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Howsithangin

Dunkirk 'Little Ship' which rescued 130 Allied troops during daring World War II evacuation with senior officer who survived the Titanic at the helm is sold for £40,000 before it undergoes a restoration

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Howsithangin

Dunkirk 'Little Ship' which rescued 130 Allied troops during daring World War II evacuation with senior officer who survived the Titanic at the helm is sold for £40,000 before it undergoes a restoration

 

By JAMES ROBINSON FOR MAILONLINE 09:27 EDT, 13 July 2020

 

A family pleasure cruiser which against-the-odds helped carry 130 allied troops to safety during the Miracle of Dunkirk has been sold for £40,000. Dodging dive bombing Luftwaffe planes and German U-boat attacks, The Sundowner was one of the many Dunkirk 'Little Ships' which made the daring journey across the English Channel during the famous Second World War rescue operation. But 80 years on from its war heroics, the 58ft motor yacht is now set to feature in a new rescue mission - its own -  before it gets to its new owner.

The motor yacht is on its way to Dennett’s Boat Builders in Chertsey, Surrey, where it will undergo a two year restoration before it is handed over to its new owner - an enthusiast for Dunkirk Little Ships, according to the Isle of Thanet News.

The Sundowner had previously been moored at Ramsgate’s Inner Harbour, Kent, and was owned by The Steam Museum Trust - which holds the lease to the Ramsgate Maritime Museum.Originally built as an Admiralty vessel in 1912, the ship went into private ownership in 1929.  Owner Charles Lightoller survived the sinking of the Titanic in 1912 before taking part in the Miracle of Dunkirk in 1940. But on May 31, 1940, its then-owner Charles Lightoller, a sailor, the Second Officer of the Titanic, who survived its sinking on its maiden voyage in 1912, received a call from the Admiralty requesting his assistance to the rescue the troops stranded at Dunkirk.

He didn’t hesitate to volunteer his pleasure cruiser Sundowner, but he refused to allow the Royal Navy to sail her across the Channel.

‘If anybody is going to take her over, my eldest son and I will,’ he said.

The very next morning, together with his eldest son Roger, 34, and an 18-year-old Sea Scout named Gerald Ashcroft, the trio sailed from Ramsgate to help rescue troops as they wait rescue from mainland Europe and the rapidly advancing Nazis.

By the time Sundowner reached Dunkirk harbour, about 200,000 troops had already been rescued. But there were many thousands more still pinned down on the beaches and in the harbour. Troops piled in and the Sundowner, now much lower in the water, cast off from HMS Worcester and began its return journey to Ramsgate with 130 men aboard. 

<snip>

The Rest of the Story HERE, with some nifty PHOTOS

 

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MontyPython

I love this kinda stuff!

:2up: 

 

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Howsithangin

Ditto 😊

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scotsman

Me too, and of course those little ships and Dunkirk is close to my heart and those of every Briton. 

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