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Report: Gun, Ammo Sales Surge amid Push to Defund Police

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Rock N' Roll Right Winger
1 minute ago, Ticked@TinselTown said:

I'm printing all this out and taking it with me when I go shopping...

I wished that we lived closer!

I'd take you out on a date to the world famous Knob Creek gun range here and let you try out my handgun collection to see which one fits you the best? :yes:

I've got quite a variety in various calibers.

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Ticked@TinselTown
25 minutes ago, Rock N' Roll Right Winger said:

I wished that we lived closer!

I'd take you out on a date to the world famous Knob Creek gun range here and let you try out my handgun collection to see which one fits you the best? :yes:

I've got quite a variety in various calibers.

That actually sounds like alot of fun...

Although...  is it really a wise thing to be next to Ticked when a gun gets put into her hand? 🤔

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MontyPython
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Dean Adam Smithee said:

As posted before, I've only ever had occasion to kill a person once. A late-night burglar in a used car lot I was managing in the late '80s where part of my pay was being allowed to live in a house trailer behind the office. Heard a noise, investigated, fired everything I had at a movement I saw in the office.

Snubnose .38. Knowing the office, maybe 6 to 8 ft.

The cops asked over and over  "how many times did I fire?". My only answer was that I had no Idea, I fired until I couldn't. And I've no idea how many "hits",   but it was apparently "enough". LOL

Barrel length? I dunno. I think it depends on Mfr. With my Makarov with it's 3.7" barrel I can hit within 1" at 10 yards. Yeah, okay, so I'm not going to be winning any championships but  MORE than sufficient for personal/household defense. 

ON THE OTHER HAND, other pistol is a 9MM (9x19) Astra. A real piece of scheisse. Similar dimension to the Makarov but, swear to god,  you could fire this thing off the bow of a ship and not even be guaranteed to hit the ocean. That kinda sucks, because Astra has a good reputation. Maybe I just got a "lemon"?

 

Yup, I remember you relating that incident. Just think, with a 6" barrel you could've hit with the very first shot at 6 to 8 feet.

:) 

 

2 hours ago, Squirrel said:

A 357 revolver allows you to fire both 38 and 357. It allows you to use 38 for range practice and gives you the option of keeping 357 or 38 self defense rounds in it when not at the range. 

 

Yes, that's true. But there are still other things to consider. For one thing a .357 will generally be more expensive than a .38 (as well as often bigger & heavier.) Why spend that extra money and have that less-comfortable and less-lightweight gun IF you're ONLY going to use it for home defense with .38 rounds? If you'll never use it for anything else, and will therefore never need to load it with (also more expensive) .357 rounds, why pay unnecessary extra money?

And another thing: Nowadays I always preach that it's a mistake to "practice" with .38's, if you're going to actually use it as a .357. Here's why: Personal experience. I introduced one of my previous girlfriends to firearms, and made the mistake of always using .38 rounds in my .357 while she learned to use it. Then one day after she was pretty experienced and confident and comfortable with my gun, I made the mistake of loading it with .357's before we went shooting. When she fired that .357 for the first time she was NOT properly prepared for it, even though it was the same gun she'd been using for weeks, and even though I'd warned her about the more powerful kick. The gun kicked much harder than she had ever felt it kick before, much harder than she anticipated. It jumped completely out of her hand, fell to the cement platform she was standing on, and slid another two or three feet after impact. The gun wound up all scratched and she wound up with a sprained wrist.

I'll never make that mistake again. These days I'm in the process of teaching my wife to shoot, and I WILL NOT allow her to use .38's in my .357 for "practice" purposes. I want her to get used to shooting with .357 rounds or not at all. Always practice with .357's in a .357. Practicing with .38's in a .357 can lead to problems down the road.

 

1 hour ago, Rock N' Roll Right Winger said:

That's good sound advice too.

But I suggest loading the .38 with high quality bonded jacket hollow points in +p.

https://www.underwoodammo.com/collections/handgun-ammo/products/38-special-p-125-grain-bonded-jacketed-hollow-point?variant=18785726955577

Not as stout as a .357 magnum, but still packs a wallop with less recoil and sound.

