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MTP Reggie

'Adulting Day' teaches high schoolers how to pay bills, cook,

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MTP Reggie

'Adulting Day' teaches high schoolers how to pay bills, cook, change tires

By: FOX 46 Web Staff

POSTED: DEC 14 2018 08:51PM CST

UPDATED: DEC 17 2018 06:17AM CST

Fox7 Austin

<More Here>

 

SHEPERSVILLE, Ky. - Being an adult is hard, but a high school in Kentucky was hoping to make it a little easier with an "Adulting Day" this week. According to WAVE 3 News, seniors at Bullitt Central High School in Shepherdsville were taught how to cook when they get to college, how to change a tire, and how to pay bills.

 

"I think that the idea occurred to me, originally, I saw a Facebook post that parents passed around saying they needed a class in high school on taxes, and cooking," Christy Hardin, director of the BCHS Family Resource & Youth Services Center, told WAVE 3.

 

(snip)

 

<More Here>

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MontyPython

Pay bills?!? Change a tire!?! Quick, I need a teddy bear and a coloring book!!!

 

:o

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tailgunner

Pay bills?!? Change a tire!?! Quick, I need a teddy bear and a coloring book!!!

 

:o

 

Mom and dad's job. Wait, could also be Grandpa and Grandma's job.

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MontyPython

Mom and dad's job. Wait, could also be Grandpa and Grandma's job.

 

Yep, that's me: Grandpa. And yep, I can change a tire & cook & pay bills.

 

:yes:

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BootsieBets

Actually, this doesn’t sound so much different from classes we had in junior high, way back in the day. They called it Home Economics and such. At that time, they were separated by boys and girls – later they were merged.

 

I learned (well, I already knew because I helped out at home) to cook, how to make a budget, cleaning, sewing, etc. The boys learned how to fix cars and simple electrical repairs. When my younger brother took them, the guys cooked too. And the girls learned basic car care. I don't think it is such a bad idea.

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Ticked@TinselTown

I never took the home ec courses because I learned how to cook from my grandma, but I do recall a course of study for a few weeks in high school in my math class that was designed to teach us about how to budget our income, balance a checkbook, how to determine what you can manage to save while still making sure all your bills were paid and also about credit cards and their interest rates.

 

I thought it was an interesting month and it beat the hell out of trying to figure out what -x was.

 

The better thing to teach teenagers is what its like to work hard and earn a living yourself and take pride in that, instead of get on the dole because it's easy money.

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Censport

I've probably mentioned this before, but when I was in the 4th grade, we were taught how to write checks.

 

FOURTH GRADE.

 

I asked one of the teachers why we had to learn how to write checks IN THE FOURTH GRADE. Her reply was "Because it's important." I then asked why we weren't learning how to drive, as that's important too and nobody ever died from writing a check improperly. Not surprisingly, she didn't have an answer.

 

Four decades later, we're still driving cars - badly. But people rarely write checks.

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Severian

Pay bills?!? Change a tire!?! Quick, I need a teddy bear and a coloring book!!!

 

:o

Hey, at least they're trying to teach the little snowflakes some useful skills.

 

In college we had to take a life skills type course, mandatory, I still have the book somewhere. The book was actually useful as it had templates for various types of letters related to business and job hunting and a few other things. Most of which I already knew but it was a nice reference.

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Dean Adam Smithee

Actually, this doesn’t sound so much different from classes we had in junior high, way back in the day. They called it Home Economics and such. At that time, they were separated by boys and girls – later they were merged.

 

I learned (well, I already knew because I helped out at home) to cook, how to make a budget, cleaning, sewing, etc. The boys learned how to fix cars and simple electrical repairs. When my younger brother took them, the guys cooked too. And the girls learned basic car care. I don't think it is such a bad idea.

 

It was 9th or 10th grade at my school. Boys when to "Shop" class and girls went to home ec - and traded places for 2 weeks a year. I learned how to sew a decorative pillow and bake something.

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Magic Rat

"Adulting" is not a word. Why don't we start fighting ignorance by naming the class properly and not make it sound like the first name of an NFL player.

Edited by Magic Rat

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MontyPython

Hey, at least they're trying to teach the little snowflakes some useful skills.

 

In college we had to take a life skills type course, mandatory, I still have the book somewhere. The book was actually useful as it had templates for various types of letters related to business and job hunting and a few other things. Most of which I already knew but it was a nice reference.

 

Oh I agree completely. My first post in this thread was admittedly flippant, LOL, because I was making fun of what I imagined the precious little snowflakes' responses would be. But in actuality I agree it's a good idea.

 

Just like several previous posters, I too took all the "shop" classes: Woodshop, Metalshop, Autoshop, and each of them included a couple weeks of Home Economics. So yeah, I learned how to cook, balance a checkbook, sew, etc. Life skills I've used many times.

 

B)

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Noclevermoniker

"Adulting" is not a word. Why don't we start fighting ignorance by naming the class properly and not make it sound like the first name of an NFL player.

:biglaugh:

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MontyPython

"Adulting" is not a word. Why don't we start fighting ignorance by naming the class properly and not make it sound like the first name of an NFL player.

 

I'm afraid we missed the boat on that one. When they can use nouns like "gift" and "dialog" as verbs, grammar no longer has any meaning at all.

 

Verbing Weirds Language

 

;)

Edited by MontyPython

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Wag-a-Muffin (D)

"Adulting" is not a word. Why don't we start fighting ignorance by naming the class properly and not make it sound like the first name of an NFL player.

