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kestrel

Systemic Hypocrisy

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kestrel

gatestoneinstitute.org

Systemic Hypocrisy

by Judith Bergman
July 31, 2020

Corporate giants might be more successful at convincing the public that they truly care about social justice and inequality if this "care" did not only manifest itself in statements filled with virtue-signaling but in business practices as well. In March, a media report revealed that children as young as eight were "working 40-hour weeks in gruelling conditions" on Guatemalan coffee bean farms that supply Starbucks. Pictured: Starbucks corporate headquarters in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images)

Since the killing of George Floyd, corporate virtue signaling has reached unprecedented heights.

Apple pledged $100 million reportedly to "combat racism."

"The unfinished work of racial justice and equality call us all to account," Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook said in a Twitter video. "Things must change, and Apple's committed to being a force for that change. Today, I'm proud to announce Apple's Racial Equity and Justice Initiative, with a $100 million commitment".

Starbucks pledged $1 million in "Neighborhood Grants to promote racial equity and create more inclusive and just communities".

Microsoft announced that it would invest $150 million more into diversity and inclusion efforts in the company. "We are committed to take action to help address racial injustice and inequity, and unequivocally believe that Black lives matter", CEO Satya Nadella said.

Nike pledged to donate $40 million over the course of four years to "organizations that put social justice, education and addressing racial inequality in America at the center of their work". According to John Donahoe, President and CEO of Nike, Inc.:

"Systemic racism and the events that have unfolded across America... serve as an urgent reminder of the continued change needed in our society...We will continue our focus on being more representative of our consumers while doing our part in the communities we serve."

EXCERPT:

Nike, Apple, Microsoft and Samsung, among 83 multinational companies, were found in March to be linked to Uyghur forced labor in Chinese factories, according to a report, "Uyghurs for Sale," by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI).

"The Chinese government has facilitated the mass transfer of Uyghur and other ethnic minority citizens from the far west region of Xinjiang to factories across the country", stated the report.

"Under conditions that strongly suggest forced labour, Uyghurs are working in factories that are in the supply chains of at least 83 well-known global brands in the technology, clothing and automotive sectors, including Apple, BMW, Gap, Huawei, Nike, Samsung, Sony and Volkswagen.

"This report estimates that more than 80,000 Uyghurs were transferred out of Xinjiang to work in factories across China between 2017 and 2019, and some of them were sent directly from detention camps. The estimated figure is conservative and the actual figure is likely to be far higher. In factories far away from home, they typically live in segregated dormitories, undergo organised Mandarin and ideological training outside working hours, are subject to constant surveillance, and are forbidden from participating in religious observances".

This was not entirely breaking news. Already in December of 2018, The New York Times ran an article about incarcerated Uyghurs forced to work in factories. The use of all kinds of prisoners in factories that supply Western companies is not new, either: In recent years, stories of messages from prisoners found in Chinese manufactured goods have gone viral.

EXCERPT:

One would think that companies that claim to be concerned with justice and equality would be boycotting and divesting from a regime that not only enables, but actively engages in forced labor – a nicer word for slavery. In theory, they would not be seen anywhere near forced labor. Uyghur lives, apparently, do not matter.

Starbucks ran into a similar scandal, also in March, that showed the grim realities beneath the coffee chain's carefully designed "woke" image. A media report revealed that children as young as eight were working on Guatemalan coffee bean farms that supply the chain.

"Channel 4's Dispatches filmed the children working 40-hour weeks in gruelling conditions, picking coffee for a daily wage little more than the price of a latte," the Guardian noted. "The beans are also supplied to Nespresso, owned by Nestlé..."

"The Dispatches team said some of the children, who worked around eight hours a day, six days a week, looked as young as eight. They were paid depending on the weight of beans they picked, with sacks weighing up to 45kg. Typically, a child would earn less than £5 [less than US $6.40] a day, although sometimes it could be as low as 31p an hour. Over the course of the investigation, Dispatches visited seven farms linked to Nespresso and five linked to Starbucks. Child labour was found on all the farms"

LINK:

https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/16280/systemic-hypocrisy?utm_source=whatfinger

 

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gravelrash

File in the Grow The F*k Up and human history category of LIFE.

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Ticked@TinselTown

Money talks and bullschit walks.

In this case, the hypocrites throwing money around to 'shame' the average Americans whom they tacitly hold responsible for 'continued systemic racism' toss their Benjamins around in an effort to divert attention from the trolls behind the curtains in each of their glass houses.

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kestrel
1 hour ago, Ticked@TinselTown said:

Money talks and bullschit walks.

In this case, the hypocrites throwing money around to 'shame' the average Americans whom they tacitly hold responsible for 'continued systemic racism' toss their Benjamins around in an effort to divert attention from the trolls behind the curtains in each of their glass houses.

Oh yeah...

K...

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Buckwheat Jones

It’s all about virtue signals. 

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zurg

Systemic hypocrisy. I love the title. It’s perfectly stated. 

I so abhor these statements from corporate executives that talk about:

On 7/31/2020 at 9:51 PM, kestrel said:

Systemic racism and the events that have unfolded across America... serve as an urgent reminder of the continued change needed in our society

See how the implication is so very very clear? “Urgent reminder” of the “continued change needed”. There’s nothing about working positively with people to talk through issues like adults would do. There’s no presumption of innocence or even close to it. No, the implication is crystal clear: whites are guilty (meaning right wing whites) and they will be FORCED to do the “right thing” because they are guilty, and have been guilty, for so long. 

There’s absolutely nothing in statements with such wording that would persuade me to succumb to these aholes. Nothing. 

  • Agree (+1) 1

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