The 6" barrel gives it good velocity and foot pounds of punch too. As for "inaccurate snub noses", I strongly beg to differ. It depends upon the make and model. I own several several Smith and Wesson snubbies that are real tack drivers. They will amaze you because like anything else, they have to be fed the proper ammo (velocity and grains of lead) for the best results. I have a model 629 in .44 magnum in a 3" barrel that is every bit as accurate as my 586 .357 magnum with a 6" barrel that I used in competition/match shooting.

Revolvers rarely ever fail to fire. They NEVER jam. Very reliable. I'm primarily a revolver guy, only pack semi-autos mostly for concealment and extra capacity. At home my go to are revolvers and 12 gauge shotguns that I have strategically hidden/placed around in my house.

I have an old Colt .38 special police positive that has a 5" barrel with iron sights and it is a real tack driver. I inherited it from my father. I used to shoot it a lot as a kid whenever I could earn enough money for dad to buy me the cartridges. He's let me shoot it so long as I bought the loads for it whenever we went out to the country.

 

As far as proper maintenance, a Glock is so much easier to clean and maintain than any revolver. They are super simple to break down and clean. I didn't believe it until I became an owner of one at the urging of a co-worker who showed me his Glock carry pistol and let me fire it. Now I own many in various calibers.

 

(I like that phrase "tack driver". Never heard/read it before.)

As for accurate snub-noses, I'll have to bow to your wider experience. In my entire life I've owned one .38 snub-nose and hated the damn thing. Couldn't hit a fish in a barrel if my life depended on it. Got rid of it as fast as I could and never looked back. I'll never own another because even though I never expect to be attacked by fish in a barrel, LOL, there are circumstances where having an accurate-shooter might very well be the difference between life & death.

And you bring up a very good point I intended to include in my first post, but just plain forgot: Revolvers are much more reliable for newcomer-shooters because they just don't jam up on you like semi-autos sometimes do.

And I'll also have to take your word about Glocks, never having owned or used one.

:shrug: 

 

1 hour ago, Rock N' Roll Right Winger said:

THIS!^

As I said earlier to Ticked. Make sure to have the proper grips installed to fit the hand.

If one has no confidence in the gun and can hit accurately then it is worthless to that person.

 

 

Absolutely. :yes: If you can't hold the gun comfortably, you can't shoot it safely or accurately. It really is just that simple.

 

55 minutes ago, Ticked@TinselTown said:

Thank you, sir!

 

You're welcome!

:D 

 

 

Edited by MontyPython
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Rock N' Roll Right Winger
Posted (edited)
50 minutes ago, Ticked@TinselTown said:

That actually sounds like alot of fun...

Although...  is it really a wise thing to be next to Ticked when a gun gets put into her hand? 🤔

I trust you. ;)

One more revolver caliber to consider for mild recoil and being pretty potent in the new .327 Federal magnum developed by Ruger.

It is a .32 caliber loaded hot but has a lower bullet weight so it does not kick all that much with the added pressure and velocity. One of my co-workers is an older gentleman who just cannot tolerate any extra loud handgun that kicked more than a .38 special or a 9mm Luger/parabellum.

He owns a Ruger GP 101 chambered in .327 magnum. He and his wife both love it and are confident with it and hit with it accurately. I have never fired or owned a revolver in this loading, but the ballistic specs on it should prove it a good one shot man stopper.

BTW, when it comes to actual shootings statistics, the fact is that .357 magnum with 125 grain hollow points out of a 4" barrel has taken down more perps in one shot by police forces worldwide than any other caliber loading in the world still to this very day no matter what anyone else says. The police in this country used call it their "lightning".

Edited by Rock N' Roll Right Winger

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Tikk

Honestly, I'm looking into claymore mines at this point

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Rock N' Roll Right Winger
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, MontyPython said:

 

Yup, I remember you relating that incident. Just think, with a 6" barrel you could've hit with the very first shot at 6 to 8 feet.

:) 

 

 

Yes, that's true. But there are still other things to consider. For one thing a .357 will generally be more expensive than a .38 (as well as often bigger & heavier.) Why spend that extra money and have that less-comfortable and less-lightweight gun IF you're ONLY going to use it for home defense with .38 rounds? If you'll never use it for anything else, and will therefore never need to load it with (also more expensive) .357 rounds, why pay unnecessary extra money?

