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Liz

Scott, DeSantis: Florida’s New COVID-19 Spike Not Just Related To Testing

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Liz

HotAir

Ed Morrissey

Posted at 10:01 am on June 22, 2020

Excerpt:

To put Florida’s recent COVID-19 spike in Seinfeldian terms — it’s real, and they’re hoping to keep it from being spectacular. When diagnosed cases began rising sharply this month, state officials cited the context of greatly increased testing as the reason rather than a second-wave outbreak. This morning, however, Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) told CNBC’s Squawk Box that the rate of confirmed diagnoses has outstripped the rate of testing increase, which means … “we have work to do,” Scott said:

“Some might be tied to testing but it’s clearly not all tied to testing,” the Senator said on CNBC’s Squawk Box Monday morning.

“We clearly haven’t beat it. I think everybody is concerned when they read about the number of cases being up. The deaths aren’t growing like that, so that’s a positive.” Scott said.

When asked if there was a possibility for deaths to catch up to the surge in cases, the Senator demurred.

“You sure hope not,” Scott said, adding that “so far” the health care system has handled the surge.

“We clearly haven’t beat it. We’ve got to keep focusing … we’ve got a lot of work to do,” Scott said, noting the potential of the disease surging in places that may have thought they’d beaten the coronavirus.

Governor Ron DeSantis also backed down from the “context” argument this weekend, noting that the spread has now accelerated in younger Floridians. DeSantis urged Floridians to take social-distancing guidelines more seriously, but still professed reluctance to dictate those protocols:

Pointing to a “significant” increase in the number of coronavirus cases among younger people, Governor Ron DeSantis reiterated the need for Floridians to practice social distancing guidelines to prevent the spread of the virus.

During a news conference on Saturday, DeSantis attributed the sharp rise in coronavirus cases in the state to residents in their 20s and 30s – who may not be as vulnerable for serious illness but still run the risk of spreading the virus to older residents. …

But with the spike of positive cases reported this past week – Florida set a record on Saturday with 4,049 new cases in 24 hours, bringing the total to 93,797 – DeSantis said he now sees “a really significant increase in positive tests for people in their 20s and 30s.”

DeSantis specifically pointed to “incredibly low” median ages in Tampa Bay and Central Florida. He said the median age of the 337 Hillsborough County residents who tested positive on Friday was 30, and in Pinellas, the median age was 29 out of the 285 positive cases.

Needless to say, this isn’t good news for Florida, DeSantis, or the idea that the COVID-19 virus has mutated out of rapid transmissibility. The rate of deaths has not increased, as CNBC notes, and the hospitals have not yet been overwhelmed, so it appears that the spike has been managed well. However, as transmissible as this virus is, this kind of spike might presage a much larger run on health-care resources in the near future. And at the very least, Scott and DeSantis are now admitting that this is not just an artifact of ramped-up testing capability.

*snip*

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Ticked@TinselTown

Spring break hangover, perhaps?

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Oathtaker

So the rate of transmission has increased but so far the hospitalization and morbidly have not. 
 

Might this be a result of socialization returning to normal?

Could the virus have mutated in a manner where it is less harmful to humans?

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Rock N' Roll Right Winger
1 hour ago, Oathtaker said:

So the rate of transmission has increased but so far the hospitalization and morbidly have not. 
 

Might this be a result of socialization returning to normal?

Could the virus have mutated in a manner where it is less harmful to humans?

Yep.

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  • Agree (+1) 2

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Big Dave

"Cases" do not equate to sick people.  Hospitalizations are almost nil in the state. Never have been close to overwhelming, but serious in Miami/Dade/Broward. 

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gravelrash
3 hours ago, Big Dave said:

"Cases" do not equate to sick people.  Hospitalizations are almost nil in the state. Never have been close to overwhelming, but serious in Miami/Dade/Broward. 

Wuhan flu is the "last gasp" of the Baby Boomer generation. It's not enough to die of natural cause. It's a cause to the bitter end. [Eric Cartman] The 60s hippies are coughing, spitting, hacking and wheezing the virus to wage germwarfare[/Eric Cartman].

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Dean Adam Smithee
3 hours ago, Big Dave said:

"Cases" do not equate to sick people.  Hospitalizations are almost nil in the state. Never have been close to overwhelming, but serious in Miami/Dade/Broward. 

Same in Georgia. "cases" are up but hospitalizations are pretty much steady; Nowhere NEAR close to overwhelming the system like back in April-ish. 

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zurg
On 6/22/2020 at 2:53 PM, Oathtaker said:

Could the virus have mutated in a manner where it is less harmful to humans?

I think this is a distinct possibility and something the virus engineers weren't counting on as a result of a lockdown. I think they've been counting on it being with us forever, and we can only be released from its bondage if they give us the vaccine.

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