don't listen to us, huh? :lol:

 

What...? Sorry, I wasn't listening...

 

;)

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Liz

What...? Sorry, I wasn't listening...

 

;)

You and everybody else. :P

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Howsithangin

Why Does It Cost So Much to Educate a Child in America?

By Paula Bolyard August 10, 2018

PJ Media

Excerpt:

 

 

We've heard a lot recently about the I Promise School that LeBron James is helping to start in Akron, Ohio, and, in theory, it seems like a good idea: Gather up 240 at-risk students into a school that, in addition to academics, provides "wraparound" services like free breakfast and lunch and an extended school day and school year to keep kids off the streets.

 

The Akron Beacon Journal reports some staggering dollar amounts being poured into the school that will enroll 240 kids.

 


  •  
  • The school, which is public and part of Akron Public Schools, is costing the district nearly $2.9 million from its general fund to cover the cost of most salaries, benefits, supplies and other base elements of the school.
  • By 2023, Pendleton estimates the school will cost the district a cumulative total of $8.1 million, but he considers it a “long-term investment” that will lead to smaller class sizes in other schools, better enrollment and improved report card ratings, among other benefits.
  • The contributions to the school from the foundation and its partners has amounted to more than $2 million for its physical transformation, additional staffing for smaller class sizes, technology, wraparound supports and other upgrades for the first year, according to the foundation.
  • Peg’s Foundation is committing $2.5 million to the school over the next five years, primarily for its wraparound support services, but also for whatever the LeBron James Family Foundation deems necessary in its first few years.
     

Contrary to some reporting, the LeBron James Family Foundation isn't footing the bill for all of the school's operating expenses. The foundation has donated $2 million thus far for start-up costs and has committed to another $2 million a year as the school builds to capacity. Because IPS will be part of the Akron City School District, a little over 14,000 in tax dollars will be allocated for each pupil enrolled in the school—the same as for students in every other school in the district. Add to that the millions in charity dollars that will be poured into the school every year and the cost of each child's education begins to skyrocket.

 

The chart below shows how education dollars are spent in each state. Note that less than half of school expenditures go to pay teacher salaries—and that gray "other" category comes out to around 28 percent of the total amount spent.

 

download-4.png

 

<edit>

 

Just take a look at this chart from the National Center for Education Statistics showing the armies of support staff schools are carrying in their budgets:

 

download-1.png

 

Let's say you wanted to go out and start a school and you had 30 students ready to enroll on the first day of classes. And say you were given $14,000 per student, so you'd have $420,000 to play around with. You could go for broke and pay a highly qualified teacher a $100,000 salary, spend $1000 per student on books, and still have almost $300,000 left to pay for building expenses or whatever.

 

You could probably run a pretty good school, don't you think?

 

Ah, but then say the state showed up at your door and said you are required to hire a counselor, a nurse, a social worker, a psychologist, an ESL/bilingual teacher, and a cadre of classroom aides. Even if you were able to hire all those people on your budget, that wouldn't be the end of it. The state would come around again to bill you for various "other" expenses, gobbling up more than one-fourth of your budget. Suddenly you're broke and your school is relegated to the ash heap of history, despite your best intentions.

 

And therein lies the problem. Teacher salaries and benefits make up less than half of a school's budget; the rest is spent on "pupil services" and administrative costs (that vast gray area on the chart above). State and federal mandates, many of them bureaucratic in nature, cripple school budgets, leaving less money and less time for the business of educating children. Is it any wonder today's students are widely regarded to be dumber than previous generations? As schools increasingly take on the role that families were designed to play and become social services hubs, the focus becomes less about education and more about shaping society—with devastating results.

 

And lest you think that pouring more money into schools will improve outcomes, this chart from Cato Institute should disabuse you of that fanciful notion:

 

Cato-tot-cost-scores-Coulson-Sept-2012-sm.gif

 

Article

 

 

Including benefits with salary makes teacher compensation take up at least half of expenditures in most states. A quarter is still a large percentage for "other".

 

 

Thank you for posting.

 

There's an ore body of material here. I look forward to pawing through it and sending it to more than a few people.

 

In Houston, they just decided to start providing 3 meals a day to all students regardless of family income. The idea is to put an end to the social stigma suffered by students who were receiving reduced cost lunches. That's the sort of stupidity that can send the cost of an "education" spiraling up.

Were they Halal at least?

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Ticked@TinselTown

I take exception to the use of the word "educate". With precious few exceptions, the public school system in the United States is a bloated and expensive bureaucracy that is meant to babysit and indoctrinate kids to the left's point of view. Education is the opposite of what they intend.

 

And it's the opposite of what they provide.

 

Illiterate sheeple churned out by the thousands every single year.

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E Van der Vliet

I take exception to the use of the word "educate". With precious few exceptions, the public school system in the United States is a bloated and expensive bureaucracy that is meant to babysit and indoctrinate kids to the left's point of view. Education is the opposite of what they intend.

That is why I do not call them "public" schools. They are government schools through and through.

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Ladybird

In Houston, they just decided to start providing 3 meals a day to all students regardless of family income. The idea is to put an end to the social stigma suffered by students who were receiving reduced cost lunches. That's the sort of stupidity that can send the cost of an "education" spiraling up.

I don’t see why kids should be stigmatized because their parents are low income, but there’s a better way of handling it then giving free food to rich kids. We always had a pack of forms to fill out the first two days, some of which had to be completed by a parent or guardian. They don’t do that anymore?

 

Also, more scrutiny on the staff might save some bucks. If lunch lady Doris has a better car than the principal, something might be up.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/15/us/connecticut-lunch-ladies-scam-suspects-trnd/index.html

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scotsman

Why Does It Cost So Much to Educate a Child in America?

By Paula Bolyard August 10, 2018

 

Childminding costs HAVE increased.

Edited by scotsman

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