And another thing: Nowadays I always preach that it's a mistake to "practice" with .38's, if you're going to actually use it as a .357. Here's why: Personal experience. I introduced one of my previous girlfriends to firearms, and made the mistake of always using .38 rounds in my .357 while she learned to use it. Then one day after she was pretty experienced and confident and comfortable with my gun, I made the mistake of loading it with .357's before we went shooting. When she fired that .357 for the first time she was NOT properly prepared for it, even though it was the same gun she'd been using for weeks, and even though I'd warned her about the more powerful kick. The gun kicked much harder than she had ever felt it kick before, much harder than she anticipated. It jumped completely out of her hand, fell to the cement platform she was standing on, and slid another two or three feet after impact. The gun wound up all scratched and she wound up with a sprained wrist.

I'll never make that mistake again. These days I'm in the process of teaching my wife to shoot, and I WILL NOT allow her to use .38's in my .357 for "practice" purposes. I want her to get used to shooting with .357 rounds or not at all. Always practice with .357's in a .357. Practicing with .38's in a .357 can lead to pr

 

 

 

Agreed.

I can practice with a .22 or .38 or a 9mm for hand eye co-ordination.

But for proper muscle memory one should always practice with the gun and ammo that they are actually going to carry/use.

Never practicing with the hotter loads if you carry them is a no-no.

As far as cost, it isn't worth one's life to go too cheap with the guns or the ammo in my opinion.

Even .357 magnum could be found rather cheap in quantity when these big runs/demands/shortages on ammo weren't occurring like they have been ever since the Obamunist and our government creating these stupid crises? Rimmed case handgun ammo is really expensive vs rimless semi-auto handgun case ammo for some unknown reason? It has to be because of popularity because it takes more to machine manufacture/stamp out the rimless ammo I have been told.

Edited by Rock N' Roll Right Winger
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Squirrel

The best advise is shoot the gun your looking at before you buy it. Most ranges at least here in Dallas rent hand guns. Just the way a gun fits your hand can make a huge differance in accuracy. I owned one glock in my life. It seemed I always hit low and left with it regardless what I did. Luckily I went shooting with a freind that had the same issue with his colt 1911. But he was dead on with the glock and I was dead on with the colt. We just ended up trading guns. Also the kick of a caliber varies from gun to gun manufacture. My 357 with a 6” barrel has little kick. My snub nose conceal carry with wood grips,, 10 rounds of 357 I’m done at the range. It starts to sting and is no fun. The coonan 1911 chambered in 357 I can shoot all day with no issue. I like the option of being able to target shoot with 38. But I always also shoot some 357 at the range just to stay familiar with the round I carry in them. Everyone’s given great advise I just wanted to add rent or go to the range with someone that has the gun you look at before buying it. I know that glock for me could have been a real expensive mistake.

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MontyPython
3 hours ago, Rock N' Roll Right Winger said:

Agreed.

I can practice with a .22 or .38 or a 9mm for hand eye co-ordination.

But for proper muscle memory one should always practice with the gun and ammo that they are actually going to carry/use.

Never practicing with the hotter loads if you carry them is a no-no.

As far as cost, it isn't worth one's life to go too cheap with the guns or the ammo in my opinion.

Even .357 magnum could be found rather cheap in quantity when these big runs/demands/shortages on ammo weren't occurring like they have been ever since the Obamunist and our government creating these stupid crises? Rimmed case handgun ammo is really expensive vs rimless semi-auto handgun case ammo for some unknown reason? It has to be because of popularity because it takes more to machine manufacture/stamp out the rimless ammo I have been told.

I agree 100% that a few dollars cheaper is NOT worth a life.

I also agree that you should use the hotter loads for "practice" if you intend to use the hotter loads in non-practice situations. Practicing with .38 rounds in a .357 is just wrong if you intend to keep the gun loaded with .357 the rest of the time.

B)

 

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Rock N' Roll Right Winger
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Squirrel said:

The best advise is shoot the gun your looking at before you buy it. Most ranges at least here in Dallas rent hand guns. Just the way a gun fits your hand can make a huge differance in accuracy. I owned one glock in my life. It seemed I always hit low and left with it regardless what I did. Luckily I went shooting with a freind that had the same issue with his colt 1911. But he was dead on with the glock and I was dead on with the colt. We just ended up trading guns. Also the kick of a caliber varies from gun to gun manufacture. My 357 with a 6” barrel has little kick. My snub nose conceal carry with wood grips,, 10 rounds of 357 I’m done at the range. It starts to sting and is no fun. The coonan 1911 chambered in 357 I can shoot all day with no issue. I like the option of being able to target shoot with 38. But I always also shoot some 357 at the range just to stay familiar with the round I carry in them. Everyone’s given great advise I just wanted to add rent or go to the range with someone that has the gun you look at before buying it. I know that glock for me could have been a real expensive mistake.