 

 

:biglaugh:

 

 

I'm afraid we missed the boat on that one. When they can use nouns like "gift" and "dialog" as verbs, grammar no longer has any meaning at all.

 

Verbing Weirds Language

 

;)

 

 

"What are you taking in school this semester, Agamemnon?"

"Geometry, Sociology, and Adultery."

Edited by Wag-a-Muffin (D)

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gravelrash

"Adulting" is not a word. Why don't we start fighting ignorance by naming the class properly and not make it sound like the first name of an NFL player.

 

It's called a gerund. Take a noun and make it into a verb or adjective (usually ending with -ing). A unique and quite frustrating feature of the English language.

 

As far as "Adulting Day", it used to be the choice between shop and home economics classes. Where you did learn how to change a tire, sew a quilt, and balance a checkbook. We need more hands-on than propaganda-injection.

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gravelrash

I'm afraid we missed the boat on that one. When they can use nouns like "gift" and "dialog" as verbs, grammar no longer has any meaning at all.

 

Verbing Weirds Language

 

;)

 

Exactly.

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Dean Adam Smithee

It's called a gerund. Take a noun and make it into a verb or adjective (usually ending with -ing). A unique and quite frustrating feature of the English language.

 

As far as "Adulting Day", it used to be the choice between shop and home economics classes. Where you did learn how to change a tire, sew a quilt, and balance a checkbook. We need more hands-on than propaganda-injection.

 

Wasn't it GWB who became known for gerundificating words? The comedian Frank Caliendo used to have a whole act on this.

 

It probably goes back much further, but the first I became aware of this as a pop culture thing was back in the '80s - maybe with the Tawana Brawley case? - where groups of hooligans running around 'wild' in parks, malls, sidewalks etc was verbified into wilding.

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MontyPython

"Let's dialog over lunch. Do you salad or sandwich?"

 

:hairpull:

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Taggart Transcontinental

Pay bills?!? Change a tire!?! Quick, I need a teddy bear and a coloring book!!!

 

:o

 

You know how many tires I have changed as a cop? I mean like REALLY?

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Ben Cranklin

'Adulting Day' teaches high schoolers how to pay bills, cook, change tires

ONE DAY of that, huh? Well, I guess it's better than nothing. So, what happens after the one day of "adulting"? Back to "snowflaking" the rest of the year with the queer theory, social justice mathematics, and multi-cultural science curriculum?

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MontyPython

You know how many tires I have changed as a cop? I mean like REALLY?

 

I believe ya!

 

:yes:

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gravelrash

Wasn't it GWB who became known for gerundificating words? The comedian Frank Caliendo used to have a whole act on this.

 

It probably goes back much further, but the first I became aware of this as a pop culture thing was back in the '80s - maybe with the Tawana Brawley case? - where groups of hooligans running around 'wild' in parks, malls, sidewalks etc was verbified into wilding.

 

Caliendo's GWB routine is hilarious.

 

I think the first occurrence of a gerund would be "Viking".

 

 

7e974b001f6faf589a7d8469eaa0c992--swedish-men.jpg

 

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Italian Biker

You can't really completely blame the kids for this. Parents/parental guidance, or lack of both, is the bigger issue. Parents should have been teaching their kids these type of things over time, and not rely on a school to limit important things to one day's worth of lessons. I could change tires when I was 10 or 11. I was working with my dad off and on from the time I was around 10, mostly a gopher at that age, but learned how to do other things as he started trusting me with power tools on the jobs, and I was driving my dad's work van on supply runs by the time I was 13.

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Severian

You can't really completely blame the kids for this. Parents/parental guidance, or lack of both, is the bigger issue. Parents should have been teaching their kids these type of things over time, and not rely on a school to limit important things to one day's worth of lessons. I could change tires when I was 10 or 11. I was working with my dad off and on from the time I was around 10, mostly a gopher at that age, but learned how to do other things as he started trusting me with power tools on the jobs, and I was driving my dad's work van on supply runs by the time I was 13.

You're right. My mom taught me how to balance a checkbook, how to do laundry, and how to cook. My dad taught me to handle a lot of things, car repair, changing tires, working in the yard, basic tool skills. My father was an amazing man, he could work on cars, do carpentry, make furniture, do masonry from building a brick/block wall to pouring concrete, repair air conditioners and appliances. I guess a life on a farm during the Depression and a career in the Air Force fixing jet aircraft and maintaining atomic bombs all made him a talented, hands on guy.

 

He's been gone many years now, still miss him, and was always just amazed at his ability to do about everything.

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kestrel

I never took the home ec courses because I learned how to cook from my grandma, but I do recall a course of study for a few weeks in high school in my math class that was designed to teach us about how to budget our income, balance a checkbook, how to determine what you can manage to save while still making sure all your bills were paid and also about credit cards and their interest rates.

 

I thought it was an interesting month and it beat the hell out of trying to figure out what -x was.

 

The better thing to teach teenagers is what its like to work hard and earn a living yourself and take pride in that, instead of get on the dole because it's easy money.

 

"X" was those movies you kept trying to get into when you were 14.

I do remember Home Ec and shop class for youngsters and i did get in to an 'X" movie..sort of... Me and some friends watched "Fritz the Cat" from over the fence at the drive in..(remember those?)

 

Kestrel...

Edited by kestrel

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