Shoot low and to the left with the glock while shooting right handed?

That's called "milking".

Try pointing the last end digit of your gun hand thumb downwards and not squeezing the lower grip with your pinky.

You want to "clamp" the handle of the pistol, not grip/squeeze all around it because if you do your hand will rotate towards the inside as you squeeze the trigger.

That will fix that problem.

I learned that one from Massad Ayoob who is one of my favorite people of all to learn about firearm self defense techniques and practice. I have read many of his books, watched his videos and attended a training class of his. Heckuva smart and nice guy.

I actually shoot best using just one hand. I can instinctively point shoot very well like aiming a water hose jet. Up close I don't really even need the use of the sights.

 

I also found that most of the time when I cannot hit well with a pistol that it's me and not the gun. I have a "Ransom Rest" and have clamped every pistol and revolver in it to adjust the sights and all of the ones that I own shoot well. So from that I have learned how to hold the handgun better to stop goofing up and stop blaming the gun when it's not the gun.

I have an old small .380 AMT "backup" single action that I used to pocket carry for years. That gun has crummy integrated sights and a short barrel, but that little sucker is amazingly accurate after i worked over the trigger pull problem. I can literally write my name with it at 50 feet. I used to not like any semi-auto handguns other than a 1911 because I could not hit with them until I did some research and found out that it was me. I have friend of mine who's an old wise man. My pistols that I could never hit worth a damn with he would pick up and shoot quarter sized groups with at 50 to 75 feet. He proved to me that it was me and not my guns and gave me excellent advice of choosing the best ammo for each for accuracy.

But however there are some real POS older cheap handgun makes/models out there that do shoot like crap and cannot be made to do any better. Astra, High Point, Bersa, older Taurus etc. are all POS in my opinion. The first generation of all metal centerfire semi-autos made by S&W were crap too, way too loosely built. They were made to not risk a jam first above shooting accurately. Barrel throat and lockups were way too loose.

Edited by Rock N' Roll Right Winger

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Severian

There are two limitations of a revolver, one is limited ammo and time to reload, 5 or 6 rounds, though there are 7 round 38/357s out there. The other is I don't know of a revolver that has the ability to add a weapon light, no rails. I find a weapon light a good thing if you need to patrol the house. ID that target. Fortunately you can find laser grips for most revolvers it seems, which helps with aiming in those panic/low light situations. I do agree that revolvers have simplicity, reliability, and such going for them. And for women with reduced hand strength, no slide to have to rack. My wife cannot rack my 1911 at all, same for my 9mm. So she has a Ruger LCR in 38.

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MontyPython
2 minutes ago, Severian said:

There are two limitations of a revolver, one is limited ammo and time to reload, 5 or 6 rounds, though there are 7 round 38/357s out there. The other is I don't know of a revolver that has the ability to add a weapon light, no rails. I find a weapon light a good thing if you need to patrol the house. ID that target. Fortunately you can find laser grips for most revolvers it seems, which helps with aiming in those panic/low light situations. I do agree that revolvers have simplicity, reliability, and such going for them. And for women with reduced hand strength, no slide to have to rack. My wife cannot rack my 1911 at all, same for my 9mm. So she has a Ruger LCR in 38.

Re - The quick-reload point: That can be solved! Just as a person with a semi-auto can buy extra magazines, load them and carry them for quick reloading, a person can buy/load/carry extra revolver cylinders! That's right, instead of trying to reload the cylinder one bullet at a time, just pop the empty cylinder out and replace it with another cylinder, already loaded. It takes only a few seconds.

:D 

 

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Squirrel
8 hours ago, Rock N' Roll Right Winger said:

Shoot low and to the left with the glock while shooting right handed?

That's called "milking".

Try pointing the last end digit of your gun hand thumb downwards and not squeezing the lower grip with your pinky.

You want to "clamp" the handle of the pistol, not grip/squeeze all around it because if you do your hand will rotate towards the inside as you squeeze the trigger.

That will fix that problem.

I learned that one from Massad Ayoob who is one of my favorite people of all to learn about firearm self defense techniques and practice. I have read many of his books, watched his videos and attended a training class of his. Heckuva smart and nice guy.

I actually shoot best using just one hand. I can instinctively point shoot very well like aiming a water hose jet. Up close I don't really even need the use of the sights.

 

I also found that most of the time when I cannot hit well with a pistol that it's me and not the gun. I have a "Ransom Rest" and have clamped every pistol and revolver in it to adjust the sights and all of the ones that I own shoot well. So from that I have learned how to hold the handgun better to stop goofing up and stop blaming the gun when it's not the gun.

I have an old small .380 AMT "backup" single action that I used to pocket carry for years. That gun has crummy integrated sights and a short barrel, but that little sucker is amazingly accurate after i worked over the trigger pull problem. I can literally write my name with it at 50 feet. I used to not like any semi-auto handguns other than a 1911 because I could not hit with them until I did some research and found out that it was me. I have friend of mine who's an old wise man. My pistols that I could never hit worth a damn with he would pick up and shoot quarter sized groups with at 50 to 75 feet. He proved to me that it was me and not my guns and gave me excellent advice of choosing the best ammo for each for accuracy.

But however there are some real POS older cheap handgun makes/models out there that do shoot like crap and cannot be made to do any better. Astra, High Point, Bersa, older Taurus etc. are all POS in my opinion. The first generation of all metal centerfire semi-autos made by S&W were crap too, way too loosely built. They were made to not risk a jam first above shooting accurately. Barrel throat and lockups were way too loose.

I know it was me not the gun with that glock. Everyone else that used it hit dead on. But rather then readjust trading guns was a simpler solution. Plus after 15 yrs in the army the colt was second nature. The only down side was my friend would take money from me to pay for the difference in value. So I basicly got a hell of a deal on the colt. 
 For first time gun buyers with a revolver you’ll never run into miss feeds or a jam. The smith and Wesson 686 comes chambered in 7 rounds and is extremely accurate. But most places at least down here that runs at least 100$ more then chambered in 6.

 Accuracy wise it comes down to what your using the gun for. If it’s just home defense almost any gun should be plenty accurate across a room.

 I have one friend whose wife didn’t want any guns in the house because of kids. They came to an agreement of just a pump shotgun. He’s an idiot in my thought. But in his thoughts the wife will let him have it without ammo in the house. He says just racking it is the universal sound for get the f out of here. So he basicly owns a scary sounding bat that’s hard to swing.

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Severian
2 hours ago, MontyPython said:

Re - The quick-reload point: That can be solved! Just as a person with a semi-auto can buy extra magazines, load them and carry them for quick reloading, a person can buy/load/carry extra revolver cylinders! That's right, instead of trying to reload the cylinder one bullet at a time, just pop the empty cylinder out and replace it with another cylinder, already loaded. It takes only a few seconds.

:D 

 

I know about speed loaders, my wife carries one with her revolver. But (you knew it was coming) they are nowhere near as fast as reloading an automatics magazine. Swapping mags is much quicker.

As for 100 buck premium for that 7th round, sounds expensive but if you're in a situation where you need it, it'll sound pretty cheap.

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MontyPython
1 hour ago, Severian said:

I know about speed loaders, my wife carries one with her revolver. But (you knew it was coming) they are nowhere near as fast as reloading an automatics magazine. Swapping mags is much quicker.

As for 100 buck premium for that 7th round, sounds expensive but if you're in a situation where you need it, it'll sound pretty cheap.

Actually, I'm not talking about speed-loaders. With a speed-loader you must still remove the empty casings first, then speed-load the fresh bullets. I'm talking about popping the entire cylinder out and replacing it with another cylinder which is already loaded. On my single-action Ruger New Model Blackhawk revolver that requires merely opening the gate and removing the base pin. The cylinder pops right out, and to put in the new one simply reverse the process. I have practiced this maneuver many times and can do it in a matter of about 5-6 seconds. 

I realize that's still not as fast as replacing most semi-auto magazines, but it's fast enough to suit me. The extra 2 or 3 seconds aren't enough to make me choose all the disadvantages inherent in semi-autos.

:shrug: 

 

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Magic Rat
1 hour ago, Severian said:

I know about speed loaders, my wife carries one with her revolver. But (you knew it was coming) they are nowhere near as fast as reloading an automatics magazine. Swapping mags is much quicker.

As for 100 buck premium for that 7th round, sounds expensive but if you're in a situation where you need it, it'll sound pretty cheap.

My .357 is a Taurus Tracker, 4 inch.  It holds 7.  I bought it used for only about $250.  It's the most accurate revolver I have, even double action.

Like rrrw said, I usually use hot plus P .38's because it's cheaper too shoot.  I occasionally shoot .357.  It is comfortable to fire but too big to carry.

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Magic Rat
Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, MontyPython said:

Actually, I'm not talking about speed-loaders. With a speed-loader you must still remove the empty casings first, then speed-load the fresh bullets. I'm talking about popping the entire cylinder out and replacing it with another cylinder which is already loaded. On my single-action Ruger New Model Blackhawk revolver that requires merely opening the gate and removing the base pin. The cylinder pops right out, and to put in the new one simply reverse the process. I have practiced this maneuver many times and can do it in a matter of about 5-6 seconds. 

I realize that's still not as fast as replacing most semi-auto magazines, but it's fast enough to suit me. The extra 2 or 3 seconds aren't enough to make me choose all the disadvantages inherent in semi-autos.

:shrug: 

 

Sounds like your Blackhawk is a frontier model six-shooter and not one with a swing out cylinder.  Especially because it is SAA.  Replacing the cylinder would be faster to load but how do you keep the loose rounds in the chambers?

Edited by Magic Rat

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MontyPython
6 minutes ago, Magic Rat said:

Sounds like your Blackhawk is a frontier model six-shooter and not one with a swing out cylinder.  Especially because it is SAA.  Replacing the cylinder would be faster to load but how do you keep the loose rounds in the chambers?

 

You can buy belt-mounted "sheaths" to hold the loaded cylinders:

 

SL1860.JPG

 

(Since I work with leather, I made my own. But they can be purchased already made.)

:) 

 

 

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Magic Rat
Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, MontyPython said:

 

You can buy belt-mounted "sheaths" to hold the loaded cylinders:

 

SL1860.JPG

 

(Since I work with leather, I made my own. But they can be purchased already made.)

:) 

 

 

Oh.  I wasn’t aware that it was a percussion.  I have a replica Colt Army .44.  About as accurate as squirt gun but fun to load and fire.

I’5 like to see some of your tooled leather.

Edited by Magic Rat

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MontyPython
7 minutes ago, Magic Rat said:

Oh.  I wasn’t aware that it was a percussion.  I have a replica Colt Army .44.  About as accurate as squirt gun but fun to load and fire.

I’5 like to see some of your tooled leather.

 

No, mine isn't percussion - That's just a photo I found on the 'nets, in order to show the cylinder holsters. The revolver in the picture isn't mine. Here's a picture of mine:

 

KZcp2K3M_Sfgih-F9xnGwyajY8U5jDp7Z3QlcnuO

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oki
On 6/26/2020 at 1:03 PM, MontyPython said:

Ticked - You've gotten some good advice so far. R&RRW & Squirrel & Oki clearly know their firearms and you really can't go wrong if you follow their advice. But I'd like to add my own 2¢: A 6" barrel .38 revolver. Here's why:

Why a .38? Because it just doesn't "kick back" like a .357 does, even though they're the same basic diameter. For multiple-use stuff a .357 might be best, but for purely home-defense purposes a .38 is plenty of firepower.

Why a 6" barrel? Because while no handgun is going to be very accurate, there's nothing less accurate than a "snub-nose" handgun. You might point it at the door, but shoot yourself in the knee, LOL. OK that's obviously an exaggeration, but the point remains the same, with a "snub-nose" handgun you're lucky if you can hit the broad side of a barn. Get at least a 6" barrel.

Why a revolver? Because you must take into account the cleaning & oiling & general maintenance of your gun, not just the shooting thereof. The difference between the moving parts, springs, slides, stops, clips, magazines, etc of a semi-auto and the total moving parts of a revolver is huge. Cleaning & oiling & maintaining a revolver is only a fraction of the work of cleaning & oiling & maintaining a semi-auto.

Well, there's my 2¢.

:D

 

Absolutely,    power, size, etc, means nothing if you can't hit what you are aiming at, nor can't afford to shoot it.  It's not a matter of what works for everyone else, it's a matter of what works for you.  And, thank you.  I am hardly an expert, just someone who can only offer my own 2 cents based on my own experience. 

 

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oki
13 hours ago, MontyPython said:

Actually, I'm not talking about speed-loaders. With a speed-loader you must still remove the empty casings first, then speed-load the fresh bullets. I'm talking about popping the entire cylinder out and replacing it with another cylinder which is already loaded. On my single-action Ruger New Model Blackhawk revolver that requires merely opening the gate and removing the base pin. The cylinder pops right out, and to put in the new one simply reverse the process. I have practiced this maneuver many times and can do it in a matter of about 5-6 seconds. 

I realize that's still not as fast as replacing most semi-auto magazines, but it's fast enough to suit me. The extra 2 or 3 seconds aren't enough to make me choose all the disadvantages inherent in semi-autos.

:shrug: 

 

Revolvers do have the advantage of being far more accurate.  As they say it's not how many bullets you can shoot which matters, it's how many hit there mark.

 

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Severian
6 hours ago, oki said:

Revolvers do have the advantage of being far more accurate.  As they say it's not how many bullets you can shoot which matters, it's how many hit there mark.

 

Now hold on there kemosabe, I can't agree with that statement. I can drive tacks with my series 70 M1911. Especially as most people use revolvers in double action mode, the long trigger pull is not as accurate as single action, or a semi-auto with a good trigger. But familiarity with YOUR weapon is what makes the difference. Find something you can shoot well, and practice till you're good at hitting things.

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MontyPython
2 minutes ago, Severian said:

Now hold on there kemosabe, I can't agree with that statement. I can drive tacks with my series 70 M1911. Especially as most people use revolvers in double action mode, the long trigger pull is not as accurate as single action, or a semi-auto with a good trigger. But familiarity with YOUR weapon is what makes the difference. Find something you can shoot well, and practice till you're good at hitting things.

Yup, here we agree completely - I don't know of any evidence to suggest that revolvers are "more accurate" than semi-autos. I do know that single-action is more accurate than double action, but that's just because of the stark difference between the already-c0cked hammer position vs the hammer both lifting & falling.

B)

 

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oki
14 hours ago, Severian said:

Now hold on there kemosabe, I can't agree with that statement. I can drive tacks with my series 70 M1911. Especially as most people use revolvers in double action mode, the long trigger pull is not as accurate as single action, or a semi-auto with a good trigger. But familiarity with YOUR weapon is what makes the difference. Find something you can shoot well, and practice till you're good at hitting things.

   Well, I am 'half' incorrect.  Turns out it used to be the case up until recently, but do to huge improvements in Semi Auto's they are largely equal. 

 

https://www.gunnuts.net/2013/08/12/tactical-mythbusting-revolvers-are-more-accurate-than-semi-autos/

In fact, this myth does have a kernel of truth to it; back in the days before CNC machining, it was quite likely that if you took a brand new production revolver off the line and put it up against a brand new semi-auto pistol, the revolver would shoot more accurately. But now days, that’s not the case. To understand why, we have to look at the firing cycle of both guns.

A semi-auto pistol chambers the round, and when it is fired, the bullet engages the barrel’s rifling almost instantly. The barrel doesn’t begin its reward movement until the bullet has cleared the barrel. Additionally, most modern constructed semi-automatic pistols lock up quite a bit tighter than the old rattlecan guns of the 1930s and 40s. Thanks to the joys of modern CNC machining, we can build guns with tolerances that would have been unheard of for factory guns even a generation ago. This is why we get Gen 4 Glocks that can shoot 1.90 inch groups.

 

I really need to get out more.

 

Reminds me, need to start hunting for a #27 RCBS 4 stage shell plate.  Would be nice to use my 4 stage press for .40

Finally, got the shell plate for .223 this past week.

 

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Severian
Posted (edited)

Well, as he says, there's a big difference between, say, an old Military issue M1911, where the slide rattles if you shake the gun (reliability over long range accuracy, same as with the AK47), and a Colt Goldcup M1911 target pistol with a tight slide and precision barrel bushing. Less a function of design than of specific implementation. My Series 70 seems to strike the right balance, the only time it's ever jammed was it stove piped a lot of this one box of cheap range reloads that were under loaded. Nowadays it's a lot more accurate than my eyes are.

Edited by Severian

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